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Onkyo DX-7555

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Comments to date: 2. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
Joke9289d2 9:19am on Thursday, October 21st, 2010 
Another exceptional product from Onkyo! Hi from England - and Greece! I recently bought one of these CD players new for £199!
Gecko 12:40am on Saturday, July 10th, 2010 
Excellent! I purchased this player when my Sony DVP-S900ES died. The Sony was a great Redbook player, but this Onkyo is better. Nice, but a mafunction I got this unit in August 2009. Single CD player is better than carousel for some I bought this single disc CD player to replace a carousel CD player of lesser quality.

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Stereophile: Onkyo DX-7555 CD player

1/31/08 9:14 AM

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CD Players/Transports

Onkyo DX-7555 CD player
By Robert Deutsch January, 2008
I first heard a CD player in my own system in 1984 or 1985, several years before I began writing for Stereophile. I was curious about the Compact Disc mediumI'd read about it, had listened to CDs in stores, and was eager to hear what they sounded like in my own system. I'd even bought a CD: the original-cast recording of 42nd Street, which I already had on LP. One evening, a friend who worked for Sony and knew that I was an audiophile brought over his latest acquisition: a CDP501ES, the second from the top of Sony's line of CD players. He also brought along a bunch of CDs, including some solo-piano discs, and Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Symphony's then-famous recording of Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture (Telarc CD-80041).

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We connected the Sony player to my system. My friend was most enthusiastic: "Listen to how quiet the background is! No ticks and pops like you get on records!" We listened to one of the solo-piano CDs. The sound was sharper, crisper than I'd been used to hearing from my Lps (footnote 1). And, yes, the background was very quietno ticks or pops. Promising. Then I put on the 1812 Overture. The background was still quiet, butoh dear, when the massed strings came in, everything fell apart: a jumble of sound and lost definition, as if the entire string section had been replaced by a synthesizer. The brass at first seemed to fare better, but then I noticed an edge, a harshness that was distinctly less plausibly realistic than recordings of brass on LPs. The bass was good, tighter and more extended than on LP. And 42nd Street? The solo voices were well focused, but sounded somehow less natural, more artificial, and the soundstage depth that was present on the LP had been curtailed. Was this what they called "perfect sound forever"? Trying not to put a damper on my friend's enthusiasm, I made vaguely positive comments about the clarity and the lack of noise, but I wasn't even slightly tempted to ask him if he could get me one of these players at the employee's-discount price. It was at least another year before I found a CD player (the Philips-based Mission DAD7000) I liked enough to buy. By then, it was becoming obvious that CD was the format of the future, and that resistance was futile. I have a feeling that if the first CD player I heard in my system had been an Onkyo DX-7555, my impression of the format would have been much more positive. Description and Design The DX-7555 matches the size and styling of Onkyo's A-9555 integrated amplifier, which I reviewed in the September 2007 Stereophile, and shares with it several design features. Like the A-9555, the DX-7555's front panel is brushed aluminum; it has a fairly heavy, antiresonant chassis, a power transformer of substantial size and weight, and features Onkyo's proprietary Vector Linear Shaping Circuitry (VLSC), which is claimed to remove digital noise from the analog signal by using a comparator/feedback method. The digital-to-analog conversion is handled by a Wolfson Microelectronics WMA8740 24-bit/192kHz DAC. The digital clock is said to be highly precise (1.5ppm) and to produce very low jitter.

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very low jitter. The DX-7555's Setup mode permits selection of analog output polarity and digital filter slope: Sharp (flat to 20kHz, with a steep cutoff after that) or Slow (gradual high-frequency rolloff, to better maintain audioband phase accuracy). An unusual feature of the player is that the frequency of its digital clock can be adjusted by the user to match specific CDs. I assume that this feature is included for the type of audiophile who feels compelled to adjust the cartridge VTA for every LP and writes down the optimal setting on the record jacket. After a bit of fiddling, with inconclusive results, I left the clock frequency alone. The DX-7555 has optical and coaxial digital outputs, the digital signal having a "direct" path to the output through shielded cables, to protect the signal from noise and interference. The DX-7555 has a full set of convenience features: headphone output with volume control, 25-step memory playback, four repeat modes, fourmode display dimmer, and Remote Interactive (RI) input/output jacks for integration with other Onkyo RI-enabled devices. The remote control has the same sort of logical layout that I praised in the A-9555's remote, with a large, distinctively shaped Play button, but doesn't include controls for polarity and filter slope, which would have made these features more convenient to use.

