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Nokia 6610

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About

Nokia 6610Nokia 6610i

Nokia - GSM - Unlocked

Triple band (GSM 900/1800/1900). Weight: 87g.JAVA Technology .

Details
Brand: Nokia
Part Numbers: NOKIA6610I, Nokia 6610i, nokia6610i
UPC: 610214610218


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User reviews and opinions

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Comments to date: 8. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
fidogesiwuj 1:36am on Friday, October 15th, 2010 
My Mobile dealer suggested me this phone along with many other Nokia models and I chose this one since it also fitted best to my pocket. I have been using the Nokia 6610 last year and now I am using Sony Ericsson T290i. but I choose Nokia 6610 with Sony Ericsson T290i.
VicelTGPSE 4:11pm on Tuesday, September 14th, 2010 
This 6610i is not good in case of camera ,but has still usable. Small in size,Good look and Feel ,FM radio Photos not clear ,No Composer .
mj2810 1:31pm on Sunday, June 6th, 2010 
This is my first cell phone and i really do love it. I like and appreciate all its features. It is easy to use and works well. Average but dont buy it if u have a choice. p.s try not to get it wet.
danbonnick 7:04am on Friday, June 4th, 2010 
this is an excellent phone from nokia with all the functions except bluetooth and mp3.camera quality is just ok . I used the Nokia 6610 for about 3 years before it finally gave out. Completely devastated.
rambazamba 8:43pm on Monday, May 10th, 2010 
The 6610i happens to be one of the best mobile phones in its range of entry-level camera mobile phones. Being a mobile phone.
x-mas 5:10am on Friday, April 30th, 2010 
this phone, is great! if you are looking for something relatively plain, simple, reliable with relatively up-to-date technology then it is for you! My son upgraded to this phone from his Nokia 3410,I was impressed with the features and quality so I bought one to replace my Nokia 7210. Ok.
wintermute115 3:03pm on Saturday, April 24th, 2010 
Handsfree speakers and make the Nokia 6610 MMS step further. Added more features polyphonic ring tone and a value-added GPRS phone.
int 6:00pm on Tuesday, April 13th, 2010 
its great with it color it has a code 4 a game its ring tones are very excellent When i had an "upgrade" from a Sagem MYX6 to the nokia 6610i i have to admitt i was VERY dissapionted. The canmera has NO zoom.

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

Hardware connection issues are also not the subject of this tutorial; you can download the Olimex schematic for the SAM7-EX256 board to see their design for a hardware interface to the Nokia 6100 LCD display.

LCD Display Orientation

The Nokia 6100 display has 132 x 132 pixels; each one with 12-bit color (4 bits RED, 4 bits GREEN and 4 bits BLUE). Practically speaking, you cannot see the first and last row and columns. The normal orientation is as follows:

Columns

(131,0)

(131,131)

(0,131)
Figure 2. Default Orientation of Nokia 6100 LCD Display
That, of course, is upside-down on the Olimex SAM7-EX256 board if the silk-screen lettering is used as the up/down reference. So I set the mirror x and mirror y command to rotate the display 180 degrees, as shown below. This will be the orientation used in this tutorial (it is so easy to change back, if you desire).
Figure 3. Tutorial Orientation of Nokia 6100 LCD Display
Communication with the Display
The Nokia 6100 uses a two-wire serial SPI interface (clock and data). The ARM7 microcontroller SPI peripheral generates the clock and data signals and the display acts solely as a slave device. Olimex elected to not implement the MISO0 signal that would allow the ARM microcontroller to read from the LCD display (you could read some identification codes, status, temperature data, etc). Therefore, the display is strictly write-only! We send 9 bits to the display serially, the ninth bit indicates if a command byte or a data byte is being transmitted. Note in the timing diagram below from the Philips manual, the ninth bit (command or data) is clocked out first and is LOW to indicate a command byte or HIGH to indicate a data byte.
Figure 4. SPI serial interface sends commands and data bytes How fast can this SPI interface be run? Since the PCF8833 data sheet specifies that the serial clock SCLK period be no less than 150 nsec, dividing the boards master clock (48054841 Hz) by 8 gives a period of 166 nsec. Thus we can safely run the SPI interface at 6 MHz. I have run the SPI interface at 16 MHz and it still worked, but that is tempting fate.
The SAM7-EX256 board uses an ARM7 microprocessor; so commands or data are submitted to the SPI peripheral as unsigned integers (32 bits) wherein only the lower 9 bits are used. For example, to send a command we clear bit 8 to specify this is a command transmission. The lowest 8 bits contain the desired PCF8833 command.

unsigned int command; // PCF8833 command byte // wait for the previous transfer to complete // clear bit 8 - indicates a "command" byte // send the command
while ((pSPI->SPI_SR & AT91C_SPI_TXEMPTY) == 0); command = (command & (~0x0100)); pSPI->SPI_TDR = command;
Likewise, to send a data byte we set bit 8 to specify that this is a data transmission. The lowest 8 bits contain the desired PCF8833 data byte.
unsigned int data; // PCF8833 data byte // wait for the previous transfer to complete // set bit 8 - indicates a "data" byte // send the command
while ((pSPI->SPI_SR & AT91C_SPI_TXEMPTY) == 0); data = (data | 0x0100); pSPI->SPI_TDR = data;
Both snippets have a wait until TXEMPTY to guarantee that a new command/data stream is not started before the previous one has completed. This is quite safe as you will never get stuck forever in that wait loop. The LCD driver has three functions supporting the SPI interface to the LCD: InitSpi( ) WriteSpiCommand(command) WriteSpiData(data) - sets up the SPI interface #1 to communicate with the LCD - sends a command byte to the LCD - sends a data byte to the LCD
Using these commands is quite simple; for example, to initialize the SPI interface and then set the contrast for the Philips controller: InitSpi( ); WriteSpiCommand(SETCON); WriteSpiData(0x30); // Initialize SPI interface to LCD // Write contrast (command 0x25) // contrast 0x30 (range is -63 to +63)
The hardware interface uses five I/O port pins; four bits from PIOA and one bit from PIOB, as shown in Table 1 and Figure 5 below.
PA2 PA12 PA16 PA17 PA18 PB20
LCD Reset (set to low to reset) LCD chip select (set to low to select the LCD chip) SPI0_MISO Master In - Slave Out (not used in LCD interface) SPI0_MOSI Master Out - Slave In pin (Serial Data to LCD slave) SPI0_SPCK Serial Clock (to LCD slave) backlight control (normally PWM control, 1 = full on)
Table 1. I/O port bits used to support the SPI interface to the LCD Display
Note in Table 1 above that Olimex elected not to support the SPIO_MOSI Master In bit (PA16) which would have allowed the user to read from the display. The LED backlight needs a lot of current, so a 7-volt boost converter is used for this purpose. The backlight can be turned on and off using PB20. It looks like you might be able to PWM the backlight, but I doubt anyone would want the backlight to be at half brightness.

PA18 PA17 PA12 PA2

Figure 5. Hardware Interface to Nokia 6100 LCD Display (Olimex design)

Addressing Pixel Memory

The Philips PCF8833 controller has a 17424 word memory (132 x 132), where each word is 12 bits (4-bit color each for red, green and blue). You address it by specifying the address of the desired pixel with the Page Address Set command (rows) and the Column Address Set command (columns). The Page Address Set and Column Address Set command specify two things, the starting pixel and the ending pixel. This has the effect of creating a drawing box. This sounds overly complex, but it has a wrap-around and auto-increment feature that greatly simplifies writing character fonts and filling rectangles. The pixel memory has 132 rows and 132 columns, as shown below in Figure 6 (131,0) (131,131)

