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Nokia 6100

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About

Nokia 6100Nokia 6100 Cellular phone 725 KB - Not specified - GSM

Internal antenna, Up to 360 minutes talk, Up to 320 hours standby, 2.7 oz

Simple yet sophisticated, compact yet comfortable. Don't let its size deceive you - the Nokia 6100 phone offers advanced mobile technology, providing you with uncompromising performance for both private and professional life. The Nokia 6100 phone's small size, large color display, and comfortable keypad make it compact, yet convenient. Write messages and calendar notes, or access your phone's various features with the four-way scroll key. Add more media to your messages with your Nok... Read more

 

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User reviews and opinions

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Comments to date: 9. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
oAUGGIEo 5:30am on Friday, October 8th, 2010 
Bought this over a year ago. Easy to use, excellent battery, Tri-band, good layout, color display, very light weight and slim. Not much
r2d2_here 11:36am on Thursday, October 7th, 2010 
Do you know with NOKIA 6100 ? Yes ,of course .Everyone surely knows NOKIA 6100. In a good shape. its Nokia 6100, which has simple design, small size, but it has high durability.
Jackson Diniz 1:02pm on Tuesday, September 28th, 2010 
The best phone ever used This phone is not only light, small but also stylish!Its a cute little phone with all the functions you need. The best phone ever used This phone is not only light, small but also stylish!Its a cute little phone with all the functions you need.
123emoney43 5:39pm on Thursday, September 9th, 2010 
This phone is surprisingly good. Very light, super keyboard and absolutely sick battery life! Sometimes I forget that it needs charging at all. This phone is surprisingly good. Very light, super keyboard and absolutely sick battery life! Sometimes I forget that it needs charging at all.
David Gee 5:59am on Monday, June 7th, 2010 
I have had the 6100 for about a month now. I chose it after deliberating between it, the 6610 and 5100. In the end, it came down to the look.
arunize 9:55pm on Thursday, May 20th, 2010 
The main functions of the Nokia 6100 mobile phone standard GSM network error-correcting Supporting Supporting GSM GPRS frequency (MHz) 900/1800/1900 T... Year, and i found that nokia 6100 is the most lovely cellphone that i have even owned. For it is legerity to take.
Lee_Dailey 5:47pm on Sunday, May 16th, 2010 
I once had this phone and it was good mobile phone, i went on wap, the google internet mobile internet on the phone and done loads of things on there. I never use any Nokia phones, 6100 is the first Nokia phone that I ever use.
rhsauer 9:15am on Thursday, April 29th, 2010 
Although i have been using the Internet in some form since 1992. The Nokia 6100 is a truly great mobile phone!!! Compact size.
Slaimer 1:39pm on Saturday, March 20th, 2010 
simple platform which uses series 40 nokia.oldschool business device. maybe outdated, but surely, having this phone is a great deal.

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

Nokia 6100 LCD Display Driver
Revision 1 Author: James P. Lynch

Introduction

There have been countless millions of Nokia cell phones sold world-wide and this economy of scale has made it possible for the hobbyist and experimenter to procure the LCD graphic display from these phones at a reasonable price. Sparkfun Electronics (www.sparkfun.com) sells a model 6100 for $19.95 (US). Ive seen sources for this display on EBay for $7.99 (US) plus $10.00 shipping (from Hong Kong, so shipping is a bit slow). The Swedish web shop Jelu (www.jelu.se) has this display for about $20.00 (US) also (see photograph below). Olimex uses these displays on their more sophisticated development boards, so this tutorial will be geared to the Olimex SAM7-EX256 board shown on the front cover.
Figure 1. Nokia 6100 LCD Display (from Jelu web site) The important specifications for this display are as follows: 132 x 132 pixels 12-bit color rendition (4 bits red, 4-bits green, 4-bits blue) 3.3 volts 9-bit SPI serial interface (clock/data signals)
The major irritant in using this display is identifying the graphics controller; there are two possibilities (Epson S1D15G00 or Philips PCF8833). The LCD display sold by the German Web Shop Jelu has a Leadis LDS176 controller but it is 100% compatible with the Philips PCF8833). So how do you tell which controller you have? Some message boards have suggested that the LCD display be disassembled and the controller chip measured with a digital caliper well thats getting a bit extreme. Heres what I know. The Olimex boards have both display controllers possible; if the LCD has a GE-12 sticker on it, its a Philips PCF8833. If it has a GE-8 sticker, its an Epson controller. The older Sparkfun 6100 displays were Epson, their web site indicates that the newer ones are an Epson clone. Sparkfun software examples sometimes refer to the Philips controller so the whole issue has become a bit murky. The trading companies in Honk Kong have no idea what is inside the displays they are selling. A Nokia 6100 display that I purchased from Hong Kong a couple of weeks ago had the Philips controller.
I was not happy with any of the driver software examples I had inspected; they all seemed to be mash-ups collections of code snippets for both types of controllers mixed together. None of these examples matched exactly the Philips PCF8833 or the Epson S1D15G00 user manuals, which can be downloaded from these links. Philips/NXP PCF8833: http://www.nxp.com/acrobat_download/datasheets/PCF8833_1.pdf Epson S1D15G00: http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=569
So I set out to write a driver based solely on the LCD controller manufacturers manual. This is not to say that I didnt have my own mysteries. I had to invert the entire display and reverse the RGB order to get the colors to work out properly for the Philips controller. The Epson S1D15G00 user manual is a poor English translation and nearly incomprehensible. To keep this tutorial simple, I will not address the issues of scrolling or partial displays (to conserve power) since these are rarely-used features. I used the Olimex SAM7-EX256 evaluation board as the execution platform. This is an ARM7 board with many peripherals that is an excellent way to learn about the ARM architecture at a reasonable price ($120 from Sparkfun). I also used the YAGARTO/Eclipse platform as the cross-development environment which is explained in great detail in my tutorial Using Open Source Tools for AT91SAM7 Cross Development which can be downloaded from the following link: http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/atmel_tutorial_source.zip
Hardware connection issues are also not the subject of this tutorial; you can download the Olimex schematic for the SAM7-EX256 board to see their design for a hardware interface to the Nokia 6100 LCD display.

Consider the following points. The resolution of the Nokia 6100 display is 132 x 132 pixels, 12 bits/pixel. Since the 8 bits/pixel encoding is converted by the color table to 12 bits/pixel, there is no saving of display memory. The 8 bits/pixel encoding would use about 1/3 less data bytes to fill an area, so there would be a performance gain in terms of the number of bytes transferred. The 8 bits/pixel encoding would make a photograph look terrible. In the authors view, theres very little to be gained by using this mode in an ARM microcontroller environment. Therefore, I elected to not implement the color table and 8-bit encoding in this driver.
16 bits per pixel Selection of 16 bits/pixel mode is accomplished by sending the Color Interface Pixel Format command (0x3A) followed by a single data byte containing the value 5. This encoding requires a Memory Write command and two subsequent data bytes to specify a single pixel. The color information is encoded as 5 bits for RED, 6 bits for GREEN and 5 bits for BLUE, as shown in Figure 10 below 0 R G 0 R G 1 R G 0 R B 1 R B 1 G B 0 G B 0 G B RAMWR command (memory write) Data: Red (5 bits), Green (6 bits) Data: Green (6 bits), Blue (5 bits)
Figure10. Color encoding for 16 bits per - pixel This pixel encoding is converted by the controller using a dithering technique to the 12-bit data for the pixel RAM. The net effect is to give 65k color variations. My view is that nobody is going to display the Mona Lisa on this tiny display, so 16-bit color encoding would be rarely used. I did not include support for it in the driver software, but you could easily add it if you desire. The Epson S1D15G00 controller supports the 8-bit and 12-bit modes, but not the 16-bit mode.
Wrap-Around and Auto Increment
The wrap-around feature is the cornerstone of the controllers design and it amazes me how many people ignored it in drawing rectangles and character fonts. This feature allows you to efficiently draw a character or fill a box with just a simple loop taking advantage of the wrap-around after writing the pixel in the last column and auto-incrementing to the next row. Remember how the pixel was addressed by defining a drawing box? If you are planning to draw an 8 x 8 character font, define the drawing box as 8 x 8 and do a simple loop on 64 successive pixels. The row and column addresses will automatically increment and wrap back when you come to the end of a row, as shown in Figure 11 below. The rules for Auto-incrementing and Wrap-Around are as follows. Set the column and row address to the bottom left of the drawing box. Set up a loop to do all the pixels in the box. Specifically, since three data bytes will specify the color for two pixels, the loop will typically iterate over the total number of pixels in the box. Writing three memory bytes will illuminate two pixels (12-bit resolution). Each pixel written automatically advances the column address. When the max column address pixel is done, the column address wraps back to the column starting address AND the row address increments by one. Now keep writing memory bytes until the next row is illuminated and so on.