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Oh, and it looks really nice, with fit and finish that suggest a product from a high-end specialist manufacturer rather than a medium-priced mass-market offering. Sound I've always thought that the principle of "first do no harm" should be applied to designers of audio products as well as to physicians, and the folks at Onkyo seem to have followed this principle in designing the DX7555. Listened to on its own, without explicit comparison to any other digital source, the DX-7555 impressed me as sounding smooth, and lacking the annoying harshness that I remember from that firstgeneration Sony player of more than two decades ago. It had an easyon-the-ears quality that allowed me to listen for long periods with no symptoms of the dreaded "listening fatigue."
Article Continues: Page 2

Company Info

Onkyo USA Corporation
Web Site 18 Park Way Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458 (201) 785-2600

Article TOC

Page 1 Page 2 Specifications Associated Equipment Measurements Wes Phillips on the Onkyo
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Home Page Reviews Recent Additions Budget Components Loudspeakers Floorstanding Loudspeakers Bookshelf Loudspeakers Subwoofers Amplification Tube Preamps Tube Power Amps Solid-State Preamps Solid-State Power Amps Integrated Amps/Receivers Phono Preamps Digital Sources CD Players/Transports Hi-Rez Disc Players/Transports Digital Processors Computer Audio Media Servers/MP3 Players Analog Sources Turntables Tonearms Phono Cartridges FM Tuners Accessories Cables Phono Accessories Powerline Accessories Room Acoustics Treatments Stands/Racks Headphones & Accessories Miscellaneous Columns As We See It Listening / Art Dudley The Fifth Element / John Marks Music in the Round / Kal Rubinson Fine Tunes / Jonathan Scull Features Special Features Reference Interviews Think Pieces Historical Music Recording of the Month Records 2 Die 4 Music/Recordings Blogs Wes Phillips Stephen Mejias Robert Baird Fred Kaplan Latest News Audio News

Onkyo DX-7555 CD player: Page 2
I don't have a copy of the Telarc 1812 Overturewhich, whatever its sonic qualities, is possibly the most boring interpretation of the work on recordbut I do have a Telarc sampler featuring recordings from that period, and the DX-7555's presentation of orchestral sound was very pleasing, the string sections of orchestras sounding much like. well, string sections, and avoiding the squeaky chalk-on-a-blackboard effect that bad digital sound can produce. Just for old times' sake, I also played 42nd Street. That was fine, too, except for the tap-dancing bits, which came across more as sound effects than as real tap. (This is very likely the fault of the recording itself; microphones have a difficult time capturing the sound of tap.) I played my usual reference CDs: the Chesky Records Jazz Sampler and Audiophile Test Compact Disc, Vol.1 (Chesky JD37); Mickey Hart's Planet Drum (Rykodisc RCD-10206); and Sylvia McNair's Sure Thing: The Jerome Kern Songbook (Philips 442 1292). There were no surprises, and the aural fatigue factor was again kept to a minimum, but there was somewhat less of a sense of detail and transparency than I've heard before with these recordings. Before I discuss specific comparisons with other CD players, I should talk about the effect of changing the DX-7555's digital filter characteristics. You'll recall that the Onkyo's Setup mode allows selection of filter slopes: Sharp (steep) or Slow (gradual). These appear to correspond to the Measuring and Listening options of the Ayre CX-7e CD player, and, as I note in the sidebar, I prefer the sound of the Ayre with this switch in the Listening position. With the Onkyo, however, my preference was the opposite: the Slow setting (corresponding to the Ayre's Listening setting) was very laid-back, with somewhat better spatial definition, but it was just too soft-soundingat least in my system, and for my taste. I went back and forth several times between the two settings, using different CDs, and preferred Sharp every time. All of my comments about the sound of the DX-7555 are based on its filter slope being set to Sharp. Trying to determine the contribution to a system's sound of only one of its components is no easy task, and although introducing a new component into a familiar system is a good start at getting a handle on that product's sound, I think it's important to make direct comparisons with other components. In this case, I had two other digital sources on hand: the Ayre CX-7e, my new reference for high-end CD players (see sidebar); and the Marantz DV8400, a DVD-Video/Audio/SACD/CD player that I've had in my home theater for the last few years, and which was described by Kal Rubinson, in his "Music in the Round" column of May 2004 (Vol.27 No.5), as "a capable performer offering balanced sound, extended frequency range, and good soundstage imaging and depth," though he noted that it "lacked a little in dynamics." In making these comparisons, I tried to control potentially confounding variables: I used the same pair of interconnects for each player or, where the comparison involved balanced outputs/inputs, balanced interconnects of the same make, model, and length. I matched output levels to within 0.1dB, measuring voltage at the amplifier output using the sinewave level signal on Stereophile's first Test CD (Stereophile STPH002-2), and using the volume control of my PS Audio GCC-100 integrated amplifier. The outputs of the Onkyo and the single-ended Ayre were pretty close to begin with, but the Ayre's balanced output was considerably higher, and the Marantz's single-ended output was quite a bit lower without compensation. Comparing the single-ended output of the Ayre with the Onkyo, with their levels matched, it didn't require a great deal of intensive listening to conclude that, as good as the Onkyo was, the Ayre was in a different league. The CX-7e revealed more instrumental detail and a wider, deeper soundstage, with more precise spatial definition of instruments