Consider the following points. The resolution of the Nokia 6100 display is 132 x 132 pixels, 12 bits/pixel. Since the 8 bits/pixel encoding is converted by the color table to 12 bits/pixel, there is no saving of display memory. The 8 bits/pixel encoding would use about 1/3 less data bytes to fill an area, so there would be a performance gain in terms of the number of bytes transferred. The 8 bits/pixel encoding would make a photograph look terrible. In the authors view, theres very little to be gained by using this mode in an ARM microcontroller environment. Therefore, I elected to not implement the color table and 8-bit encoding in this driver.
16 bits per pixel Selection of 16 bits/pixel mode is accomplished by sending the Color Interface Pixel Format command (0x3A) followed by a single data byte containing the value 5. This encoding requires a Memory Write command and two subsequent data bytes to specify a single pixel. The color information is encoded as 5 bits for RED, 6 bits for GREEN and 5 bits for BLUE, as shown in Figure 10 below 0 R G 0 R G 1 R G 0 R B 1 R B 1 G B 0 G B 0 G B RAMWR command (memory write) Data: Red (5 bits), Green (6 bits) Data: Green (6 bits), Blue (5 bits)
Figure10. Color encoding for 16 bits per - pixel This pixel encoding is converted by the controller using a dithering technique to the 12-bit data for the pixel RAM. The net effect is to give 65k color variations. My view is that nobody is going to display the Mona Lisa on this tiny display, so 16-bit color encoding would be rarely used. I did not include support for it in the driver software, but you could easily add it if you desire. The Epson S1D15G00 controller supports the 8-bit and 12-bit modes, but not the 16-bit mode.
Wrap-Around and Auto Increment
The wrap-around feature is the cornerstone of the controllers design and it amazes me how many people ignored it in drawing rectangles and character fonts. This feature allows you to efficiently draw a character or fill a box with just a simple loop taking advantage of the wrap-around after writing the pixel in the last column and auto-incrementing to the next row. Remember how the pixel was addressed by defining a drawing box? If you are planning to draw an 8 x 8 character font, define the drawing box as 8 x 8 and do a simple loop on 64 successive pixels. The row and column addresses will automatically increment and wrap back when you come to the end of a row, as shown in Figure 11 below. The rules for Auto-incrementing and Wrap-Around are as follows. Set the column and row address to the bottom left of the drawing box. Set up a loop to do all the pixels in the box. Specifically, since three data bytes will specify the color for two pixels, the loop will typically iterate over the total number of pixels in the box. Writing three memory bytes will illuminate two pixels (12-bit resolution). Each pixel written automatically advances the column address. When the max column address pixel is done, the column address wraps back to the column starting address AND the row address increments by one. Now keep writing memory bytes until the next row is illuminated and so on.

Figure 11 shows the traversal of the drawing box. (131,0) (131,131)
Rows 8x8 box of Pixels at (4, 2) to (11,9) X

Y Columns

Figure 11. Drawing Box permits auto-increment and wrap-around. To illustrate this technique, Figure 12 shows the code to fill an 8 x 8 box shown above. Note that we set the row and column address just once (pointing to the lower left corner). Then we do a single Memory Write command followed by three data bytes done 33 times. The grand total is 106 SPI transmissions. Compare that to the implementation where you address each pixel, set Memory Write and feed two bytes of color data for each pixel. The grand total would be 576 SPI transmissions. The advantage gained using the auto-increment and wrap-around features is obvious. // Row address set (command 0x2B) WriteSpiCommand(PASET); WriteSpiData(4); WriteSpiData(11); // Column address set (command 0x2A) WriteSpiCommand(CASET); WriteSpiData(2); WriteSpiData(9); // Write Memory (command 0x2C) WriteSpiCommand(RAMWR);
Add one to account for possible round-off error in the divide by 2
// loop on total number of pixels / 2 for (i = 0; i < ((((11 - 4 + 1) * (9 - 2 + 1)) / 2) + 1); i++) { // use the color value to output three data bytes covering two pixels WriteSpiData((color >> 4) & 0xFF); WriteSpiData(((color & 0xF) << 4) | ((color >> 8) & 0xF)); WriteSpiData(color & 0xFF); } Figure 12. Code Snippet to Fill an 8 x 8 box Code to use this technique to draw a character font is similar, but at each pixel you have to determine if the font calls for a foreground color or the background color.
Initializing the LCD Display (Philips PCF8833)
This was a surprise to me but the Philips PCF8833 does not quite boot into a ready to display mode after hardware reset. The following is the minimal commands/data needed to place it into 12-bit color mode. First, we do a hardware reset with a simple manipulation of the port pin. Reset is asserted low on this controller. // Hardware reset LCD_RESET_LOW; Delay(20000); LCD_RESET_HIGH; Delay(20000); The controller boots into SLEEPIN mode, which keeps the booster circuits off. We need to exit sleep mode which will also turn on all the voltage booster circuits. // Sleep out (command 0x11) WriteSpiCommand(SLEEPOUT); This is still a mystery to me, but I had to invert the display and reverse the RGB setting to get the colors to work correctly in this particular display. If you have trouble, consider removing this command. // Inversion on (command 0x20) WriteSpiCommand(INVON);

// seems to be required for this controller
For this driver, I elected to use the 12-bit color pixel format exclusively. // Color Interface Pixel Format (command 0x3A) WriteSpiCommand(COLMOD); WriteSpiData(0x03); // 0x03 = 12 bits-per-pixel
In setting up the memory access controller, I elected to use the mirror x and mirror y commands to reorient the x and y axes to agree with the silk screen lettering on the Olimex board. If you want the default orientation, send the data byte 0x08 instead. Finally, I had to reverse the RGB color setting to get the color information to work properly. You may want to experiment with this setting. // Memory access controller (command 0x36). WriteSpiCommand(MADCTL); WriteSpiData(0xC8); // 0xC0 = mirror x and y, reverse rgb
I found that setting the contrast varies from display to display. You may want to try several different contrast data values and observe the results on your display. // Write contrast (command 0x25) WriteSpiCommand(SETCON); WriteSpiData(0x30); Delay(2000);

// contrast 0x30

Now that the display is initialized properly, we can turn on the display and were ready to start producing characters and graphics. // Display On (command 0x29) WriteSpiCommand(DISPON);
Initializing the LCD Display (Epson S1D15G00)
The Epson S1D15G00 controller also does not quite boot into a ready to display mode after hardware reset. The following is the minimal commands/data needed to place it into 12-bit color mode. First, we do a hardware reset with a simple manipulation of the port pin. Reset is asserted low on this controller. // Hardware reset LCD_RESET_LOW; Delay(20000); LCD_RESET_HIGH; Delay(20000);
Display timing is left at the default (P1 = 0), the duty setting is based on 132 lines (P2 = 0x20) and there will be no inversely highlighted lines (P3 = 0). // Display control WriteSpiCommand(DISCTL); WriteSpiData(0x00); // P1: 0x00 = 2 divisions, switching period=8 (default) WriteSpiData(0x20); // P2: 0x20 = nlines/4 - 1 = 132/4 - 1 = 32) WriteSpiData(0x00); // P3: 0x00 = no inversely highlighted lines
To be completely honest here, the common output scan direction chosen below (P1 = 1) is the only setting I found by experiment that resulted in a normal display; all other settings resulted in split-displays. // COM scan WriteSpiCommand(COMSCN); WriteSpiData(0x01); // P1: 0x01 = Scan 1->80, 160<-81
Since the Epson S1D15G00 boots up with the oscillators off and in sleep mode, we have to turn the oscillators on and get out of sleep mode. // Internal oscilator ON WriteSpiCommand(OSCON); // Sleep out WriteSpiCommand(SLPOUT);

LCD.H (for Philips PCF8833 Controller only)
The lcd.h include file contains the Philips commands and color specification codes.
#ifndef Lcd_h #define Lcd_h // ************************************************************************************* // LCD Include File for Philips PCF8833 STN RGB- 132x132x3 Driver // // Taken from Philips data sheet Feb 14, 2003 // ************************************************************************************* // Philips PCF8833 LCD controller command codes #define NOP 0x00 // nop #define SWRESET 0x01 // software reset #define BSTROFF 0x02 // booster voltage OFF #define BSTRON 0x03 // booster voltage ON #define RDDIDIF 0x04 // read display identification #define RDDST 0x09 // read display status #define SLEEPIN 0x10 // sleep in #define SLEEPOUT 0x11 // sleep out #define PTLON 0x12 // partial display mode #define NORON 0x13 // display normal mode #define INVOFF 0x20 // inversion OFF #define INVON 0x21 // inversion ON #define DALO 0x22 // all pixel OFF #define DAL 0x23 // all pixel ON #define SETCON 0x25 // write contrast #define DISPOFF 0x28 // display OFF #define DISPON 0x29 // display ON #define CASET 0x2A // column address set #define PASET 0x2B // page address set #define RAMWR 0x2C // memory write #define RGBSET 0x2D // colour set #define PTLAR 0x30 // partial area #define VSCRDEF 0x33 // vertical scrolling definition #define TEOFF 0x34 // test mode #define TEON 0x35 // test mode #define MADCTL 0x36 // memory access control #define SEP 0x37 // vertical scrolling start address #define IDMOFF 0x38 // idle mode OFF #define IDMON 0x39 // idle mode ON #define COLMOD 0x3A // interface pixel format #define SETVOP 0xB0 // set Vop #define BRS 0xB4 // bottom row swap #define TRS 0xB6 // top row swap #define DISCTR 0xB9 // display control #define DOR 0xBA // data order #define TCDFE 0xBD // enable/disable DF temperature compensation #define TCVOPE 0xBF // enable/disable Vop temp comp #define EC 0xC0 // internal or external oscillator #define SETMUL 0xC2 // set multiplication factor #define TCVOPAB 0xC3 // set TCVOP slopes A and B #define TCVOPCD 0xC4 // set TCVOP slopes c and d #define TCDF 0xC5 // set divider frequency #define DF8COLOR 0xC6 // set divider frequency 8-color mode #define SETBS 0xC7 // set bias system #define RDTEMP 0xC8 // temperature read back #define NLI 0xC9 // n-line inversion
#define RDID1 #define RDID2 #define RDID3 // backlight control #define BKLGHT_LCD_ON 1 #define BKLGHT_LCD_OFF 2 // Booleans #define NOFILL 0 #define FILL