Figure 11 shows the traversal of the drawing box. (131,0) (131,131)
Rows 8x8 box of Pixels at (4, 2) to (11,9) X

Y Columns

Figure 11. Drawing Box permits auto-increment and wrap-around. To illustrate this technique, Figure 12 shows the code to fill an 8 x 8 box shown above. Note that we set the row and column address just once (pointing to the lower left corner). Then we do a single Memory Write command followed by three data bytes done 33 times. The grand total is 106 SPI transmissions. Compare that to the implementation where you address each pixel, set Memory Write and feed two bytes of color data for each pixel. The grand total would be 576 SPI transmissions. The advantage gained using the auto-increment and wrap-around features is obvious. // Row address set (command 0x2B) WriteSpiCommand(PASET); WriteSpiData(4); WriteSpiData(11); // Column address set (command 0x2A) WriteSpiCommand(CASET); WriteSpiData(2); WriteSpiData(9); // Write Memory (command 0x2C) WriteSpiCommand(RAMWR);
Add one to account for possible round-off error in the divide by 2
// loop on total number of pixels / 2 for (i = 0; i < ((((11 - 4 + 1) * (9 - 2 + 1)) / 2) + 1); i++) { // use the color value to output three data bytes covering two pixels WriteSpiData((color >> 4) & 0xFF); WriteSpiData(((color & 0xF) << 4) | ((color >> 8) & 0xF)); WriteSpiData(color & 0xFF); } Figure 12. Code Snippet to Fill an 8 x 8 box Code to use this technique to draw a character font is similar, but at each pixel you have to determine if the font calls for a foreground color or the background color.
Initializing the LCD Display (Philips PCF8833)
This was a surprise to me but the Philips PCF8833 does not quite boot into a ready to display mode after hardware reset. The following is the minimal commands/data needed to place it into 12-bit color mode. First, we do a hardware reset with a simple manipulation of the port pin. Reset is asserted low on this controller. // Hardware reset LCD_RESET_LOW; Delay(20000); LCD_RESET_HIGH; Delay(20000); The controller boots into SLEEPIN mode, which keeps the booster circuits off. We need to exit sleep mode which will also turn on all the voltage booster circuits. // Sleep out (command 0x11) WriteSpiCommand(SLEEPOUT); This is still a mystery to me, but I had to invert the display and reverse the RGB setting to get the colors to work correctly in this particular display. If you have trouble, consider removing this command. // Inversion on (command 0x20) WriteSpiCommand(INVON);

// // // // // // // // // // // // // //
********************************************************************************************* InitSpi( ) Sets up SPI channel 0 for communications to Nokia 6610 LCD Display I/O ports used: PA2 PA12 PA16 PA17 PA18 PB20 = = = = = = LCD Reset (set to low to reset) LCD chip select (set to low to select the LCD chip) SPI0_MISO Master In - Slave Out (not used in LCD interface) SPI0_MOSI Master Out - Slave In pin (Serial Data to LCD slave) SPI0_SPCK Serial Clock (to LCD slave) backlight control (normally PWM control, 1 = full on)
Author: Olimex, James P Lynch July 7, 2007 *********************************************************************************************
void InitSpi(void) { // Pin PB20 used for LCD_BL (backlight) pPIOB->PIO_OER = BIT20; // Configure PB20 as output pPIOB->PIO_SODR = BIT20; // Set PB20 to HIGH (backlight under PWM control - this will turn it full on) // Pin PA2 used for LCD_RESET pPIOA->PIO_OER = BIT2; // Configure PA2 as output pPIOA->PIO_SODR = BIT2; // Set PA2 to HIGH (assert LCD Reset low then high to reset the controller) // Pin PA2 used for CS_LCD (chip select) pPIOA->PIO_OER = BIT12; // Configure PA12 as output pPIOA->PIO_SODR = BIT12; // Set PA12 to HIGH (assert CS_LCD low to enable transmission) // Disable the following pins from PIO control (will // BIT12 = PA12 -> SPI0_NPCS0 chip select // BIT16 = PA16 -> SPI0_MISO Master In - Slave Out // BIT17 = PA17 -> SPI0_MOSI Master Out - Slave In // BIT18 = PA18 -> SPI0_SPCK Serial Clock (to LCD pPIOA->PIO_PDR = BIT12 | BIT16 | BIT17 | BIT18; // pPIOA->PIO_ASR = BIT12 | BIT16 | BIT17 | BIT18; // pPIOA->PIO_BSR = 0; // //enable the SPI0 Peripheral clock pPMC->PMC_PCER = 1 << AT91C_ID_SPI0; // SPI Control Register SPI_CR pSPI->SPI_CR = AT91C_SPI_SWRST | AT91C_SPI_SPIEN; //Software reset, SPI Enable pSPI->SPI_CR = AT91C_SPI_SPIEN; //SPI Enable (0x01) // SPI Mode Register SPI_MR = 0xE0011 pSPI->SPI_MR = (AT91C_SPI_DLYBCS & (0 << 24)) | (AT91C_SPI_PCS & (0xE << 16)) | (0x81) be used instead by the SPI0 peripheral) (not used in LCD interface) pin (Serial Data to LCD slave) slave) Peripheral A Disable Register (Disable PIO control) Peripheral A Select Register (all 4 bits are in PIOA) Peripheral B Select Register (no bits in PIOB)

// ************************************************************************************* // LCDSetPixel.c // // Lights a single pixel in the specified color at the specified x and y addresses // // Inputs: x = row address (0. 131) // y = column address (0. 131) // color = 12-bit color value rrrrggggbbbb // rrrr = 1111 full red // : // 0000 red is off // // gggg = 1111 full green // : // 0000 green is off // // bbbb = 1111 full blue // : // 0000 blue is off // // Returns: nothing // // Note: see lcd.h for some sample color settings // // Author: James P Lynch July 7, 2007 // ************************************************************************************* void LCDSetPixel(int x, int y, int color) { LCDSetXY(x, y); WriteSpiCommand(RAMWR); WriteSpiData((unsigned char)((color >> 4) & 0xFFFF)); WriteSpiData((unsigned char)(((color & 0x0F) << 4) | 0x00)); WriteSpiCommand(NOP); } // ************************************************************************************************* // LCDSetLine.c // // Draws a line in the specified color from (x0,y0) to (x1,y1) // // Inputs: x = row address (0. 131) // y = column address (0. 131) // color = 12-bit color value rrrrggggbbbb // rrrr = 1111 full red // : // 0000 red is off // // gggg = 1111 full green // : // 0000 green is off // // bbbb = 1111 full blue // : // 0000 blue is off // // Returns: nothing // // Note: good write-up on this algorithm in Wikipedia (search for Bresenham's line algorithm) // see lcd.h for some sample color settings // // Authors: Dr. Leonard McMillan, Associate Professor UNC // Jack Bresenham IBM, Winthrop University (Father of this algorithm, 1962) // // Note: taken verbatim from Professor McMillan's presentation: // http://www.cs.unc.edu/~mcmillan/comp136/Lecture6/Lines.html // // ************************************************************************************************* void LCDSetLine(int x0, int y0, int x1, int y1, int color) { int dy = y1 - y0; int dx = x1 - x0; int stepx, stepy;
if (dy < 0) { dy = -dy; stepy = -1; } else { stepy = 1; } if (dx < 0) { dx = -dx; stepx = -1; } else { stepx = 1; } dy <<= 1; // dy is now 2*dy dx <<= 1; // dx is now 2*dx LCDSetPixel(x0, y0, color); if (dx > dy) { int fraction = dy - (dx >> 1); while (x0 != x1) { if (fraction >= 0) { y0 += stepy; fraction -= dx; } x0 += stepx; fraction += dy; LCDSetPixel(x0, y0, color); } } else { int fraction = dx - (dy >> 1); while (y0 != y1) { if (fraction >= 0) { x0 += stepx; fraction -= dy; } y0 += stepy; fraction += dx; LCDSetPixel(x0, y0, color); } } } // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // / // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // ***************************************************************************************** LCDSetRect.c Draws a rectangle in the specified color from (x1,y1) to (x2,y2) Rectangle can be filled with a color if desired Inputs: x y fill color = = = = row address (0. 131) column address (0. 131) 0=no fill, 1-fill entire rectangle 12-bit color value for lines rrrrggggbbbb rrrr = 1111 full red : 0000 red is off gggg = 1111 full green : 0000 green is off bbbb = 1111 full blue : 0000 blue is off Returns: nothing Notes: The best way to fill a rectangle is to take advantage of the "wrap-around" featute built into the Philips PCF8833 controller. By defining a drawing box, the memory can be simply filled by successive memory writes until all pixels have been illuminated. 1. Given the coordinates of two opposing corners (x0, y0) (x1, y1) calculate the minimums and maximums of the coordinates xmin xmax ymin ymax = = = = (x0 (x0 (y0 (y0 <= x1) ? x0 : x1; > x1) ? x0 : x1; <= y1) ? y0 : y1; > y1) ? y0 : y1; // same as 2*dy - dx