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deeper soundstage, with more precise spatial definition of instruments and voices within the stage. Music reproduced by the Ayre was more engaging, with a dynamic thrust that made the Onkyo sound slow in comparison (and remember, this was not with the Onkyo's digital filter set to Slow). The Ayre achieved this without its sound becoming too forward or clinicala difficult balance for any audio component to achieve. The Ayre's treble was not more extended than the Onkyo's in any obvious way, but the bells and other treble percussive instruments on track 3 of the Chesky test disc had a more pristine clarity through the Ayre. The bass was seemingly deeper in extension, and more clearly definedan effect particularly evident when I played Mickey Hart's Planet Drum. These differences were even more obvious when the comparison was with the Ayre's balanced output, this no doubt related to the fact that the PS Audio GCC-100's circuitry is also fully balanced. Dynamics were more powerful still, a related effect being that, after listening to a CD on the Onkyo, and then to the same disc on the Ayre via its balanced outputs, the sound actually seemed louder. I even checked my settings to make sure I hadn't somehow failed to correctly match the levels, but the settings were correct. The Ayre CX-7e sells for $2950, almost five times the price of the Onkyo DX-7555, so it should sound better. It definitely does. Comparing the Onkyo DX-7555 with the Marantz DV8400 was a different story. I seldom listen to CDs in my home-theater system, but when I have, my impression of the Marantz has been much like Kal's: "a capable performer," indeed. This impression persisted when I listened to the Marantz in my two-channel system, but when I switched to the Onkyo, it was apparent that the Onkyo had better dynamics, greater clarity, and more extended treblecall it a more-than-capable performer. Of course, the Onkyo plays only CDsthe Marantz also plays DVDs (with excellent video quality), DVD-As, and SACDs, and a good deal of its $1695 cost is to pay for these capabilities. Still, considering the DV8400 as only a CD player, I felt the Onkyo was superior. The end of the road A few days before it was time to pack up the Onkyo DX-7555 and send it off to John Atkinson to be measured, I hooked it up to the Onkyo A9555 integrated amplifier. The combination worked beautifullynot surprising, given that they have many of the same technical design features, and were launched at the same time. And both components seem cut from the same sonic cloth, sounding smooth, laid-back, and slightly soft (the A-9555 perhaps a bit more than the DX-7555), and neither is particularly strong in dynamics. The combo of the Ayre CX-7e CD player and the PS Audio GCC-100 integrated is capable of producing sound that's more transparent to the source, and better at communicating the excitement of music. If you told me you had $6000 to spend on a CD player and integrated amplifier, I'd recommend the Ayre and the PSA. Still, the Onkyo pairing at just over one fifth the price produced a very comfortable sound that was simply very pleasant to listen to, and is likely to be more tolerant of excessive brightness and treble roughness in speakers. The DX-7555 at $599 and the A-9555 at $699 represent excellent value and are highly recommended.