// same as fraction -= 2*dx // same as fraction -= 2*dy
// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
2. Now set up the drawing box to be the desired rectangle WriteSpiCommand(PASET); WriteSpiData(xmin); WriteSpiData(xmax); WriteSpiCommand(CASET); WriteSpiData(ymin); WriteSpiData(ymax); // set the row boundaries // set the column boundaries
3. Calculate the number of pixels to be written divided by 2 NumPixels = ((((xmax - xmin + 1) * (ymax - ymin + 1)) / 2) + 1) You may notice that I added one pixel to the formula. This covers the case where the number of pixels is odd and we would lose one pixel due to rounding error. In the case of odd pixels, the number of pixels is exact. in the case of even pixels, we have one more pixel than needed, but it cannot be displayed because it is outside the drawing box. We divide by 2 because two pixels are represented by three bytes. So we work through the rectangle two pixels at a time. 4. Now a simple memory write loop will fill the rectangle for (i = 0; i < ((((xmax - xmin + 1) * (ymax - ymin + 1)) / 2) + 1); i++) { WriteSpiData((color >> 4) & 0xFF); WriteSpiData(((color & 0xF) << 4) | ((color >> 8) & 0xF)); WriteSpiData(color & 0xFF); } In the case of an unfilled rectangle, drawing four lines with the Bresenham line drawing algorithm is reasonably efficient. Author: James P Lynch July 7, 2007 *****************************************************************************************
void LCDSetRect(int x0, int y0, int x1, int y1, unsigned char fill, int color) { int xmin, xmax, ymin, ymax; int i; // check if the rectangle is to be filled if (fill == FILL) { // best way to create a filled rectangle is to define a drawing box // and loop two pixels at a time // calculate the min and max for x and y directions xmin = (x0 <= x1) ? x0 : x1; xmax = (x0 > x1) ? x0 : x1; ymin = (y0 <= y1) ? y0 : y1; ymax = (y0 > y1) ? y0 : y1; // specify the controller drawing box according to those limits // Row address set (command 0x2B) WriteSpiCommand(PASET); WriteSpiData(xmin); WriteSpiData(xmax); // Column address set (command 0x2A) WriteSpiCommand(CASET); WriteSpiData(ymin); WriteSpiData(ymax); // WRITE MEMORY WriteSpiCommand(RAMWR); // loop on total number of pixels / 2 for (i = 0; i < ((((xmax - xmin + 1) * (ymax - ymin + 1)) / 2) + 1); i++) { // use the color value to output three data bytes covering two pixels WriteSpiData((color >> 4) & 0xFF); WriteSpiData(((color & 0xF) << 4) | ((color >> 8) & 0xF)); WriteSpiData(color & 0xFF); }

} else { // best way to LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x1, } } draw un y0, x1, y1, x1, y0, x0, y0, x1, unfilled rectangle is to draw four lines y0, color); y1, color); y1, color); y1, color);
// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
************************************************************************************* LCDSetCircle.c Draws a line in the specified color at center (x0,y0) with radius Inputs: x0 y0 radius color = = = = row address (0. 131) column address (0. 131) radius in pixels 12-bit color value rrrrggggbbbb

Returns: Author:

nothing Jack Bresenham IBM, Winthrop University (Father of this algorithm, 1962) Note: taken verbatim Wikipedia article on Bresenham's line algorithm http://www.wikipedia.org
*************************************************************************************
void LCDSetCircle(int x0, int y0, int radius, int color) { int f = 1 - radius; int ddF_x = 0; int ddF_y = -2 * radius; int x = 0; int y = radius; LCDSetPixel(x0, y0 + radius, LCDSetPixel(x0, y0 - radius, LCDSetPixel(x0 + radius, y0, LCDSetPixel(x0 - radius, y0, While (x < y) { if (f >= 0) { y--; ddF_y += 2; f += ddF_y; } x++; ddF_x += 2; f += ddF_x + 1; LCDSetPixel(x0 + x, LCDSetPixel(x0 - x, LCDSetPixel(x0 + x, LCDSetPixel(x0 - x, LCDSetPixel(x0 + y, LCDSetPixel(x0 - y, LCDSetPixel(x0 + y, LCDSetPixel(x0 - y, } } color); color); color); color);

y0 y0 y0 y0 y0 y0 y0 y0

+ + + + -

y, y, y, y, x, x, x, x,

color); color); color); color); color); color); color); color);
// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
***************************************************************************** LCDPutChar.c Draws an ASCII character at the specified (x,y) address and color Inputs: c x y size fcolor bcolor nothing = = = = = = character to be displayed row address (0. 131) column address (0. 131) font pitch (SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE) 12-bit foreground color value 12-bit background color value
rrrrggggbbbb rrrrggggbbbb

Returns: Notes:

Here's an example to display "E" at address (20,20) LCDPutChar('E', 20, 20, MEDIUM, WHITE, BLACK); (27,20) | | ^ V : _ # : _ _ : _ _ x _ _ : _ _ : _ _ : _ # : _ _ (27,27) | | V # # # 0x7F _ _ # 0x31 # _ _ 0x34 # _ _ 0x3C # _ _ 0x34 _ _ # 0x31 # # # 0x7F _ _ _ 0x00

# # # # # # # _

// ************************************************************************************************* // LCDPutStr.c // // Draws a null-terminates character string at the specified (x,y) address, size and color // // Inputs: pString = pointer to character string to be displayed // x = row address (0. 131) // y = column address (0. 131) // Size = font pitch (SMALL, MEDIUM, LARGE) // fColor = 12-bit foreground color value rrrrggggbbbb // bColor = 12-bit background color value rrrrggggbbbb // // // Returns: nothing // // Notes: Here's an example to display "Hello World!" at address (20,20) // // LCDPutChar("Hello World!", 20, 20, LARGE, WHITE, BLACK); // // // Author: James P Lynch July 7, 2007 // ************************************************************************************************* void LCDPutStr(char *pString, int x, int y, int Size, int fColor, int bColor) { // loop until null-terminator is seen while (*pString != 0x00) { // draw the character LCDPutChar(*pString++, x, y, Size, fColor, bColor); // advance the y position if (Size == SMALL) y = y + 6; else if (Size == MEDIUM) y = y + 8; else y = y + 8; // bail out if y exceeds 131 if (y > 131) break; } } // ***************************************************************************** // Delay.c // // Simple for loop delay // // Inputs: a - loop count // // Author: James P Lynch June 27, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void Delay (unsigned long a) { while (--a!=0); }
// ********************************************************************************* // Font tables for Nokia 6610 LCD Display Driver (PCF8833 Controller) // // FONT6x8 - SMALL font (mostly 5x7) // FONT8x8 - MEDIUM font (8x8 characters, a bit thicker) // FONT8x16 - LARGE font (8x16 characters, thicker) // // Note: ASCII characters 0x00 through 0x1F are not included in these fonts. // First row of each font contains the number of columns, the // number of rows and the number of bytes per character. // // Author: Jim Parise, James P Lynch July 7, 2007 // ********************************************************************************* const unsigned char FONT6x8[97][8] = { 0x06,0x08,0x08,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x00, 0x50,0x50,0x50,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x50,0x50,0xF8,0x50,0xF8,0x50,0x50,0x00, 0x20,0x78,0xA0,0x70,0x28,0xF0,0x20,0x00, 0xC0,0xC8,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x98,0x18,0x00, 0x40,0xA0,0xA0,0x40,0xA8,0x90,0x68,0x00, 0x30,0x30,0x20,0x40,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x10,0x20,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x20,0x10,0x00, 0x40,0x20,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x00, 0x00,0x20,0xA8,0x70,0x70,0xA8,0x20,0x00, 0x00,0x20,0x20,0xF8,0x20,0x20,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x30,0x30,0x20,0x40, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0xF8,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x30,0x30,0x00, 0x00,0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x80,0x00,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0xA8,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x20,0x60,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x70,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x08,0x70,0x80,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0xF8,0x08,0x10,0x30,0x08,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x10,0x30,0x50,0x90,0xF8,0x10,0x10,0x00, 0xF8,0x80,0xF0,0x08,0x08,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x38,0x40,0x80,0xF0,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF8,0x08,0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x80,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x78,0x08,0x10,0xE0,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x20,0x40,0x00, 0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x20,0x10,0x08,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0xF8,0x00,0xF8,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x40,0x20,0x10,0x08,0x10,0x20,0x40,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x08,0x30,0x20,0x00,0x20,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0xA8,0xB8,0xB0,0x80,0x78,0x00, 0x20,0x50,0x88,0x88,0xF8,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x00, 0xF8,0x80,0x80,0xF0,0x80,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0xF8,0x80,0x80,0xF0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x00, 0x78,0x88,0x80,0x80,0x98,0x88,0x78,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0xF8,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x70,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x70,0x00, 0x38,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x10,0x90,0x60,0x00, 0x88,0x90,0xA0,0xC0,0xA0,0x90,0x88,0x00, 0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0x88,0xD8,0xA8,0xA8,0xA8,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0xC8,0xA8,0x98,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0x80,0x80,0x80,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x88,0x88,0xA8,0x90,0x68,0x00, 0xF0,0x88,0x88,0xF0,0xA0,0x90,0x88,0x00, 0x70,0x88,0x80,0x70,0x08,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0xF8,0xA8,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x70,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x88,0x50,0x20,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x88,0xA8,0xA8,0xA8,0x50,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x50,0x20,0x50,0x88,0x88,0x00, 0x88,0x88,0x50,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00, 0xF8,0x08,0x10,0x70,0x40,0x80,0xF8,0x00, 0x78,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x40,0x78,0x00, 0x00,0x80,0x40,0x20,0x10,0x08,0x00,0x00, 0x78,0x08,0x08,0x08,0x08,0x08,0x78,0x00, // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // columns, rows, num_bytes_per_char space 0x20 ! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + ,. / (forward slash) 0 0x: ; < = > ? @ 0x40 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P 0x50 Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ (back slash) ]

// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
: ; < = > ? @ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z [ \ ] ^ _ ` a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w

(back slash)

0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x63,0x36,0x1C,0x1C,0x1C,0x36,0x63,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x63,0x63,0x63,0x63,0x63,0x3F,0x03,0x06,0x3C,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x7F,0x66,0x0C,0x18,0x30,0x63,0x7F,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,

// // //

0x00,0x00,0x0E,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x70,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x0E,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x00,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x70,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x0E,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x18,0x70,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x00,0x3B,0x6E,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00, 0x00,0x70,0xD8,0xD8,0x70,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00};

// // // // //

{ | } ~ DEL
LCD.H (for Epson S1D15G00 Controller only)
This lcd.h include file contains the Epson commands and color specification codes.
#ifndef Lcd_h #define Lcd_h // ***************************************************************************** // lcd.h // // include file for Epson S1D15G00 LCD Controller // // // Author: James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define #define DISON DISOFF DISNOR DISINV COMSCN DISCTL SLPIN SLPOUT PASET CASET DATCTL RGBSET8 RAMWR RAMRD PTLIN PTLOUT RMWIN RMWOUT ASCSET SCSTART OSCON OSCOFF PWRCTR VOLCTR VOLUP VOLDOWN TMPGRD EPCTIN EPCOUT EPMWR EPMRD EPSRRD1 EPSRRD2 NOP 0xAF 0xAE 0xA6 0xA7 0xBB 0xCA 0x95 0x94 0x75 0x15 0xBC 0xCE 0x5C 0x5D 0xA8 0xA9 0xE0 0xEE 0xAA 0xAB 0xD1 0xD2 0x20 0x81 0xD6 0xD7 0x82 0xCD 0xCC 0xFC 0xFD 0x7C 0x7D 0x25 // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // Display on Display off Normal display Inverse display Common scan direction Display control Sleep in Sleep out Page address set Column address set Data scan direction, etc. 256-color position set Writing to memory Reading from memory Partial display in Partial display out Read and modify write End Area scroll set Scroll start set Internal oscillation on Internal oscillation off Power control Electronic volume control Increment electronic control by 1 Decrement electronic control by 1 Temperature gradient set Control EEPROM Cancel EEPROM control Write into EEPROM Read from EEPROM Read register 1 Read register 2 NOP instruction

// ***************************************************************************** // WriteSpiCommand.c // // Writes 9-bit command to LCD display via SPI interface // // Inputs: data - Epson S1D15G00 controller/driver command // // // Note: clears bit 8 to indicate command transfer // // Author: Olimex, James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void WriteSpiCommand(volatile unsigned int command) { // wait for the previous transfer to complete while((pSPI->SPI_SR & AT91C_SPI_TXEMPTY) == 0); // clear bit 8 - indicates a "command" command = (command & ~0x0100); // send the command pSPI->SPI_TDR = command;
} // // // // // // // // // // // //
***************************************************************************** WriteSpiData.c Writes 9-bit command to LCD display via SPI interface Inputs: Note: data Epson S1D15G00 controller/driver command
Author: Olimex, James P Lynch August 30, 2007 *****************************************************************************
void WriteSpiData(volatile unsigned int data) { // wait for the transfer to complete while((pSPI->SPI_SR & AT91C_SPI_TXEMPTY) == 0); // set bit 8, indicates "data" data = (data | 0x0100); // send the data pSPI->SPI_TDR = data;
// ***************************************************************************** // Backlight.c // // Turns the backlight on and off // // Inputs: state - 1 = backlight on // 2 = backlight off // // // Author: Olimex, James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void Backlight(unsigned char state) { if(state == 1) pPIOB->PIO_SODR else pPIOB->PIO_CODR = BIT20; = BIT20; // Set PB20 to HIGH // Set PB20 to LOW
// ***************************************************************************** // InitLcd.c // // Initializes the Epson S1D15G00 LCD Controller // // Inputs: none // // Author: James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void InitLcd(void) { // Hardware reset LCD_RESET_LOW; Delay(10000); LCD_RESET_HIGH; Delay(10000); // Display control WriteSpiCommand(DISCTL); WriteSpiData(0x00); // P1: 0x00 = 2 divisions, switching period=8 (default) WriteSpiData(0x20); // P2: 0x20 = nlines/4 - 1 = 132/4 - 1 = 32) WriteSpiData(0x00); // P3: 0x00 = no inversely highlighted lines // COM scan WriteSpiCommand(COMSCN); WriteSpiData(1); // P1: 0x01 = Scan 1->80, 160<-81 // Internal oscilator ON WriteSpiCommand(OSCON); // Sleep out WriteSpiCommand(SLPOUT); // Power control WriteSpiCommand(PWRCTR); WriteSpiData(0x0f); // reference voltage regulator on, circuit voltage follower on, BOOST ON // Inverse display WriteSpiCommand(DISINV); // Data control WriteSpiCommand(DATCTL); WriteSpiData(0x01); // P1: 0x01 = page address inverted, column address normal, address scan in column direction WriteSpiData(0x00); // P2: 0x00 = RGB sequence (default value) WriteSpiData(0x02); // P3: 0x02 = Grayscale -> 16 (selects 12-bit color, type A) // Voltage control (contrast setting) WriteSpiCommand(VOLCTR); WriteSpiData(32); // P1 = 32 volume value (experiment with this value to get the best contrast) WriteSpiData(3); // P2 = 3 resistance ratio (only value that works) // allow power supply to stabilize Delay(100000); // turn on the display WriteSpiCommand(DISON);

} } else {

// best way to LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x0, LCDSetLine(x1,
draw un y0, x1, y1, x1, y0, x0, y0, x1,
unfilled rectangle is to draw four lines y0, color); y1, color); y1, color); y1, color);

Returns:

nothing
Author: Jack Bresenham IBM, Winthrop University (Father of this algorithm, 1962) Note: taken verbatim Wikipedia article on Bresenham's line algorithm http://www.wikipedia.org *************************************************************************************
void LCDSetCircle(int x0, int y0, int radius, int color) { int f = 1 - radius; int ddF_x = 0; int ddF_y = -2 * radius; int x = 0; int y = radius; LCDSetPixel(x0, y0 + radius, LCDSetPixel(x0, y0 - radius, LCDSetPixel(x0 + radius, y0, LCDSetPixel(x0 - radius, y0, color); color); color); color);
} // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //
while(x < y) { if(f >= 0) { y--; ddF_y += 2; f += ddF_y; } x++; ddF_x += 2; f += ddF_x + 1; LCDSetPixel(x0 + x, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 - x, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 + x, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 - x, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 + y, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 - y, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 + y, y0 LCDSetPixel(x0 - y, y0 }
Here's an example to display "E" at address (20,20) LCDPutChar('E', 20, 20, MEDIUM, WHITE, BLACK); (27,20) | | ^ V : _ # # : _ _ # : _ _ # x _ _ # : _ _ # : _ _ # : _ # # : _ _ _ ^ | | (20,20) (27,27) | | V # # # 0x7F _ _ # 0x31 # _ _ 0x34 # _ _ 0x3C # _ _ 0x34 _ _ # 0x31 # # # 0x7F _ _ _ 0x00 ^ | | (20,27)