// ************************************************************************************************* // LCDPutStr.c // // Draws a null-terminates character string at the specified (x,y) address, size and color // // Inputs: pString = pointer to character string to be displayed // x = row address (0. 131) // y = column address (0. 131) // Size = font pitch (SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE) // fColor = 12-bit foreground color value rrrrggggbbbb // bColor = 12-bit background color value rrrrggggbbbb // // // Returns: nothing // // Notes: Here's an example to display "Hello World!" at address (20,20) // // LCDPutChar("Hello World!", 20, 20, LARGE, WHITE, BLACK); // // // Author: James P Lynch July 7, 2007 // ************************************************************************************************* void LCDPutStr(char *pString, int x, int y, int Size, int fColor, int bColor) { // loop until null-terminator is seen while (*pString != 0x00) { // draw the character LCDPutChar(*pString++, x, y, Size, fColor, bColor); // advance the y position if (Size == SMALL) y = y + 6; else if (Size == MEDIUM) y = y + 8; else y = y + 8; // bail out if y exceeds 131 if (y > 131) break; } } // ***************************************************************************** // Delay.c // // Simple for loop delay // // Inputs: a - loop count // // Author: James P Lynch June 27, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void Delay (unsigned long a) { while (--a!=0); }
// ********************************************************************************* // Font tables for Nokia 6610 LCD Display Driver (PCF8833 Controller) // // FONT6x8 - SMALL font (mostly 5x7) // FONT8x8 - MEDIUM font (8x8 characters, a bit thicker) // FONT8x16 - LARGE font (8x16 characters, thicker) // // Note: ASCII characters 0x00 through 0x1F are not included in these fonts. // First row of each font contains the number of columns, the // number of rows and the number of bytes per character. // // Author: Jim Parise, James P Lynch July 7, 2007 // ********************************************************************************* const unsigned char FONT6x8[97][8] = { 0x06,0x08,0x08,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x00, 0x50,0x50,0x50,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x50,0x50,0xF8,0x50,0xF8,0x50,0x50,0x00, 0x20,0x78,0xA0,0x70,0x28,0xF0,0x20,0x00, 0xC0,0xC8,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x98,0x18,0x00, 0x40,0xA0,0xA0,0x40,0xA8,0x90,0x68,0x00, 0x30,0x30,0x20,0x40,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x10,0x20,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x20,0x10,0x00, 0x40,0x20,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x00, 0x00,0x20,0xA8,0x70,0x70,0xA8,0x20,0x00, 0x00,0x20,0x20,0xF8,0x20,0x20,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x30,0x30,0x20,0x40, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0xF8,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x30,0x30,0x00, 0x00,0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x80,0x00,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0xA8,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x20,0x60,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x70,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x08,0x70,0x80,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0xF8,0x08,0x10,0x30,0x08,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x10,0x30,0x50,0x90,0xF8,0x10,0x10,0x00, 0xF8,0x80,0xF0,0x08,0x08,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x38,0x40,0x80,0xF0,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF8,0x08,0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x80,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x78,0x08,0x10,0xE0,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x20,0x40,0x00, 0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x20,0x10,0x08,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0xF8,0x00,0xF8,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x40,0x20,0x10,0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x08,0x30,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0xA8,0xB8,0xB0,0x80,0x78,0x00, 0x20,0x50,0x88,0x88,0xF8,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x00, 0xF8,0x80,0x80,0xF0,0x80,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0xF8,0x80,0x80,0xF0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x00, 0x78,0x88,0x80,0x80,0x98,0x88,0x78,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0xF8,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x70,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x70,0x00, 0x38,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x90,0x60,0x00, 0x88,0x90,0xA0,0xC0,0xA0,0x90,0x88,0x00, 0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0x88,0xD8,0xA8,0xA8,0xA8,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0xC8,0xA8,0x98,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x88,0xA8,0x90,0x68,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0xA0,0x90,0x88,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x80,0x70,0x08,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF8,0xA8,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x50,0x20,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0xA8,0xA8,0xA8,0x50,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x50,0x20,0x50,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x50,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00, 0xF8,0x08,0x10,0x70,0x40,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0x78,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x78,0x00, 0x00,0x80,0x40,0x20,0x10,0x08,0x00,0x00, 0x78,0x08,0x08,0x08,0x08,0x08,0x78,0x00, // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // columns, rows, num_bytes_per_char space 0x20 ! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + ,. / (forward slash) 0 0x: ; < = > ? @ 0x40 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P 0x50 Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ (back slash) ]

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: ; < = > ? @ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ ] ^ _ ` a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w

(back slash)

0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x63,0x36,0x1C,0x1C,0x1C,0x36,0x63,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x63,0x63,0x63,0x63,0x63,0x3F,0x03,0x06,0x3C,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x7F,0x66,0x0C,0x18,0x30,0x63,0x7F,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,

// // //

0x00,0x00,0x0E,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x70,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x0E,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x00,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x70,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x0E,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x70,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x3B,0x6E,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x70,0xD8,0xD8,0x70,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00};

// // // // //

{ | } ~ DEL
LCD.H (for Epson S1D15G00 Controller only)
This lcd.h include file contains the Epson commands and color specification codes.
#ifndef Lcd_h #define Lcd_h // ***************************************************************************** // lcd.h // // include file for Epson S1D15G00 LCD Controller // // // Author: James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define DISON DISOFF DISNOR DISINV COMSCN DISCTL SLPIN SLPOUT PASET CASET DATCTL RGBSET8 RAMWR RAMRD PTLIN PTLOUT RMWIN RMWOUT ASCSET SCSTART OSCON OSCOFF PWRCTR VOLCTR VOLUP VOLDOWN TMPGRD EPCTIN EPCOUT EPMWR EPMRD EPSRRD1 EPSRRD2 NOP 0xAF 0xAE 0xA6 0xA7 0xBB 0xCA 0x95 0x94 0x75 0x15 0xBC 0xCE 0x5C 0x5D 0xA8 0xA9 0xE0 0xEE 0xAA 0xAB 0xD1 0xD2 0x20 0x81 0xD6 0xD7 0x82 0xCD 0xCC 0xFC 0xFD 0x7C 0x7D 0x25 // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // Display on Display off Normal display Inverse display Common scan direction Display control Sleep in Sleep out Page address set Column address set Data scan direction, etc. 256-color position set Writing to memory Reading from memory Partial display in Partial display out Read and modify write End Area scroll set Scroll start set Internal oscillation on Internal oscillation off Power control Electronic volume control Increment electronic control by 1 Decrement electronic control by 1 Temperature gradient set Control EEPROM Cancel EEPROM control Write into EEPROM Read from EEPROM Read register 1 Read register 2 NOP instruction

// Pin PA2 used for LCD_RESET pPIOA->PIO_OER = BIT2; pPIOA->PIO_SODR = BIT2;
// Pin PA2 used for CS_LCD (chip select) pPIOA->PIO_OER = BIT12; // Configure PA12 as output pPIOA->PIO_SODR = BIT12; // Set PA12 to HIGH (assert CS_LCD low to enable transmission) // Disable the // BIT12 = // BIT16 = // BIT17 = // BIT18 = pPIOA->PIO_PDR pPIOA->PIO_ASR pPIOA->PIO_BSR following pins from PIO control (will be used instead by the SPI0 peripheral) PA12 -> SPI0_NPCS0 chip select PA16 -> SPI0_MISO Master In - Slave Out (not used in LCD interface) PA17 -> SPI0_MOSI Master Out - Slave In pin (Serial Data to LCD slave) PA18 -> SPI0_SPCK Serial Clock (to LCD slave) = BIT12 | BIT16 | BIT17 | BIT18; // Peripheral A Disable Register (Disable PIO control of these 4 bits) = BIT12 | BIT16 | BIT17 | BIT18; // Peripheral A Select Register (all 4 bits are in PIOA) = 0; // Peripheral B Select Register (none of the bits are in PIOB)
//enable the SPI0 Peripheral clock pPMC->PMC_PCER = 1 << AT91C_ID_SPI0;
// SPI Control Register SPI_CR pSPI->SPI_CR = AT91C_SPI_SWRST | AT91C_SPI_SPIEN; pSPI->SPI_CR = AT91C_SPI_SPIEN; // SPI Mode Register SPI_MR = 0xE0011 pSPI->SPI_MR = (AT91C_SPI_DLYBCS & (0 << 24)) | (AT91C_SPI_PCS & (0xE << 16)) | (AT91C_SPI_LLB & (0 << 7)) (AT91C_SPI_MODFDIS & (1 << 4)) (AT91C_SPI_PCSDEC & (0 << 2)) (AT91C_SPI_PS & (0 << 1)) (AT91C_SPI_MSTR & (1 << 0)); | | | |
//Software reset, SPI Enable //SPI Enable (0x01)