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Footnote 1: My system at the time consisted of a Linn turntable and tonearm and, I think, a Supex cartridge; a Conrad-Johnson PV-2ar tube preamp; a Luxman MQ-68c tube power amplifier for the top and a Bryston 3B solid-state amp for the bottom; and original Quad speakers paired with Cizek MG-27 subwoofers. The sound was uncommonly smooth, and not prone to exaggerating faults in the source.
Article Continues: Specifications

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Page 3 of 3

1/31/08 9:16 AM

Onkyo DX-7555 CD player: Wes Phillips on the Onkyo
Wes Phillips wrote about the Onkyo DX-7555 in February 2008 (Vol.31 No.2): "Still got that Oppo DV970HD universal player you reviewed last May?" asked John Atkinson. "Yeah," I said, grudgingly, afraid he might want to borrow it. "Good. I'd like you to listen to the $599 Onkyo DX-7555 CD player, which Robert Deutsch just reviewed for the January issue. He compares it to the Ayre CX-7e, which costs a lot more, and to an older Marantz universal player. I think the Oppo would make a helpful real-world comparison." Roger, Chiefespecially as I wouldn't have to surrender the little Oppo that could. Not only does the DV970HD do yeoman service in my small listening room, playing CDs, DVD-As, and SACDs (albeit not in native DSD), but since my acquisition of a new Sim2 D 10 projector, it has distinguished itself as my highest-resolution video source (via its HDMI output). Not too shabby for $200. And while I have great admiration for Onkyo's engineers, I thought the Oppo set the bar pretty high, even for a $599 "Red Book"only player. I installed the Onkyo in my smaller dedicated listening room, feeding an Ayre AX-7e integrated amplifier with an identical length of the Stereovox HDSE interconnect I was already using for the Oppo. I biwired a pair of Usher Be 718 speakers with Stereovox Firebird cables, mostly because I could. I then spent time getting to know the Onkyo, which, for a strictly "Red Book" machine, offers quite a few listening options. After determining that the Onkyo and the Oppo were in sync on the polarity front, I began playing with the Onkyo's reconstruction filter slope. I quickly realized that I'm on the same page as Bob Deutsch concerning the Onkyo's digital filter. Sharp sounded, well, sharpernot in that clichd sense of "digital edge," but in terms of focus and detail. There may be folks who prefer the filter's Slow setting, but I didn't cotton to it. However, as Bob said, if your system has an excess of detail, the Slow slope couldperhaps, conceivablycome in handy. Unlike Bob, I was glad Onkyo hadn't put the polarity and filter settings on the remote's keypads. I used to have a friend who would recalibrate my EQ settings when I wasn't lookinghe had fun watching me scratch my head and wonder why something sounded different. Some things are better hidden, I says. I began serious listening with Len Moskowitz's recording of Sing We Nowell, by the women chamber singers Angelica. Recorded at the South Presbyterian Church in Dobbs Ferry, New York, which boasts a healthy decay time of almost three seconds, the disc is a testament to Moskowitz's (and Angelica's) artistry. The first track, Creator Alme Siderum, begins with the sustained decay of a handbell, closely followed by plainchant. Through the Onkyo, the recording's clarity and tonal purity gave me goose bumps. Mesmerized, I found myself listening to the next track and then the next, before remembering I was engaged in serious business. I repeated Creator Alme Siderum, this time played by the Oppo. Hmmm. They were very close. Perhaps I heard more "space" with the Onkyo; perhaps the Oppo set the music against its background with greater contrast. But which was right? And how big a difference am I talking about, really?