------y----------->

// // The most efficient way to display a character is to make use of the "wrap-around" feature // of the Epson S1D16G00 LCD controller chip. // // Assume that we position the character at (20, 20) that's a (row, col) specification. // With the row and column address set commands, you can specify an 8x8 box for the SMALL and MEDIUM // characters or a 16x8 box for the LARGE characters. // // WriteSpiCommand(PASET); // set the row drawing limits // WriteSpiData(20); // // WriteSpiData(27); // limit rows to (20, 27) // // WriteSpiCommand(CASET); // set the column drawing limits // WriteSpiData(20); // // WriteSpiData(27); // limit columns to (20,27) // // When the algorithm completes col 27, the column address wraps back to 20 // At the same time, the row address increases by one (this is done by the controller) // // We walk through each row, two pixels at a time. The purpose is to create three // data bytes representing these two pixels in the following format // // Data for pixel 0: RRRRGGGGBBBB // Data for Pixel 1: RRRRGGGGBBBB // // WriteSpiCommand(RAMWR); // start a memory write (96 data bytes to follow) // // WriteSpiData(RRRRGGGG); // first pixel, red and green data // WriteSpiData(BBBBRRRR); // first pixel, blue data; second pixel, red data // WriteSpiData(GGGGBBBB); // second pixel, green and blue data // : // and so on until all pixels displayed! // : // WriteSpiCommand(NOP); // this will terminate the RAMWR command // // // Author: James P Lynch August 30, 2007 // ***************************************************************************** void LCDPutChar(char c, int x, int y, int size, int fColor, int bColor) { extern const unsigned char FONT6x8[97][8]; extern const unsigned char FONT8x8[97][8]; extern const unsigned char FONT8x16[97][16]; int unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned unsigned int int int char char int int char char char i,j; nCols; nRows; nBytes; PixelRow; Mask; Word0; Word1; *pFont; *pChar; *FontTable[] = {(unsigned char *)FONT6x8, (unsigned char *)FONT8x8, (unsigned char *)FONT8x16};

doc1

MF1387-04

S1D15G00 Series

Rev. 1.0

Seiko Epson is neither licensed nor authorized to license its customers under one or more patents held by Motif Corporation to use this integrated circuit in the manufacture of liquid crystal display modules. Such license, however, may be obtained directly from MOTIF by writing to: Motif, Inc., c/o In Focus Systems, Inc., 27700A SW Parkway Avenue, Wilsonville, OR 97070-9215, Attention: Vice President Corporate Development. Seiko Epson Corporation 2001, All rights reserved.

Contents

1. DESCRIPTION..... 1 2. FEATURES..... 1 3. BLOCK DIAGRAM..... 2 4. PIN LAYOUT...... 3 5. LIST OF DEVICE MODELS.... 3 6. PIN COORDINATE..... 4 7. PIN DESCRIPTION.... 6 8. FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION.... 11 9. COMMANDS..... 30 10. ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATING.... 42 11. ELECTRIC CHARACTERISTICS.... 43 12. MPU INTERFACES (EXAMPLES FOR YOUR REFERENCE)... 53 13. PERIPHERAL CONNECTION EXAMPLES.... 58 14. EEPROM INTERFACE.... 60 15. CAUTIONS..... 61

1. DESCRIPTION

S1D15G00 series are the LCD drivers equipped with the liquid crystal drive power circuit to realize color display with one chip. S1D15G00 can be directly connected to the MPU bus to store parallel or serial gray-scale display data from MPU on the built-in RAM and to generate liquid crystal drive signals independent from MPU. S1D15G00 generates 396 segment outputs and 160*1 common outputs for driving liquid crystal. It incorporates the display RAM with capacity of 4 (16 grayscale). A single dot of pixel on the liquid crystal panel corresponds to 4 bits of the built-in RAM, enabling to display 132 (RGB) 160 pixels with one chip. Read or write operations from MPU to the display RAM can be performed without resorting to external actuating clock signals. S1D15G00 allows you to run the display system of high performance and handy equipment at the minimum power consumption thanks to its low-power liquid crystal drive power circuit and oscillation circuit. *1 : The S1D15G00D10*100 generates 300 segment outputs and 120 common outputs. It incorporates the display RAM with 4 capacity and displays 100 (RGB) 120 pixels.

2. FEATURES

Number of liquid crystal-drive outputs: 396 segment outputs and 160 common outputs. Low cross talk by frame rate modulation. 256 color from 4096-color display or full 4096-color display. When 256 color from 4096-color display is selected: 8 gray-scale for red and green and 4 gray-scale for blue (intermediate tone is selected with the command). When 4096-color display is selected: 16 gray-scale for red, green and blue. Direct data display with display RAM (When the LCD is set to normally black) RAM bit Data 0000. OFF (Black) 1111.ON (Maximum RGB display) (Normally black LCD, using "inverse display" command) Partial display function: You can save power by limiting the display space. This function is most suited for handy equipment in the standby mode. Display RAM : 4 = 266,112 bits.*1 *1: The S1D15G00D10*000 has RAM of 4 = 144,000 bits. MPU interface: S1D15G00 can be directly connected to both of the 8/16-bit parallel 80 and 68 series MPU. Two type serial interface are also available. 3 pins serial : CS, SCL and SI (D/C + 8-bit data) 4 pins serial : CS, SCL, SI and A0 Abundant command functions: Area scroll function, automatic page & column increment function, display direction switching function and power circuit control function. Built-in liquid crystal drive power circuit: S1D15G00 is equipped the charge pump booster circuit, voltage follower circuit and electric volume control circuit. Oscillation circuit with built-in high precision CR (external clock signals acceptable) EEPROM interface functions Low current consumption 500A (Conditions: S1D15G00D01B100, VDD = VDDI = 3.0V, frame frequency 130Hz, V2 = 6.0V, all display RAM data is 0) Supply voltage Power for input/output system power: VDDIGND=1.7V to 3.6V Power for internal circuit operation: VDDGND=2.6V to 3.6V Reference power for booster circuit: VDD2GND=2.6V to 3.6V Power for liquid crystal drive: V3MV3 =12.0V to 21.0V Wider operational range: 40C to 85C. Shipping from: Chip with gold bump. COF. Note that the radiation resistant design or light resistance design in strict sense is not employed for S1D15G00.

4096 color display 1 8-bit mode D7, D6, D5, D4, D3, D2, D1, D0: RRRRGGGG (8 bits) 1st write D7, D6, D5, D4, D3, D2, D1, D0: BBBBRRRR (8 bits) 2nd write D7, D6, D5, D4, D3, D2, D1, D0: GGGGBBBB (8 bits) 3rd write Data is acquired through write operations as shown above and then that of two pixels is written to the display RAM. 2 16-bit mode D15, D14, D13, D12, D11, D10, D9, D8, D7, D6, D5, D4, D3, D2, D1, D0: RRRRGGGGBBBBXXXX (12 bits) Data is acquired through single write operation and then written to the display RAM. XXXX are dummy bits, and they are ignored for display. 8.1.3 8- and 9-bit Serial Interface The 8-bit serial interface uses four pins - CS, SI, SCL and A0 - to enter commands and data. Meanwhile, the 9-bit serial interface uses three pins - CS, SI and SCL - for the same purpose. Data read is not available with the serial interface. Data entered must be 8 bits. Refer to the following chart for entering commands, parameters or gray-scale data. The relation between gray-scale data and data bus in the serial input is the same as that in the 8-bit parallel interface mode (described in the preceding section) at every gradation. (1) 8-bit serial interface When entering data (parameters): A0 = HIGH at the rising edge of the 8th SCL.
CS dot0(R) R2 SI SCL 1 AD7 R1 D6 R0 D5 G2 D4 dot1(G) G1 D3 G0 D2 dot2(B) B1 D1 B0 D0 R2 D7 dot3(R) R1 D6 R0 D5 G2 D4 dot4(R) G1 D3 G0 D2
When entering command: A0 = LOW at the rising edge of the 8th SCL.
CS command SI SCL 1 AD7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 D7 D6 command D5 D4 D3 D2
(2) 9-bit serial interface When entering data (parameters): SI = HIGH at the rising edge of the 1st SCL.
CS dot0(R) R2 SI SCL D/C D7 R1 D6 R0 D5 G2 D4 dot1(G) G1 D3 G0 D2 dot2(B) B1 D1 B0 D0 D/C R2 D7 dot3(R) R1 D6 R0 D5 D4
When entering commands: SI = LOW at the rising edge of the 1st SCL.
CS command SI SCL D/C D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 D/C command D7 D6 D5 D4
* If CS is caused to HIGH before 8 bits from D7 to D0 are entered, the data concerned is invalidated. Before entering succeeding sets of data, you must correctly input the data concerned again. * In order to avoid data transfer error due to incoming noise, it is recommended to set CS at HIGH on byte basis to initialize the serial-to-parallel conversion counter and the register.