(0x81)

// Delay between chip selects (take default: 6 MCK periods) // Peripheral Chip Select (selects SPI_NPCS0 or PA12) // // // // Local Loopback Enabled (disabled) Mode Fault Detection (disabled) Chip Select Decode (chip selects connected directly to peripheral) Peripheral Select (fixed) // Master/Slave Mode (Master)
// SPI Chip Select Register SPI_CSR[0] = 0x01010311 pSPI->SPI_CSR[0] = (AT91C_SPI_DLYBCT & (0x01 << 24)) | // Delay between Consecutive Transfers (32 MCK periods) (AT91C_SPI_DLYBS & (0x01 << 16)) | // Delay Before SPCK (1 MCK period) (AT91C_SPI_SCBR & (0x10 << 8)) | // Serial Clock Baud Rate (baudrate = MCK/8 = 48054841/8 = 6006855 baud (AT91C_SPI_BITS & (AT91C_SPI_BITS_9)) | // Bits per Transfer (9 bits) (AT91C_SPI_CSAAT & (0x0 << 3)) | // Chip Select Active After Transfer (is active after xfer)/ (AT91C_SPI_NCPHA & (0x0 << 1)) | // Clock Phase (data captured on falling edge) (AT91C_SPI_CPOL & (0x01 << 0)); // Clock Polarity (inactive state is logic one)
// ***************************************************************************** // WriteSpiCommand.c // // Writes 9-bit command to LCD display via SPI interface // // Inputs: data - Epson S1D15G00 controller/driver command // // // Note: clears bit 8 to indicate command transfer // // Author: Olimex, James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void WriteSpiCommand(volatile unsigned int command) { // wait for the previous transfer to complete while((pSPI->SPI_SR & AT91C_SPI_TXEMPTY) == 0); // clear bit 8 - indicates a "command" command = (command & ~0x0100); // send the command pSPI->SPI_TDR = command;

} // // // // // // // // // // // //
***************************************************************************** WriteSpiData.c Writes 9-bit command to LCD display via SPI interface Inputs: Note: data Epson S1D15G00 controller/driver command
Author: Olimex, James P Lynch August 30, 2007 *****************************************************************************
void WriteSpiData(volatile unsigned int data) { // wait for the transfer to complete while((pSPI->SPI_SR & AT91C_SPI_TXEMPTY) == 0); // set bit 8, indicates "data" data = (data | 0x0100); // send the data pSPI->SPI_TDR = data;
// ***************************************************************************** // Backlight.c // // Turns the backlight on and off // // Inputs: state - 1 = backlight on // 2 = backlight off // // // Author: Olimex, James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void Backlight(unsigned char state) { if(state == 1) pPIOB->PIO_SODR else pPIOB->PIO_CODR = BIT20; = BIT20; // Set PB20 to HIGH // Set PB20 to LOW
// ***************************************************************************** // InitLcd.c // // Initializes the Epson S1D15G00 LCD Controller // // Inputs: none // // Author: James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void InitLcd(void) { // Hardware reset LCD_RESET_LOW; Delay(10000); LCD_RESET_HIGH; Delay(10000); // Display control WriteSpiCommand(DISCTL); WriteSpiData(0x00); // P1: 0x00 = 2 divisions, switching period=8 (default) WriteSpiData(0x20); // P2: 0x20 = nlines/4 - 1 = 132/4 - 1 = 32) WriteSpiData(0x00); // P3: 0x00 = no inversely highlighted lines // COM scan WriteSpiCommand(COMSCN); WriteSpiData(1); // P1: 0x01 = Scan 1->80, 160<-81 // Internal oscilator ON WriteSpiCommand(OSCON); // Sleep out WriteSpiCommand(SLPOUT); // Power control WriteSpiCommand(PWRCTR); WriteSpiData(0x0f); // reference voltage regulator on, circuit voltage follower on, BOOST ON // Inverse display WriteSpiCommand(DISINV); // Data control WriteSpiCommand(DATCTL); WriteSpiData(0x01); // P1: 0x01 = page address inverted, column address normal, address scan in column direction WriteSpiData(0x00); // P2: 0x00 = RGB sequence (default value) WriteSpiData(0x02); // P3: 0x02 = Grayscale -> 16 (selects 12-bit color, type A) // Voltage control (contrast setting) WriteSpiCommand(VOLCTR); WriteSpiData(32); // P1 = 32 volume value (experiment with this value to get the best contrast) WriteSpiData(3); // P2 = 3 resistance ratio (only value that works) // allow power supply to stabilize Delay(100000); // turn on the display WriteSpiCommand(DISON);

// ************************************************************************************************* // LCDSetLine.c // // Draws a line in the specified color from (x0,y0) to (x1,y1) // // Inputs: x = row address (0. 131) // y = column address (0. 131) // color = 12-bit color value rrrrggggbbbb // rrrr = 1111 full red // : // 0000 red is off // // gggg = 1111 full green // : // 0000 green is off // // bbbb = 1111 full blue // : // 0000 blue is off // // Returns: nothing // // Note: good write-up on this algorithm in Wikipedia (search for Bresenham's line algorithm) // see lcd.h for some sample color settings // // Authors: Dr. Leonard McMillan, Associate Professor UNC // Jack Bresenham IBM, Winthrop University (Father of this algorithm, 1962) // // Note: taken verbatim from Professor McMillan's presentation: // http://www.cs.unc.edu/~mcmillan/comp136/Lecture6/Lines.html // // ************************************************************************************************* void LCDSetLine(int x0, int y0, int x1, int y1, int color) { int dy = y1 - y0; int dx = x1 - x0; int stepx, stepy;

if if dy dx

(dy (dx <<= <<=
< 0) { dy = -dy; < 0) { dx = -dx; 1; 1;
stepy = -1; } stepx = -1; } // dy is now // dx is now
else { stepy = 1; } else { stepx = 1; } 2*dy 2*dx
} // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
LCDSetPixel(x0, y0, color); if (dx > dy) { int fraction = dy - (dx >> 1); // same as 2*dy - dx while (x0 != x1) { if (fraction >= 0) { y0 += stepy; fraction -= dx; // same as fraction -= 2*dx } x0 += stepx; fraction += dy; // same as fraction -= 2*dy LCDSetPixel(x0, y0, color); } } else { int fraction = dx - (dy >> 1); while (y0 != y1) { if (fraction >= 0) { x0 += stepx; fraction -= dy; } y0 += stepy; fraction += dx; LCDSetPixel(x0, y0, color); } }
***************************************************************************************** LCDSetRect.c Draws a rectangle in the specified color from (x1,y1) to (x2,y2) Rectangle can be filled with a color if desired Inputs: x y fill color = = = = row address (0. 131) column address (0. 131) 0=no fill, 1-fill entire rectangle 12-bit color value for lines rrrrggggbbbb rrrr = 1111 full red : 0000 red is off gggg = 1111 full green : 0000 green is off bbbb = 1111 full blue : 0000 blue is off Returns: Notes: The best way to fill a rectangle is to take advantage of the "wrap-around" featute built into the Epson S1D15G00 controller. By defining a drawing box, the memory can be simply filled by successive memory writes until all pixels have been illuminated. 1. Given the coordinates of two opposing corners (x0, y0) (x1, y1) calculate the minimums and maximums of the coordinates xmin xmax ymin ymax = = = = (x0 (x0 (y0 (y0 <= x1) ? x0 : x1; > x1) ? x0 : x1; <= y1) ? y0 : y1; > y1) ? y0 : y1; nothing

// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
3. Calculate the number of pixels to be written divided by 2 NumPixels = ((((xmax - xmin + 1) * (ymax - ymin + 1)) / 2) + 1) You may notice that I added one pixel to the formula. This covers the case where the number of pixels is odd and we would lose one pixel due to rounding error. In the case of odd pixels, the number of pixels is exact. in the case of even pixels, we have one more pixel than needed, but it cannot be displayed because it is outside the drawing box. We divide by 2 because two pixels are represented by three bytes. So we work through the rectangle two pixels at a time. 4. Now a simple memory write loop will fill the rectangle for (i = 0; i < ((((xmax - xmin + 1) * (ymax - ymin + 1)) / 2) + 1); i++) { WriteSpiData((color >> 4) & 0xFF); WriteSpiData(((color & 0xF) << 4) | ((color >> 8) & 0xF)); WriteSpiData(color & 0xFF); } In the case of an unfilled rectangle, drawing four lines with the Bresenham line drawing algorithm is reasonably efficient. Author: James P Lynch August 30, 2007 *****************************************************************************************
void LCDSetRect(int x0, int y0, int x1, int y1, unsigned char fill, int color) { int xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax; int i; // check if the rectangle is to be filled if (fill == FILL) { // best way to create a filled rectangle is to define a drawing box // and loop two pixels at a time // calculate the min and max for x and y directions xmin = (x0 <= x1) ? x0 : x1; xmax = (x0 > x1) ? x0 : x1; ymin = (y0 <= y1) ? y0 : y1; ymax = (y0 > y1) ? y0 : y1; // specify the controller drawing box according to those limits // Row address set (command 0x2B) WriteSpiCommand(PASET); WriteSpiData(xmin); WriteSpiData(xmax); // Column address set (command 0x2A) WriteSpiCommand(CASET); WriteSpiData(ymin); WriteSpiData(ymax); // WRITE MEMORY WriteSpiCommand(RAMWR); // loop on total number of pixels / 2 for (i = 0; i < ((((xmax - xmin + 1) * (ymax - ymin + 1)) / 2) + 130); i++) { // use the color value to output three data bytes covering two pixels WriteSpiData((color >> 4) & 0xFF); WriteSpiData(((color & 0xF) << 4) | ((color >> 8) & 0xF)); WriteSpiData(color & 0xFF);

} } else {

// best way to LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x1,
draw un y0, x1, y1, x1, y0, x0, y0, x1,
unfilled rectangle is to draw four lines y0, color); y1, color); y1, color); y1, color);

Returns:

// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
: ; < = > ? @ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ (back slash) ] ^ _ ` a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z { | } ~ DEL
Sample Main Program Test Routine
The following is a simple main program that exercises every one of the LCD graphics primitives. It works with the driver code for either the Philips controller or the Epson controller. After the tests have been completed, the main program falls into an endless blink loop. Since the SAM7-EX256 board has no user-programmable LED, the author added one as shown in the programs annotation (you could remove the LED code if you like).
// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
***************************************************************************************************** main.c Nokia 6610 LCD demonstration program for Olimex SAM7-EX256 Evaluation Board Performs a series of tests of the LCD driver. When tests are complete, blinks LED4 (pin PA3) with an endless loop PA3 is pin 1 on the EXT 20-pin connector (3.3v is pin 18) The Olimex SAM7-EX256 board has no programmable LEDs. Added a simple test LED from Radio Shack as shown below (attached to the 20-pin EXT connector.) 3.3 volts |---------| anode |----| PA3 EXT O------| 470 ohm |------------------|LED |--------------O EXT Pin 18 |---------| |----| cathode pin 1 Radio Shack Red LED 276-026 T-1 size (anode is the longer wire) LED current: I = E/R = 3.3/470 =.007 amps = 7 ma Note: most PIO pins can drive 8 ma on the AT91SAM7X256, so we're OK
Author: James P Lynch July 7, 2007 ******************************************************************************************************
// ******************************************************* // Header Files // ******************************************************* #include "AT91SAM7X256.h" #include "lcd.h" #include "board.h" // ******************************************************* // External References // ******************************************************* extern void LowLevelInit(void); int main (void) { unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned int char long long long long int j; k; col; row; IdleCount = 0; TempColor[11] = { WHITE, BLACK, RED, GREEN, BLUE, CYAN, MAGENTA, YELLOW, BROWN, ORANGE, PINK }; *TempChar[11] = { "White", "Black", "Red", "Green", "Blue", "Cyan", "Magenta", "Yellow", "Brown", "Orange", "Pink" };

When the main program runs, a series of color filled rectangles is displayed with the name of the color annotated at the bottom of the screen, as shown in Figure 13 below. The colors displayed are:
"White", "Black", "Red", "Green", "Blue", "Cyan", "Magenta", "Yellow", "Brown", "Orange", "Pink"
If you are curious as to how I developed my color values, I referred to this web site:
http://web.njit.edu/~kevin/rgb.txt.html
In this web site, RGB to Color Name Mapping (Triplet and Hex), there is a decimal color table where each color value is in the range 0 to 255. I simply used proportionality to convert these values to a range of 0 to 15. This may come in handy when you need to display the color Turquoise!
Figure 13. Filled Rectangle

Figure 14.

Text and Graphics
In Figure 14 above, the display shows various rectangles (filled and unfilled), lines and circles. The three font sizes are demonstrated and you can see some single pixel specifications on the far right. In Figure 15 below, the Olimex BMP image has been displayed with a few overlays of text. Olimex has a free utility on their web site to convert pictures (.jpeg) into the 132 x 132 motif required by the Nokia 6100 LCD display. The text overlays demonstrate foreground and background color specification.
Figure 15. Display of a.bmp image with text
There is available with this tutorial two sample Eclipse projects; one for the Philips controller and one for the Epson controller. They are almost identical, save for the list of command codes in the file lcd.h and the InitLcd( ) routine in the file lcd.c. You need only determine your controller type and then pick the appropriate example to use.

Conclusions

I set out to write a Nokia 6100 LCD Display Driver that was 100% related to the Philips and Epson Data Sheets. I generally succeeded but there is still the mystery of why the display needed to be inverted and the RGB setting had to be reversed. The subroutines contained herein are the most efficient for this particular controller. If you need to port this to a different computational platform, then you need to modify the port pins used and rewrite the SPI routines to conform to the alternate microprocessor. I suspect most people could easily handle such details. I would appreciate comments on this work and would be happy to accept any suggested improvements for inclusion in a future release.

doc1

Loudspeaker

The loudspeaker allows you to use your phone as a speakerphone, also during a conference call. See Loudspeaker on page 35.
General Packet Radio Service (GPRS)
Your phone supports Java technology and includes some MIDP Java applications and games that have been specially designed for mobile phones. You can download new applications and games to your phone from a PC with a Java installer software or from WAP services, e.g. from Club Nokia. See Applications (Menu 10) on page 90.
Nokia OTA settings service
In order to use WAP, MMS, GPRS and other wireless services you need to set proper settings in your phone. You may receive the settings directly as an OTA (Over The Air) message and you only need to save the settings. For more information and availability of the settings, contact your nearest authorised Nokia dealer.

Shared memory

The following features in this phone may share memory: phone book, text and multimedia messages, images and ringing tones in gallery, calendar, to-do notes, personal notes in wallet, and Java games and applications. Using any such features may reduce the memory available for any features sharing memory. This is especially true with heavy use of any of the features (although some of the features may have a certain amount of memory specially allotted to them in addition to the amount of memory shared with other features). For example, saving many images, java apps, etc. may take all of the shared memory and your phone may display a message that the memory is full. In this case, delete some of the information or entries stored in the shared memory features before continuing.

MIDP JavaTM applications

Your phone

Keys and connectors

1. Power key Switches the phone on and off. For example, when the keypad is locked, pressing the power key briefly turns the phones display lights on for approximately 15 seconds. 2. Volume keys Keys to adjust the earpiece, headset and loudspeaker volume. 3. Selection keys and The function of the keys depends on the guiding text shown on the display above the keys, for example, Menu and Names in standby mode. 4. 4-way scroll key with , , and Enables scrolling through names, phone numbers, menus or settings and in the calendar. In standby mode, pressing opens the Create message menu and pressing opens the Calendar menu.

1. Your phone

6. 7. -
ends an active call. Exits from any function. enter numbers and characters. are used for various purposes in different functions. and
1. Charger connector 2. Pop-PortTM connector for headset and data cable, for example 3. Infrared (IR) port

Indicates the selected phone line, if you have two phone lines. See Line for outgoing calls on page 76. The loudspeaker has been activated, see Loudspeaker on page 35. Calls are limited to a closed user group. See Security settings on page 82. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 22
The phones keypad is locked. See Keypad lock (Keyguard) on page 29.
Headset, handsfree or loopset accessory is connected to the phone. To set the phone to show the time and date in standby mode, see Clock on page 73 and Date on page 74.
Putting on the wrist strap
Thread the strap as shown in the picture and then tighten it.
The timed profile is selected. See Profiles (Menu 4) on page 72.

Getting started

Installing the SIM card and the battery
Keep all miniature SIM cards out of the reach of small children.
The SIM card and its contacts can easily be damaged by scratches or bending, so be careful when handling, inserting or removing the card. Before removing the battery switch off the phone. 1. To remove the back cover from the phone: With the back of the phone facing you, push the back cover release button (1) and slide the back cover off (2). Remove the battery by lifting it with the finger grip (3).