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As I switched between the players, I began to wonder if I was hearing differences simply because I must. I listened to Bobbie Gentry's Chickasaw County Child (CD, Shout! DK 32278) and Manu Katch's Neighborhood (CD, ECM 1896), my nominees for 2008's "Records To Die For," and I could hear differences between the two. But these weren't night-and-day tonal differences, or extremes in soundstaging or holography. They were just differences. Then, while listening to Bobbie Gentry on the Onkyo, I noticed an interesting thing sometime around track 16, "Fancy." Maybe you're ahead of me on this, but it was the fact that, instead of doing A/B comparisons, I had listened to 16 tracks because I couldn't wait to hear what the next one sounded like. I then reviewed my listening notes, and discovered that it wasn't the first time this had happened while listening to the DX-7555. In fact, it had happened only while listening to the DX7555. Ah-ha, I thought. This is what they call a clue! Rather than obsessively probing for minute differences with the same passages or tracks, I set about listening to 20-minute "suites"five or six tracks in a rowthen taking a physical inventory. After these longer sessions with the Oppo, I seemed to carry more tension in my shoulders, which is one of the ways I manifest listening fatigue. With the Onkyo, that was seldom the caseand yes, I know the narrative would be more clear-cut if I said "never." Don't you hate it when facts get in the way of a good theory? How does the Onkyo DX-7555 stack up against the Oppo DV970HD? The Oppo is one-third the price, reads hi-rez discs, makes a pretty darn good digital transport feeding hi-rez DACs, and offers surprisingly crisp DVDVideo performance. I'd still call it a bargain. However, at the end of the day, I preferred the Onkyo as a CD player. It may be a one-trick pony, but it does that trick awfully welland it's a trick I like a lot.Wes Phillips Sidebar 4: WP's Associated Equipment Digital Source: Oppo DV970HD. Integrated Amplifier: Ayre AX-7e. Loudspeakers: Usher Be 718. Cables: Interconnect: Stereovox HDSE. Speaker: Stereovox Firebird. Accessories: Shunyata Research Hydra 6 power conditioner, OSAR equipment stand, RealTraps Mini & Mondo Traps.Wes Phillips

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DX-7555

AUDIOPHILE-GRADE CD PLAYER

Available in Gold

Providing Superior Audio Quality through Noise-Free, Accurate Digital Delivery
Your systems digital front-end is a vital link in the audio reproduction chain. The exacting process of retrieving digital data and converting it to analog without the influence of digital noise is a key determinant in assessing the class of different playback components. Also, the ability to control timing inaccuracies ( jitter) is another crucial factor in the quality of audio reproduction of digital sources like CDs and MP3s. The DX-7555 audiophile-grade CD player has been designed with these considerations in mind. With Onkyos Vector Linear Shaping Circuitry (VLSC), the digital signal is protected from pulse noise, and with a super precision clock, a precise timing reference is maintained. By combining quality parts like a sophisticated 192 kHz/24-bit DAC with Onkyos renowned build quality, the DX-7555 will deliver digital audio sources with the accuracy they deserve.
Vector Linear Shaping Circuitry (VLSC) Essentially, a CD players primary purpose is to read digital information and convert that information into an analog signal to feed to a preamplifier. Simple as it seems, every digital signal is plagued by pulse noise (which is particularly harmful in compressed formats like MP3). Conventional D/A conversion methods reduce digital pulse noise at the conversion stage but cant remove it completely. Onkyos VLSC is a unique digital-to-analog conversion circuit designed to overcome this problem. Data is converted between the sampling points, and these discrete sampling points are joined with analog vectors in real-time to produce a smooth output wave form. This ensures that the DX-7555s analog output is delivered as accurately as possible. Super Precision Clock for Superior Audio Performance The DX-7555 boasts an extremely precise clocking mechanism to control and coordinate the timing of all digital signal processes. If you think of the clock as an orchestra conductor, then the separate digital signals are the individual instruments in that orchestra. Without a talented conductoran accurate clock sound quality is degraded. That means youll get a harsh treble, a smaller soundstage and music that sounds synthetic. The DX-7555s state-of-the-art crystal oscillator achieves a frequency deviation of just 1.5 ppm, compared with 50 ppm on a conventional crystal oscillator. The difference is crystal clear: a stunningly realistic sound field and a beautifully sustained tone for all musical instruments. Wolfson Microelectronics 192 kHz/24-bit Stereo DAC The DX-7555 features a Wolfson Microelectronics 192 kHz/24-bit stereo DAC (WM8740) designed for digital audio applications. This DAC supports an input data word length from 16 to 24 bits and sampling rates up to 192 kHz. The DAC consists of a serial interface port, digital interpolation filter, multi-bit sigma delta modulator and stereo DAC in a small 28-pin SSOP package. It also includes a digitally controllable mute and attenuator function on each channel. The DACs internal digital filter enables two selectable roll-off characteristics: sharp or slow.
Selectable Control for Digital Filter, Phase Control and Clock The DX-7555 gives you a variety of selectable options that give you greater control over audio playback. For the digital filter, you can select sharp roll-off (enables a flat response up to 20 kHz) or slow roll-off (enables the tempo to be modified for full sound imaging). It is also possible to select from two analog output phases: Normal phase, where the recorded waveform is output with polarity intact; and Reverse phase, where the recorded waveform is output with polarity reversed. Finally, the DX-7555 also gives you the capability to increase or to decrease the clock frequency to improve sound imaging. If you make no adjustments, the DX-7555 uses its factory default settings. Quick Navigation for MP3 CD Playback Various preferences can be selected to help you easily find and playback MP3 contents burnt to CD-R and CD-RW. In Group mode, you can select a folder than select the MP3 track from that folder. In Navigation mode, you can select MP3 tracks by moving through the folder hierarchy. You can use the search button on the remote controller to select MP3 tracks and folders by number. Quick navigation helps you to easily locate and to playback when you have multiple music sources recorded to one disc. Exclusive Direct Digital Path Unlike other CD players that use PC-board copper traces to transfer the digital audio signal, the DX-7555 employs a high-purity, heavy-gauge, shielded cable to directly output the digital bitstream straight from the disc to the back panel. The result is a noise-free digital audio signal that is less susceptible to flux. High-Grade Build Quality The DX-7555 is constructed so that unwanted noise and vibrations wont taint your delicate audio signal. A high-rigidity, anti-resonant chassis prevents the possibility of noise being picked up from external surfaces. Instead of opting for cheap alternatives, Onkyo has chosen an aluminum front panel to enhance the DX-7555s solid appearance. It also gives the DX-7555 a dependable feel that reflects the engineering quality lacking in todays CD players.