Note: VREG is the constant voltage source inside the IC. It is 1.2V (Typ.) at Ta = 25C.
VEV (Constant voltage source + Electronic volume controller) Built-in Rb

Built-in Ra GND

Fig. 8.11.3 Voltage Regulator Circuit Rb/Ra in Equation A-1 is the resistance ratio of the built-in V2 voltage-regulating resistance. This ratio can be varied in 8 levels by changing parameters 2(P2) of electronic volum control command. Reference ratios of 1 + Rb/Ra are shown in Table 8.11.4. Table 8.11.4 Resistance Ratio of Built-in V2 Voltage-Regulating Resistance: Parameters and 1+ R/Ra Ratio (For reference) Parameter P22 P21 P1 1+Rb/Ra ratio 3.95 4.27 4.60 4.93 5.26 5.59 5.92 6.25 V1 voltage value Small Large
2V2 voltage control external resistor The contents described in this document apply only to models that use an external V2 voltage control resistor. If you use an external resistance control model, you can set the V2 voltage using an external resistor. Use a semi-fixed resistor for V2 voltage regulation.
VCSL VEV (Fixed voltage source and Electronic volume control) + VR External resistor Rb External resistor Ra GND GND V2 V2
Fig. 8.11.4 Voltage Regulator Circuit Select the external Ra and Rb values to allow stable voltage supply by observing the V2 voltage waveforms. As the VR pin has a high input impedance and it is susceptible to ambient noise, the resistors and their leads must be placed in a short distance and they must be away from the clock source. 3Constant Voltage Source and Electronic Volume Control Circuit The constant voltage source generates VREG - the reference voltage inside the IC. You can specify one of four types of temperature gradients with parameters of electronic volum control command. See Fig. 8.11.5.
Table 8.11.5 Parameters and VREG Temperature Gradient Parameter Temperature gradient (%/C) 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 The electronic volume control circuit varies in Equation A-1 according to parameters 1(P1) of electronic volum control command. Table 8.11.6 lists relation between the parameters and. Table 8.11.6 Parameters and Electronic Volume Parameter P15 P14 P13 P12 P11 P 0 8.11.5 Voltage Divider/Voltage Follower Circuit The voltage divider/voltage follower circuit V2 output from the voltage regulator circuit and then generates liquid crystal drive voltages V1, VC and MV1 using the operational amplifier-featured voltage follower. Capacitors may be required for voltage regulation between the GND and each of V1 , VC and MV1 pins due to the load of LCD panel. Insert the capacitors, if necessary, by observing the voltage waveforms and current consumption. V1 = 3/4V2 VC = 2/4V2 MV1 = 1/4V2 8.11.6 Secondary Booster Circuit and Tertiary Booster/Step-Down Circuit The secondary booster circuit boosts or steps down based on V2 and produces V 3 and MV3. Their potential relationship is expressed with the following theoretical equation: V3 = 2V2 MV3 = V2 8.11.7 Samples of Connections Peripheral to Power Circuit (For your information) Following illustrates the connections when the entire power circuit is used.

In the default, 11H inverse highlight is selected. (7) Seep in (SLPIN) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 Entering this command generates LOW at SLP pin. ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 1
DOFF (LCD panel blanking control pin) on S1D15G00 is caused to LOW when the sleep in mode is turned on. The LCD power supply and the boost circuit output is jumpered with GND during Sleep In.
(8) Sleep out (SLPOUT) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 Entering this command generates HIGH at SLP pin. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
(9) Page address set (PASET) Command: 1 Parameter: 2 When MPU makes access to the display data RAM, this command and succeeding parameters are used to specify the page address area. As the addresses are incremented from the start to the end page in the page-direction scan, the column address is incremented by 1 and the page address is returned to the start page. Note that the start and end page must be specified as a pair. Also, the relation start page < end page must be maintained. A0 Command 0 Parameter1 (P1) 1 Parameter2 (P2) 1 RD WR D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 P17 P16 P15 P14 P13 P12 P11 P0 P27 P26 P25 P24 P23 P22 P21 P20 Function Start page End page
(10) Column address set (CASET) Command: 1 Parameter: 2 When MPU makes access to the display data RAM, this command and succeeding parameters are used to specify the column address area. As the addresses are incremented from the start to the end column in the column-direction scan, the page address is incremented by 1 and the column address is returned to the start column. Note that the start and end page must be specified as a pair. Also, the relation start column < end column must be maintained. A0 Command 0 Parameter1 (P1) 1 Parameter2 (P2) 1 RD WR D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 P17 P16 P15 P14 P13 P12 P11 P0 P27 P26 P25 P24 P23 P22 P21 P20 Function Start address End address
* Note that in the 8- and16-bit access, or 8 and 16 gray-scale, a different approach is employed for specifying the address.
(11) Data control (DATCTL) Command: 1 Parameters: 2 This command and succeeding parameters are used to perform various setups needed when MPU operates display data stored on the built-in RAM. A0 Command 0 Parameter1 (P1) 1 RD WR D* D* D* D* D3 D2 D1 D0 Function * P12 P11 P10 Normal/inverse display of page address and page-address scan direction. * P22 P21 P20 RGB arrangement * P32 P31 P30 Gray-scale setup

Page address set No Column address set Is modification complete? Yes Read modify write in Read modify write out

Dummy read

Data read

Data write

(18) Read modify write out (RMWOUT) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 Entering this command cancels the read modify write mode. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
(19) Area scroll set (ASCSET) Command: 1 Parameter: 4 It is used when scrolling only the specified portion of the screen (dividing the screen by lines). This command and succeeding parameters specify the type of area scroll, FIX area and scroll area. Command Parameter1 (P1) Parameter2 (P2) Parameter3 (P3) Parameter4 (P4) ARD WR D* * * * D6 D5 D4 D1 * P15 P14 P13 * P25 P24 P23 * P35 P34 P33 * * * * DP12 P22 P32 * DP11 P21 P31 P41 DP10 P20 P30 P40 Function Top block address Bottom block address Number of specified blocks Area scroll mode
*: Invalid bits irrelevant with the operation. P4: It is used to specify an area scroll mode. P1 P1 Types of area scroll Center screen scroll Top screen scroll Bottom screen scroll Whole screen scroll
Top screen scroll Bottom screen scroll Whole screen scroll
Since S1D15G00 processes the liquid crystal display signals on the four-line basis (block basis), FIX and scroll areas are also specified on the four-line basis (block basis). DDRAM address corresponding to the top FIX area is set in the block address incrementing direction starting with 0 block. DDRAM address corresponding to the bottom FIX area is set in the block address decreasing direction starting with 41st block. Other DDRAM blocks excluding the top and bottom FIX areas are assigned to the scroll + background areas. P1: It is used to specify the top block address of the scroll + background areas. Specify the 0th block for the top screen scroll or whole screen scroll. The scroll start block address is also set at this top block address until the scroll-start block set command specifies the address. P2: It specifies the bottom address of the scroll + background areas. Specify the 41st block for the bottom or whole screen scroll. Required relation between the start and end blocks (start block < end block) must be maintained. P3: It specifies a specific number of blocks {Numbers of (Top FIX area + Scroll area) blocks - 1}. When the bottom scroll or whole screen scroll, the value is identical with P2. You can turn on the area scroll function by executing the area scroll set command first and then specifying the display start block of the scroll area with the scroll start set command. Rev. 1.0
[Area Scroll Setup Example] In the center screen scroll of 1/128 duty (display range: 128 lines = 32 blocks), if 8 lines = 2 blocks and 8 lines = 2 blocks are specified for the top and bottom FIX areas, 112 lines = 28 blocks is specified for the scroll areas, respectively, 40 lines = 10 blocks on the DDRAM are usable as the background area. Value of each parameter at this time is as shown below. A0 RD WR D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 P* * Top block address = 2 P* * Bottom block address = 39 P* * Number of specific blocks = 29 P* * * * * * Area scroll mode = Center *: Invalid bits irrelevant to the operations. (20) Scroll start address set (SCSTART) Command: 1 Parameter: 1 This command and succeeding parameter are used to specify the start block address of the scroll area. Note that you must execute this command after executing the area scroll set command. Scroll becomes available by dynamically changing the start block address. Command Parameter1 (P1) A1 RD WR D* D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D* P15 P14 P13 P12 P11 P10 Function Start block address

*: Invalid bits irrelevant to the operations. (21) Internal oscillation on (OSCON) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 This command turns on the internal oscillation circuit. It is valid only when the internal oscillation circuit of CLS = HIGH is used. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 1
(22) Internal oscillation off (OSOFF) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 It turns off the internal oscillation circuit. This circuit is turned off in the reset mode. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
(23) Power control set (PWRCTR) Command: 1 Parameter: 1 This command is used to turn on or off the liquid crystal driving power circuit, booster/step-down circuits and voltage follower circuit. A0 Command 0 Parameter1 (P1) 1 RD WR D* D* D* D4 D3 D2 D1 D* P13 P12 P11 P10 Function LCD drive power
*: Invalid bits irrelevant to the operations. P10: It turns on or off the Reference voltage generation circuit. P10 = 1: ON. P10 = 0: OFF. P11: It turns on or off the voltage regulator and circuit voltage follower. P11 = 1: ON. P11 = 0: OFF. Note: 2 bits of P10 and P11 must be turned on or off simultaneously. P12: It turns on or off the secondary booster/step-down circuit. P12 = 1: ON. P12 = 0: OFF. P13: It turns on the primary booster circuit.
(24) Electronic volume control (VOLCTR) Command: 1 Parameter: 2 This command is used to specify the voltage regulator circuits electronic volume value and resistance ratio of builtin voltage regulating resistor. A0 Command 0 Parameter1 (P1) 1 Parameter2 (P2) 1 RD WR D* * D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D* P15 P14 P13 P12 P11 P10 * * * * P22 P21 P20 Function V1 volume value 1 + Rb/Ra
*: Invalid bits irrelevant to the operations. P1: It is used to specify V2 electronic volume value. P2: It specifies resistance ratio of the internal resistor. (25) Increment Electronic Control (VOLUP) Command: 1 Parameter: No This command increments Electronic Control value of voltage regulator circuit by 1. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
If you set the Electronic Control value to 111111, the control value is set to 000000 after this command has been executed. (26) Decrement Electronic Control (VOLDOWN) Command: 1 Parameter: No This command decrements Electronic Control value of voltage regulator circuit by 1. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 1