2. Getting started

3. Insert the SIM card into the SIM card holder (6). Make sure that the SIM card is properly inserted and that the golden contact area on the card is positioned as shown.
2. To release the SIM card holder, gently pull the locking clip of the card holder (4) and open it (5).
5. Insert the battery (8).
6. Slide the back cover into its place (9).
4. Close the SIM card holder (7) and press it until it snaps into position.
1. Connect the lead from the charger to the socket on the bottom of your phone. 2. Connect the charger to an AC wall socket. The text Charging is displayed briefly if the phone is switched on. If the battery is completely empty, it may take a few minutes before the charging indicator appears on the display or any calls can be made. You can use the phone while the charger is connected. The charging time depends on the charger and the battery used. For example, charging a BL-4C battery with the ACP-12 charger takes up to one hour and 30 minutes in standby mode.
Switching the phone on and off

to end the call.

Press Silence, if available, to mute the ringing tone. Then either answer or reject the call. If the headset HDB-4 is connected to the phone, you can answer and end a call by pressing the headset key. Tip: If the Divert if busy function is activated to divert the calls, for example to your voice mailbox, rejecting an incoming call will also divert the call. See Call divert on page 74.

Call waiting

During a call, press active call. to answer the waiting call. The first call is put on hold. Press to end the
To activate the Call waiting function, see Call waiting on page 75.

Options during a call

Many of the options that you can use during a call, are network services. Press Options during a call for some of the following options: Mute or Unmute, End call, End all calls, Phone book, Menu and Hold or Unhold, New call, Conference, Private, Answer, Reject and Loudspeaker or Handset. Lock keypad to activate the keypad lock.
Answering or rejecting an incoming call
Swap to switch between the active call and the call on hold, Transfer to connect a call on hold to an active call, and disconnect yourself from the calls.

Loudspeaker

You can use your phone as a loudspeaker during a call. Do not hold the phone to your ear during loudspeaker operation. To activate the loudspeaker, press Options and select Loudspeaker, or press Loudsp., if available. To deactivate the loudspeaker during a call, press Options and select Handset, or press Handset, if available. If you have connected the handsfree unit CARK126 or the headset to the phone, Handset in the options list is replaced with Handsfree or Headset and the selection key Handset with Handsfr. or Headset, respectively. The loudspeaker is automatically deactivated when you end the call or call attempt or connect the handsfree unit or headset to the phone.
Send DTMF to send DTMF tone strings, for example, passwords or bank account numbers. Key in the DTMF string or search for it in the phone book and press OK. Note that you can key in the wait character w and the pause character p by repeatedly pressing.

Writing text

You can key in text, for example when writing messages, using the traditional or predictive text input. When you are writing text, the predictive text input is indicated by and the traditional text input by at the top left of the display. The character case is indicated by , , or next to the text input indicator. You can change the character case by pressing. The number mode is indicated by , and you can change between the letter and number mode by pressing and holding.

Note: When sending e-mails via the SMS network service, your phone may display the words Message sent. This is an indication that the e-mail has been sent by your phone to the e-mail server. This is not an indication that the e-mail has been received at the intended destination. For more details about e-mail services, check with your service provider.
Writing and sending an e-mail
When you have received a message or an e-mail, the indicator followed by messages received is shown.
and the number of new messages
Received messages are automatically stored in shared memory, see Shared memory on page 18. The blinking indicates that the message memory is full. Before you can receive new messages, delete old messages. 1. Press Show to view the message, or press Exit to view it later. Reading the message later: Press Menu, and select Messages, Text messages and Inbox. 2. If more than one message is received, select the message you want to read. An unread text message is indicated by in front of it. 3. While reading or viewing the message, press Options. You can select, for example, an option to delete, forward or edit the message as a text message or an e-mail, move and rename the message you are reading. Select Copy to calendar to copy text from the beginning of the message to your phones calendar as a reminder note for the current day. Select Message details to view the senders name and phone number, the message centre used, reception date and time. Select Use detail to extract numbers, e-mail addresses and website addresses from the current message. When reading a picture message, select Save picture to save the picture in the Templates folder.
Reading and replying to a message or an e-mail
When replying to an e-mail, first confirm or edit e-mail address and subject. Write your reply message. 5. Press Options, select Send, and press OK to send the message to the displayed number.

Inbox and outbox folders

The phone saves the incoming text messages in the Inbox folder and the sent messages in the Sent items folder of the Text messages submenu. The text messages you want to send later, can be saved in the Archive, My folders or Templates folder.

Templates

Your phone offers you text templates, indicated with , and picture templates, indicated with. To access the template list, press Menu, and select Messages, Text messages and Templates. Inserting a text template in a message or in an e-mail When you are writing or replying to a message, or an e-mail, press Options. Select Use template and select the template you want to insert. Inserting a picture in a text message When you are writing or replying to a message, press Options. Select Insert picture and select a picture to view it. Press Insert to insert the picture into your message. The indicator on the header of the message indicates that a picture has been attached. The number of characters that you can enter in a message, depends on the size of the picture. To view the text and the picture together before sending the message, press Options and select Preview. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 51

Multimedia messages

Note: This function can be used only if it is supported by your network operator or service provider. Only phones that offer multimedia message features can receive and display multimedia messages.
A multimedia message can contain text, picture and sound. The phone supports multimedia messages of size up to 45 KB. If that maximum size is exceeded, the phone may not be able to receive the message. Depending on the network, you may receive a text message including an Internet address where you can view the multimedia message. If the message contains a picture, the phone scales them down to fit the display area.
Delete name to delete the selected name in the distribution list.
Multimedia messaging supports the following formats: Picture: JPEG, GIF, PNG, and BMP. Sound: Scalable Polyphonic MIDI (SP-MIDI) and monophonic ringing tones. If the received message contains any unsupported elements, they may be replaced with the file name and the text Object format not supported Note that you are not able to receive any multimedia messages if you have a call in progress, a game or another Java application running, or an active WAP connection over GSM data (see Keying in the service settings manually on page 103). Because delivery of multimedia messages can fail for a variety of reasons, do not rely solely upon them for essential communications.
Writing and sending a multimedia message
To set the settings needed for multimedia messaging, see Settings for the multimedia messages on page 61. For availability and subscription to the multimedia messaging service, contact your network operator or service provider. 1. Press Menu, and select Messages, Multimedia msgs. and Create message. 2. Key in a message. See Writing text on page 36. You can insert one picture in a multimedia message. To insert a picture, press Options, and select Insert image. The list of available folders in the Gallery is shown. To open the desired folder, select it and then select the desired picture. The indicator on the header of the message indicate that a picture has been attached. To insert a name from the phone book, press Options and select More options and Insert name. Scroll to the desired name, press Options and select Insert name. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 54
Note: If Allow multimedia reception is set to Yes or In home network, your operator or service provider may charge you for every message you receive.

Reply to reply to a message. To send the reply message, press Options and select Send. Senders phone number (or e-mail address) is used as the default value.
Received messages are automatically stored in shared memory, see Shared memory on page 18. When you have a multimedia message waiting and the memory for the messages is full, the indicator is blinking and Multimedia memory full, view waiting msg. is shown. To view the waiting message, press Show. To save the message, press Options, select Save message and delete old messages by first selecting the folder and then an oId message to be deleted. To discard the waiting message, press Exit and Yes. If you press No, you can view the message.

Erasing messages

1. To delete the text messages, press Menu, and select Messages, Text messages and Delete messages. To delete the multimedia messages, press Menu, and select Messages, Multimedia msgs. and Delete messages. 2. To delete all messages from a folder, select the folder where you want to delete the messages and press OK. If the folder contains unread messages, the phone will ask whether you want to delete them also. To delete all messages from all text message folders, select All messages and when Delete all messages from all folders? is displayed, press OK. If the folders contain unread messages, the phone will ask whether you want to delete them also.
Multimedia messages memory full
You can have a conversation with another person using this text messaging application. You cannot save received or sent messages, but you can view them while chatting. Each chat message is priced as a text message. 1. To start a chat, press Menu, select Messages and Chat. Key in or search in the phone book the phone number of the person with whom you want to start the chat session and press OK. Another way to start a chat: When you have received a message, press Show to read it. To start a chat, press Options and select Chat. 2. Key in your nickname for the chat and press OK. 3. Write your chat message, see Writing text on page 36. 4. To send the message, press Options and select Send. 5. The reply message from the other person is shown above your original message. To reply to the message, press OK and repeat the steps 3 and 4. 6. To end the chat session, press OK and select Quit. To view the latest messages of the current chat session, press Options and select Chat history. The messages you sent are indicated by "<" and your nickname and the messages you received by ">", and the senders nickname. Press Back to return to the message you are writing. To edit your nickname, select the option Chat name.
Voice mailbox is a network service and you may need to subscribe to it first. For more information and for the voice mailbox number, contact your service provider. Press Menu, and select Messages and Voice messages. Select Listen to voice messages to call your voice mailbox at the phone number you have saved within the Voice mailbox number menu. Each phone line may have its own voice mailbox number, see Line for outgoing calls on page 76. Voice mailbox number to key in, search for or edit your voice mailbox number and press OK to save it. If supported by the network, the indicator your voice mailbox number. Tip: Pressing and holding will indicate new voice messages. Press Listen to call

Alarm clock (Menu 6)

The alarm clock uses the time format set for the clock. The alarm clock works even when the phone is switched off. Press Menu, and select Alarm clock. Key in the alarm time and press OK. To change the time when the alarm time is set, select On. When the alarm time expires The phone will sound an alert tone, and flash Alarm! and the current time on the display. Press Stop to stop the alarm. If you let the phone continue to alarm for a minute or press Snooze, the alarm stops for about ten minutes and then resumes.
If the alarm time is reached while the phone is switched off, the phone switches itself on and starts sounding the alarm tone. If you press Stop, the phone asks whether you want to activate the phone , Switch the phone on?. Press No to switch off the phone or Yes to switch on the phone. Note: Do not press Yes when wireless phone use is prohibited or when it may cause interference or danger.