Features

Plays audio CDs, MP3 CDs, CD-R/CD-RWs* Vector Linear Shaping Circuitry (VLSC) Super precision clock (1.5 ppm) Selectable control for digital filter, phase control and clock Massive power transformer Wolfson Microelectronics 192 kHz/24-bit DAC Direct Digital Path 2 Digital outputs (Optical/Coaxial) Headphone jack with volume control Quick navigation for MP3 CD playback 25-step memory playback and 4 repeat modes 4-mode dimmer Ultra-smooth CD loading mechanism High-rigidity, anti-resonant chassis Brushed aluminum front panel RI (Remote Interactive) system compatible Remote control
*Discs that have not been properly finalized may only be partially playable or not playable at all.

Remote Control

SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Response... 2 Hz-20 kHz Total Harmonic Distortion... 0.0027 % Audio Dynamic Range... 100 dB Signal-to-Noise Ratio... 111 dB Audio Output
Digital (Optical)... - 22.5 dBm Digital (Coaxial)... 0.575 Vp-p/75 Analog... 2.0 V (rms)/470

GENERAL

Power Supply... AC 220-230 V, 50/60 Hz Power Consumption... 14 W Standby Power Consumption.. 0.2 W Dimensions (W x H x D).. 435 x 111 x 405 mm Weight... 8.0 kg
Due to a policy of continuous product improvement, Onkyo reserves the right to change specifications and appearance without notice. VLSCis a trademark of Onkyo Corporation. All other trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Onkyo Corporation 2-1 Nisshin-cho, Neyagawa-shi, OSAKA 572-8540, JAPAN Tel: +81-72-831-8136 Fax: +81-72-833-5222 http://www.onkyo.com/ Onkyo China Limited Units 2102-2107, Metroplaza Tower I, 223 Hing Fong Road, Kwai Chung, N. T., HONG KONG, SAR of China Tel: +852-2429-3118 Fax: +852-2428-9039 http://www.ch.onkyo.com/ Onkyo U.S.A. Corporation 18 Park Way, Upper Saddle River, N.J. 07458, U.S.A. Tel: +1-201-785-2600 Fax: +1-201-785-2650 http://www.onkyousa.com/ Onkyo Europe Electronics GmbH Liegnitzerstrasse 6, 82194 Grobenzell, GERMANY Tel: +49-8142-4401-0 Fax: +49-8142-4401-555 http://www.eu.onkyo.com/
NPR No. 05N60 11/05 Printed in Japan

 

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