If you set the Electronic Control value to 000000, the control value is set to 111111 after this command has been executed. (27) Temperature gradient set (TMPGRD) Command: 1 Parameter: 5 This command is used to specify the average temperature gradient of liquid crystal drive voltage as well as the correction value of the electronic volume value at the predetermined 10 temperature levels. Command Parameter1 (P1) P1 A1 RD WR P1 D* D* D* D* D* D2 D1 D0 Function 0 * P11 P10 Average temperature gradien
Average temperature gradient [%/C] 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2
(28) Control EEPROM (EPCTIN) Command: 1 Parameter: 1 This command with its parameter selects the EEPROM (S1F65170) Control mode. The parameter can be set to either Write or Read. Command Parameter1 (P1) A1 RD WR D* D* DP5 D* D* D* D* D* Function Selects Write or Read.
* Invalid bit; it is ignored during operation. P5: Specifies data writing into or reading from the EEPROM (S1F65170) as follows. If P5=0: Read; if P5=1: Write
(29) Cancel EEPROM Control (EPCOUT) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 This command cancels the EEPROM (S1F65170) Control mode. If data is read from the EEPROM, both of Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio are updated by the read data. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
(30) Write Into EEPROM (EPMWR) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 This command writes the Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio into the EEPROM (S1F65170). Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
(31) Read From EEPROM (EPMRD) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 This command reads the Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio from the EEPROM (S1F65170), and temporarily stores them in S1D15G00 registers. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 1
(32) Read Register 1 (EPSRRD1) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 Issue the EPSRRD1 and STREAD (Status Read) commands in succession to read the Electronic Control value. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 0
Issue the Status Read command immediately after this command. Also, always issue the NOP command after the STREAD (Status Read) command. (33) Read Register 1 (EPSRRD2) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 Issue the EPSRRD1 and STREAD (Status Read) commands in succession to read the built-in resistance ratio. ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 1
Issue the Status Read command immediately after this command. Also, always issue the NOP command after the STREAD (Status Read) command. (34) Non-operating (NOP) Command: 1 Parameter: 0 This command does not affect the operation. Command ARD WR DDDDDDDD0 1
This command, however, has the function of canceling the IC test mode. Thus, it is recommended to enter it periodically to prevent malfunctioning due to noise and such.
(35) Status read (STREAD) It is the command for the IC chip test. Dont try to use this command. Command ARD WR D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 Status data D2 D1 D0
1 Status after reset or after NOP operation D7: Area scroll mode Refer to P37 (ASCSET). D6: Area scroll mode Refer to P37 (ASCSET). D5: Read modify write 0: In 1: Out D4: Scan direction 0: Page 1: Column D3: Display ON/OFF 0: OFF 1: ON D2: EEPROM access 0: Out of access 1: In access D1: Display normal/inverse 0: Inverse 1: Normal D0: Partial display 0: OFF 1: ON 2 Status after EPSRRD1 operation D7, D6: Undefined (1 or 0) D5 to D0: Electronic volume control values 3 Status after EPSRRD2 operation D7 to D3: Undefined (1 or 0) D2 to D0: Built-in resistance ratio

VDDI Input terminal capacity Output terminal capacity Oscillated frequency Internal oscillation CI CO fOSC
Table 11.2 Item Input voltage to primary booster circuit Output voltage from primary booster circuit Primary booster circuit output impedance Reference voltage Voltage adjusting circuit output voltage Secondary boosting output voltage Secondary step-down output voltage Symbol VDD2 VOUT Rout VREG V2 V3 MV3 Triple boosting, no load Triple boosting, VDD=2.7V, C=2.2F Ta=25C no load Condition Standard value Min. Typ. Max. 2.6 7.8 1.16 4.0 8.0 7.0 2600 1.20 3.6 10.8 1.24 7.0 14.0 4.0 Unit Applicable pin V V V V V V VDD VOUT VOUT *7 V2 V3 MV3
Static current consumption: While the display is in operation and the built-in power supply is turned on. Current consumed by total IC including the built-in power supply.
Built-in power supply circuit
1200 Horizontal stripe per 4 dots 1000 800

IDD [A]

Display RAM all "0" 6 V2 voltage [V] 7 8
Condition: VDD = 2.75V, VDDI = 1.8V, frame frequency 130Hz During display, built-in power supply and built-in oscillation circuit on, built-in power supply triple boosting voltage Typical value when Ta = 25C Fig. 11.1 Dynamic current consumption (During display, liquid crystal drive voltage dependent)
1000 Horizontal stripe per 4 dots
Frame frequency [Hz] Display RAM all "0"
Condition: VDD = 2.75V, VDDI = 1.8V, V2 = 6.0V During display, built-in power supply and built-in oscillation circuit on, built-in power supply triple boosting voltage Typical value when Ta = 25C Fig. 11.2 Dynamic current consumption (During display, frame frequency dependent)
Table 11.3 Current Consumption in Power Save Mode GND = 0V, V DD = VDDI = 1.8V, V DD = 2.75V and Ta = 25C. Item

Sleep mode

Symbol IDDS

Condition

Standard value Min. Typ. Max. 1.0 10.0
Unit Applicable pin A VDD, VDDI

4000 3000

2000 1000

Cycle time [MHz]

Condition: VDD = VDDI = 3.0V, built-in power supply and built-in oscillation circuit off Fig. 11.3 Dynamic current consumption (During display RAM access)
Table 11.4 Relation between Oscillated Frequency fOSC, Display Clock Frequency fCL and Frame Frequency of Liquid Crystal Item When built-in oscillation circuit is used fCL 41.6kHz (Typ.) *1 57.6kHz (Typ.) *2 31.2kHz (Typ.) *3 External input (fCL) fFR fCL/Dividing ratio 2 Display duty fCL/Dividing ratio 2 Display duty

When built-in oscillation circuit is not used
*1: When 130Hz frame frequency device is used. *2: When 180Hz frame frequency device is used. *3: When S1D15G00D01*000 is used. fFR represents cycle of framing, not cycle of FR signal. Dividing ratio and display duty are set with the display control command.
DC Characteristics - Supplementary Description *1: Operation is warranted if radical voltage fluctuations occur while MPU is in the process of access. *2: This applies only to RES. *3: D15 to D0 (Input mode) SI, SCL IF1 to IF3, A0, CS, RD (E), WR (R/W), RES, M/S and CLS. *4: D15 to D0 (Input and Output mode) CL, FR SYNC, CA, F1, F2 and DOFF. *5: It represents the resistance value when 0.5V is applied across the output pin SEGn or COMn and respective power terminals (V3, V2, V1, VC, MV1 and MV2). It is specified within the range of the operating voltage (3). RON = 0.5V/I (I is the current conducted when 0.5V is applied across the power supply and output pin). *6: For the relation between oscillated frequency and frame frequency, refer to Table 11.4. The standard value listed in relation to the external input is a recommended value. *7: This is the reference voltage source built into the IC. It is not output to the pin. *8: It indicates the current consumed by the IC alone when the built-in oscillation circuit is in operation and the display is turned on. Condition: display RAM all 0, V2 = 6.0V, triple boosting voltage, no access to the MPU. It does not include current consumed by the LCD panel capacity and wiring capacity.
S1D15G00 Series 11.2 AC Characteristics
System Bus Read/write characteristics I (80 series MPU)
A0 tAW8 CS *1 WR, RD tCCLW, tCCLR tCCHW, tCCHR tCW8 tAH8

CS *2 tCYC, tCYC2 WR, RD

D0 to D7 (Write) D0 to D7 (Read) tACC8
*1 is when access is made with WR and RD when CS is LOW. *2 is when access is made with CS when WR and RD are LOW.