Restore factory settings

Note: Your phone must be switched on to use this function. Do not switch the phone on when wireless phone use is prohibited or when it may cause interference or danger.
You can save images and ringing tones, for example, if received in a multimedia message, in the folders of the gallery, see Reading and replying to a multimedia message on page 55. The gallery uses shared memory, see Shared memory on page 18. 1. Press Menu and select Gallery. The list of options is shown. 2. Select View folders to open the list of folders. Other options available are: Add folder to add a new folder. Key in a name for the folder and press OK. Delete folder to select the folder you want to delete. You can not delete the original folders in the phone. Rename folder to select the folder you want to give a new name. You can not rename the original folders in the phone. Gallery services to download more images and tones. Select Image services or Tone services, respectively. The list of available WAP bookmarks is shown. Select More bookmarks to access the list of WAP bookmarks in the Services menu, see Bookmarks on page 110. Select the appropriate bookmark to connect to the desired WAP page. If the connection fails, you may not be able to access the WAP page from the WAP service whose connection settings are currently active. In this case, enter the Services menu and activate another set of service

Note that Nokia does not warrant for applications from non-Nokia sites. If you choose to download Java applications from them, you should take the same precautions, for security or content, as you would with any site.
Service settings for some applications that need specific service settings. Your phone is set to use as default the service settings for the browser.
The following texts may appear during a download or during an operation of a Java application: Action failed , too many applications in the phone. Erase any unwanted application and download again. Application error , an error occurs in the running application. Application not supported , the application is incompatible with the phone. Call in progress , the application tries to establish a web connection while the phone is already in call. File format not recognised , either the application is invalid or the transfer from PC has not finished. File too large , a file is too large to run on the phone or the gateway does not support large files. Invalid file , the application is invalid. Launch failed , the phone couldn't start the application. Please try again. Unable to run application , there is insufficient resource to run the application. End any active calls or features and try to open the application again. Unknown (appearing in the Application's list), the application has no name.
Memory status for applications
To view the size of memory available for game and application installations, press Menu, and select Applications and Memory. The applications use shared memory, see Shared memory on page 18. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 93
Note that when downloading a game or an application, it may be saved in Games menu instead of the Applications menu.
Note: Your phone must be switched on to use the functions in Extras menu. Do not switch the phone on when wireless phone use is prohibited or when it may cause interference or danger.

Calculator

The calculator in your phone adds, subtracts, multiplies, divides, counts the square and the square root and converts currency values.
This calculator has a limited accuracy and rounding errors may occur, especially in long divisions.
1. Press Menu, and select Extras and Calculator. 2. When 0 is displayed on the screen, key in the first number in the calculation, press decimal point. Tip: Alternatively, press times to divide. 4. Key in the second number. 5. For a total, press Options and select Equals. Repeat steps 3 to 5 as many times as is necessary. 6. To start a new calculation, first press and hold Clear. for a

Connectivity (Menu 12)

GPRS connection
You can set the phone to automatically register to a GPRS network when you switch the phone on. Press Menu, and select Connectivity, GPRS, GPRS connection and Always online. Starting a WAP or PC dial-up application, or sending/receiving multimedia messages creates the connection between phone and network and data transfer is possible. When you end the application, GPRS connection is ended but the registration to the GPRS network remains. If you select When needed, the GPRS connection is established when an application needs it and closed when you end the application.

GPRS modem settings

You can connect the phone via infrared or data cable connection to a compatible PC and use the phone as a modem to enable GPRS connectivity from the PC. Press Menu, and select Connectivity, GPRS and GPRS modem settings. Select Active access point and activate the access point you want to use. Select Edit active access point to change the access point settings. Scroll to Alias for access point and press Select. Key in the name you would like for the activated access point and press OK. Scroll to GPRS access point and press Select. Key in the Access Point Name (APN) and press OK. An access point name is needed to establish a connection to a GPRS network. You can obtain the Access Point Name from your network operator or service provider. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 101
blinks, your phone is trying to connect to the other device or a connection has been lost.

Services (Menu 13)

You can access various WAP services such as banking, news, weather reports and flight times. These services are specially designed for mobile phones and they are maintained by WAP service providers. Check the availability of WAP services, pricing and tariffs with your network operator and/or the service provider whose service you wish to use. Service providers will also give you instructions on how to use their services.
WAP services use the Wireless Mark-Up Language (WML) on their WAP pages. Internet web pages cannot be viewed on your phone.
Basic steps for accessing and using WAP services
1. Save the service settings that are needed to access the WAP service that you want to use. See page 109. 2. Make a connection to the given WAP service. See page 106. 3. Start browsing the pages of the WAP service. See page 107. 4. Once you are finished browsing, end the connection to the WAP service. See page 108. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved.
You can also set the GPRS dial-up service settings (Access Point Name) on your PC by using the Nokia Modem Options software, see PC Suite on page 117. If you have set the settings both on your PC and on your phone, note that the settings set on the PC will be used.

To enter letters and numbers, press the keys key.

Options while browsing

Press Options and select one of the options available. The service provider may also offer other options. Select Home to go back to the homepage of the WAP service. Bookmarks. See page 110. Call / Edit / Open row / Open link / Open list to call, to key in text or to select a highlighted item on the WAP page. Add bookmark to save the WAP page as a bookmark. View image or View images to view images and animations from the WAP page. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 107
Browsing the pages of a WAP service
Service inbox. See page 111. Use wallet info and Close wallet. See Guidelines for paying your purchases with wallet on page 99. Appear. settings. See Appearance settings of WAP browser on page 109. Cookie settings. See page 109. Use number to copy a number from the WAP page for saving or making a call. If the WAP page contains several numbers, you may select the desired one. Reload to reload and update the current WAP page. Clear the cache. See The cache memory on page 111. Security info to view security information about the current WAP connection and the server. Quit. See Ending a WAP connection on page 108.

Direct calling

The WAP browser supports functions which you can access while browsing. You can make a voice call, send DTMF tones while a voice call is in progress, and save in the phone book a name and a phone number from a WAP page.

Ending a WAP connection

To quit browsing and to end the connection, press Options and select Quit. When Quit browsing? is shown, press Yes. Alternatively, press. If GSM data is the selected data bearer, press connection to the WAP service. twice. The phone ends the
Go to address to key in the address of the WAP service you want to access.
1. While browsing, press Options and select Appear. settings, or in standby mode, press Menu, and select Services, Settings and Appearance settings. 2. Select Text wrapping or Show images. 3. Select On or Off for Text wrapping and Yes or No for Show images. When Text wrapping is set to On, the text continues on the next line if it cannot be shown on one line. If you select Off, the text is abbreviated if it is too long to be shown on one line. When Show images is set to No, any pictures appearing on the WAP page are not shown. This can speed up the browsing of WAP pages that contain a lot of pictures.

Cookie settings

You can set the phone to allow or prevent receiving cookies. A cookie is data that a WAP site saves in your phones browser cache memory. The data can be, for example, your user information or your browsing preferences. Cookies will be saved until you clear the cache memory, see The cache memory on page 111. 1. While browsing, press Options and select Cookie settings, or in standby mode, press Menu, and select Services and Settings. 2. Select Cookie settings and select Allow or Reject to allow or prevent the phone receiving cookies.

secure. It is up to the service provider to secure the data transmission between the gateway and the content server.
A server certificate is sent from the WAP server to the phone and its validity is checked using the authority certificates saved in the phone or the security module. The phone indicates if the identity of the WAP server or WAP gateway cannot be verified, if the WAP server or WAP gateway certificate is not authentic or if you do not have the correct authority certificate in your phone. The security indicator is displayed during a WAP connection, if the data transmission between the phone and the WAP gateway or WAP server (identified by the IP address in the Edit active service settings) is encrypted. It is up to the service provider to secure the data transmission between the gateway and the content server. Authority certificates Authority certificates are used by some WAP services, such as banking services, for checking signatures of server certificates or other authority certificates. User certificates User certificates are issued to users by a Certifying Authority. They associate a user with a specific private key in a security module and are used for digital signature.

Digital signature

You can make digital signatures with your phone. The signature can be traced back to you via the user certificate that was used to perform the signature. Making the digital signature can be the same as signing your name to a paper bill, contract or other document. For issuing a digital signature, select a link on a WAP page, for example, the title of the book you want to buy and its price. The text to sign, possibly including amount and date, for example, will be shown. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved. 114

Server certificates

Note: If the digital signature icon does not appear, there is a security breach, and you should not enter any personal data such as your signing PIN. To sign the text, read all of the text first and then you can select Sign. Note: The text may not fit within a single screen. Therefore, make sure to scroll through and read all of the text before signing. Select the user certificate you want to use. Key in the signing PIN (see Access codes on page 14) and press OK. The digital signature icon will disappear, and the WAP service may display a confirmation of your purchase.

Go to (Menu 14)

To access some specific functions quickly, press Menu and select Go to and select the desired function from the list. If you wish to add some functions to the list, press Add, scroll to the function that you want to add and press Mark. To remove or add more functions on the list, see Personal shortcuts on page 73.
Check that the header text is Read and the digital signature icon

is shown.

In addition to the functions available on the phone, your SIM card may provide additional services that you can access in menu 13. Menu 13 is shown only if it is supported by your SIM card. The name and contents of the menu depends on the available services.
Note: For availability, rates and information on using SIM services, contact your SIM card vendor, e.g. network operator, service provider or other vendor.
You can set the phone to show you the confirmation messages sent between your phone and the network when you are using the SIM services by selecting the option Yes within the menu Confirm SIM service actions, menu 4-3-6. Note that accessing these services may involve sending a text message (SMS) or making a phone call for which you may be charged.

SIM services (Menu 15)

PC Connectivity
You can send and receive e-mails, and access the Internet when your phone is connected to a compatible PC via an IR connection or a data cable. You can use your phone with a variety of PC connectivity and data communications applications. With the PC suite you can, for example, send text and picture messages, synchronise contacts, calendar and to-do notes between your phone and the PC and manage your WAP bookmarks and connection sets. You may find more information and downloadable files on the Nokia website, www.nokia.com/ support/phones/6100.

PC Suite

The PC Suite contains the following applications: Nokia Application Installer to install Java applications from the PC to the phone. Nokia Image Converter to make images usable for multimedia messages or wallpapers and to transfer them to your phone. Nokia Sound Converter to edit polyphonic ringing tones to be compatible with your phone and to transfer them to your phone. Nokia Content Copier to copy data or back-up data from your phone to PC or to another Nokia phone. Nokia PC WAP Manager to edit and send your WAP bookmarks or update the connection sets to your phone. Copyright 2003 Nokia. All rights reserved.

8. Battery statements

CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Your phone is a product of superior design and craftsmanship and should be treated with care. The suggestions below will help you to fulfil any warranty obligations and to enjoy this product for many years. Keep the phone and all its parts and accessories out of the reach of small children. Keep the phone dry. Precipitation, humidity and all types of liquids or moisture can contain minerals that will corrode electronic circuits. Do not use or store the phone in dusty, dirty areas. Its moving parts can be damaged. Do not store the phone in hot areas. High temperatures can shorten the life of electronic devices, damage batteries, and warp or melt certain plastics. Do not store the phone in cold areas. When it warms up (to its normal temperature), moisture can form inside, which may damage electronic circuit boards. Do not attempt to open the phone. Non-expert handling may damage it. Do not drop, knock or shake the phone. Rough handling can break internal circuit boards. Do not use harsh chemicals, cleaning solvents, or strong detergents to clean the phone. Do not paint the phone. Paint can clog the moving parts and prevent proper operation. Use only the supplied or an approved replacement antenna. Unauthorised antennas, modifications or attachments could damage the phone and may violate regulations governing radio devices. All of the above suggestions apply equally to your phone, battery, charger or any accessory. If any of them is not working properly, take it to your nearest qualified service facility. The personnel there will assist you and, if necessary, arrange for service.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Traffic Safety

Do not use a hand-held telephone while driving a vehicle. Always secure the phone in its holder; do not place the phone on the passenger seat or where it can break loose in a collision or sudden stop. Remember road safety always comes first!

Operating environment

Remember to follow any special regulations in force in any area and always switch off your phone whenever it is forbidden to use it, or when it may cause interference or danger. Use the phone only in its normal operating positions. Parts of the phone are magnetic. Metallic materials may be attracted to the phone, and persons with a hearing aid should not hold the phone to the ear with the hearing aid. Always secure the phone in its holder, because metallic materials may be attracted by the earpiece. Do not place credit cards or other magnetic storage media near the phone, because information stored on them may be erased.

Electronic devices

Most modern electronic equipment is shielded from radio frequency (RF) signals. However, certain electronic equipment may not be shielded against the RF signals from your wireless phone.

 

Technical specifications

Full description

Simple yet sophisticated, compact yet comfortable. Don't let its size deceive you - the Nokia 6100 phone offers advanced mobile technology, providing you with uncompromising performance for both private and professional life. The Nokia 6100 phone's small size, large color display, and comfortable keypad make it compact, yet convenient. Write messages and calendar notes, or access your phone's various features with the four-way scroll key. Add more media to your messages with your Nokia 6100 phone's MMS capability. You can send and receive text, sound, graphics, and pictures between compatible devices. Java lets you personalize your Nokia 6100 phone by downloading interactive games, life management tools, travel-related applications, and information tools. GPRS for fast WAP browsing and e-mail is also supported. You don't even have to log on to the network - GRPS is "always on", so you can instantly connect to services. Using the electronic wallet in your Nokia mobile phone, you can perform mobile transactions that are both safe and convenient.

General
Product TypeCellular phone
Phone DesignCandy bar
AntennaInternal
Width1.7 in
Depth0.5 in
Height4 in
Weight2.7 oz
Available Body ColorsDark blue, light blue, yellowish beige
Cellular
TechnologyGSM
BandEGSM 900 / GSM 1800/1900 (Tri-Band)
Service ProviderNot specified
Software Platforms SupportedJava
Installed GamesPuzzle Chess
Messaging & Internet
Cellular Messaging ServicesMMS, Nokia Smart Messaging, SMS
Supported SMS FunctionsSMS MT (Mobile Terminated), SMS Chat, concatenated SMS
Internet BrowserYes
WAP Protocol SupportedWAP 1.2.1
Downloadable ContentRing tones, screensavers, wallpapers
Communications
GPRS (General Packet Radio Service)Yes
High Speed Circuit Switched Data (HSCSD)Yes
Wireless InterfaceInfrared (IrDA)
Telephone Features
SpeakerphoneYes
Call TimerYes
Conference Call CapabilityYes
Ring Tones31
Polyphonic RingerYes
Vibrating AlertYes
Additional FeaturesIntelligent typing (T9), SIM application toolkit (STK), closed user groups, world clock, downloadable JAVA applications
Organizer
Missed Calls Memory10
Dialed Calls Memory20
Received Calls Memory10
Phone Book Entries Qty300
CalculatorYes , business/financial
ConversionMetric, currency
Alarm ClockYes
CalendarYes
ReminderYes
Event Qty250
Additional Timer FunctionsCountdown timer, stopwatch, snooze
Memory
User Memory725 KB
Security Features
Phone LockYes
Keypad LockYes
SIM Card LockYes
Restrict Access to Phone BookYes
Display
TypeLCD display - color
Line Qty8
Display Resolution128 x 128 pixels
Color Depth4,096 colors
Display IndicatorsSMS indicator, silent ring signal, divert indicator, GPRS indicator, signal strength, voice message waiting, keypad lock, battery meter
Display Illumination ColorWhite
Multi-language MenuYes
FeaturesWallpaper, screensaver, backlit
Connections
Connector TypeData port - IrDA Data port Headset jack
Battery
TechnologyLithium ion
Capacity720 mAh
Run Time DetailsTalk - up to 360 min Standby - up to 320 hrs
Miscellaneous
Included AccessoriesPower adapter
Manufacturer Warranty
Service & Support1 year warranty
Service & Support DetailsLimited warranty - parts and labor - 1 year
Universal Product Identifiers
BrandNokia
Part Numbers6100, 75139, 75140, Nokia 6100
GTIN06417182246500

 

Tags

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