Signal A0 WR, RD,CS

Symbol tAH8 tAW8 tCYC tCYC2 tCCHW tCCHR tCCLW tCCLR tCW8 tDS8 tDH8 tACC8 tOH8
Parameter Address hold time Address setup time Write cycle Read cycle Control pulse HIGH width (write) Control pulse HIGH width (read) Control pulse LOW width (write) Control pulse LOW width (read) CSWR, RD time Data setup time Data hold time Read access time Output disable time
Ta=40 to +85C, VDD=2.6 to 3.6V, VDDI=2.6 to VDD Min. Max. Unit Measuring conditions and others ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

D0 to D7

CL=10 to 100pF
* Rise and fall time of input signal (t r, tf) must be 15 ns maximum. * All timings must be specified using 30% and 70% of VDD-GND as the reference. * tCCLW and tCCLR are specified by the duration during which CS as well as WR and RD are LOW. * A0 timing is specified by the duration during which CS as well as WR and RD are LOW.
Ta=40 to +85C, VDD=2.6 to 3.6V, VDDI=1.7 to 2.6V Min. Max. Unit Measuring conditions and others ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns
* Read/write characteristics II (68 series MPU)

A0, R/W

CS *1 E
tAH6 tCCHW, tCCHR tCCLW, tCCLR tCW6

CS *2 E

tCYC, tCYC2
D0 to D7 (Write) D0 to D7 (Read)

tDS6 tACC6

tDH6 tOH6
* 1 is when access is made with E when CS is LOW. * 2 is when access is made with CS when E is LOW. Ta =40 to +85C, V DD=2.6 to 3.6V, VDDI=2.6 to VDD Min. Max. Unit Measuring conditions and others ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

Signal A0, R/W E, CS

Symbol tAH6 tAW6 tCYC tCYC2 tCCLW tCCLR tCCHW tCCHR tCW6 tDS6 tDH6 tACC6 tOH6
Parameter Address hold time Address setup time Write cycle Read cycle Control pulse LOW width (write) Control pulse LOW width (read) Control pulse HIGH width (write) Control pulse HIGH width (read) CSE time Data setup time Data hold time Read access time Output disable time
* Rise and fall time of input signal (tr, tf) must be 15 ns maximum. * All timings must be specified using 30% and 70% of VDDVSS as the reference. * tCCHW and tCCHR are specified by the duration during which CS is LOW and E is HIGH. * A0 and R/W timings are specified by the duration during which CS is LOW and E is HIGH.
Ta =40 to +85C, VDD=2.6 to 3.6V, VDDI=1.7 to 2.6V Min. Max. Unit Measuring conditions and others ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

* Reset timing

Internal control Reset in operation Normal operation
Ta =40 to +85C, V DD=2.6 to 3.6V, VDDI=1.7 to VDD Signal RES Symbol tRW tRT Parameter Reset pulse width Reset cancel Min. Max. Unit ns ns Measuring conditions and others
Rise and fall time of input signal (tr, tf) must be 15 ns maximum. All timings must be specified using 20% and 80% of VDDVSS as the reference.

S1D15G00D00B100

Connected to V3R Connected to V2R Connected to V1R Connected to VCR Connected to MV1R Connected to MV3R

Signals to/from S1F65170

Signals from MPU
Connected to MV3L Connected to MV1L Connected to VCL Connected to V1L Connected to V2L Connected to V3L
V3L V2L V1L VCL VCLSL MV1L MV3L TESTA TESTB TESTC TESTD TESTE TESTF TESTG CAP2+ CAP2 CAP1+ CAP1 GND2 GND3 GND VDD3 VDD4 VDD VDDI FR YSCL F1 F2 DOFF CA SYNC SLP SDA RESET CLOCK TEST1 GND VDDI CL CLS GND VDDI CS A0 GND VDDI SCL S1 GND VDDI D0 to D7 GND VDDI D8 to D15 GND VDDI RD WR GND VDDI IF1 IF2 IF3 GND VDDI RES TESTH M/S VDDI GND GND4 VDD VDD5 VDD2 CAP4+ CAP4 CAP5+ CAP5 MV3R MV1R VCLSR/VR VCR V1R V2R V3R

COM160 COM81

SEG1 SEG396
LCD Panel 132 RGB 160 dots

COM80 COM1

S1D15G00 Series 13.2 When peripheral split resistor is used
In the following example, the S1D15G00D01B100 chip is used and the following parameters are set. Power voltages: VDDI=1.8 V, VDD=2.7 V Interface: 8-bit parallel interface Primary boosting: 3 times Clock: The built-in oscillator circuit is used. V2 voltages: Set by external split resistors Capacitors: A bypass capacitor is used between VDD and GND pins. A voltage regulator capacitor is used between GND and each of V2, V1, VC and MV1 pins. Connect them by observing the current consumption and voltage waveforms.

S1D15G00D01B100

Connected to V3R Connected to V2R Connected to V1R Connected to VCR Connected to MV1R Connected to MV3R V3L V2L V1L VCL VCLSL MV1L MV3L TESTA TESTB TESTC TESTD TESTE TESTF TESTG CAP2+ CAP2 CAP1+ CAP1 GND2 GND3 GND VDD3 VDD4 VDD VDDI FR YSCL F1 F2 DOFF CA SYNC SLP SDA RESET CLOCK TEST1 GND VDDI CL CLS GND VDDI CS A0 GND VDDI SCL S1 GND VDDI D0 to D7 GND VDDI D8 to D15 GND VDDI RD WR GND VDDI IF1 IF2 IF3 GND VDDI RES TESTH M/S VDDI GND GND4 VDD VDD5 VDD2 CAP4+ CAP4 CAP5+ CAP5 MV3R MV1R VCLSR/VR VCR V1R V2R V3R

1.8V 2.7V

series chips provide the Write and Read functions to write the Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio into and read them from the peripheral EEPROM (S1F65170). Using the Write and Read functions, you can store these values appropriate to each LCP panel.
14. EEPROM INTERFACE The S1D15G00D00* 100 and S1D15G00D05* 100

Notes: As the EPCTIN, EPCWR and EPCRD commands require the following processing times, use a software timer or insert a process to loop the operation by monitoring the status read value of D2 (Access to EEPROM). If these times are insufficient, the Read or Write operation may fail. 1 EPCTIN
14.1 Conditions when EEPROM read/write is performed
1 The built-in oscillator circuit is already operating. 2 The CL division by 2 and 160 display lines have been set by the Display Control command.
5 (sec) fosc / (sec) fosc / 320

2 EPCWR

14.2 EEPROM writing instructions
1. Issue the VOLCTR command to set the appropriate Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio. 2. Issue the EPCTIN command to select the Control EEPROM mode (for data writing). 3. Issue the EPMWR command to write data into the EEPROM. 4. Issue the EPCTOUT command to cancel the EEPROM Control mode.

3 EPCRD

10 (sec) fosc / 4

14.4 Connection example

S1D15G00 and S1F65170 connection example. VDD for both chips is connected to the same potential.
14.3 EEPROM data reading instructions
1. Issue the EPCTIN command to select the EEPROM Control mode (for data reading). 2. Issue the EPMRD command to read data from the EEPROM. 3. Issue the EPCTOUT command to cancel the EEPROM Control mode and updates the Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio using the read data. Miscellaneous: The MPU can read the Electronic Control value and built-in resistance ratio by issuing a combination of EPSRRD1 or EPSRRD2 and STREAD (Status Read) commands.
VDD GND SDA CLOCK RESET VDD SDA SCK XRST GND

S1F65170M0A00

15. CAUTIONS
Concerning this development specification, users are advised to pay attention to the following precautions. 1. This development specification is subject to modifications without previous notice. 2. This development specification does not grant the industrial property right or any other right, or exercising such rights. Application examples contained in this document are intended only to help users to understand the product better. SEIKO EPSON shall not be liable to any circuitrelated problem resulted from using these examples. Users are requested to pay attention to the following points when using S1D15G00 series. Precautions on Light Characteristics of semiconductor devices can be changed when exposed to light as described in the operational principles of solar batteries. Exposing this IC to light, therefore, can potentially lead to its malfunctioning. 1 Care must be exercised in designing the operation system and mounting the IC so that it may not be exposed light during operation 2 Care must be exercised in designing the inspection process and handling the IC so that it may not be exposed to light during the process. 3 The IC must be shielded from light in the front, back and side faces.

Precautions on External Noises 1 Internal state of S1D15G00 can be changed when exposed to adversely affecting external factors such as excessive noises though it can maintain the command-instructed operational status and display data. Thus, you must make sure when mounting the IC and designing the operation system that measures for eliminating noises or measures protecting the IC from noises are prepared. 2 In order to be prepared against sudden noise, it is recommended to prepare the software to perform periodic refreshing of operational state (re-setting of commands and re-transfer of display data). Precautions on Mounting COG When mounting COG, you must take into consideration of resistance component generated across the driver chip and externally connected parts (capacitor and resistor) resulting from ITO wiring. This resistance component can interfere with high-speed operation of liquid crystal display or MPU. When mounting COG, you must take into consideration of the following three points in the module design: 1. To minimize resistance between the driver chip pin to the external part. 2. To minimize resistance at the power terminal of the driver chip. 3. To develop sample COG modules with varying degrees of ITO sheet resistance in order to select one with the sheet resistance allowing sufficient operational margins.

 

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