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Alesis Data Disk

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Alesis Data DiskHosa DB9 to DB9 Double Shielded Sync Cord for ADAT CMT405DS
Hosa's friends at Alesis use 9-pin "D-Sub" cables to synchronize two or more ADAT or ADAT-XT digital multitrack recorders, and to connect their BRC remote ... – Read full description on adorama.com

Details
Brand: Hosa
Part Numbers: CMT 405DS, CMT-405DS, CMT405DS, HOUDBPDB95
UPC: 728736001923, 728736002166

 

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Comments to date: 9. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
LarkinVB 4:17pm on Wednesday, October 6th, 2010 
I am mostly on move for business. I carry lots of data every time and this drive is my constant partner.
be2be 1:26pm on Thursday, September 16th, 2010 
I was intending to buy a network storage that offers content sharing with advanced security. I love red color. I take this stylish ruby red rugged for all my travels. It is compact and quick.
rajib 12:57am on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 
The zip drive is more flexible then burning files to a CD ( it is not permanent ). The Iomega Zip drive product is one we have used for many years.
AbuRasheed 2:22am on Thursday, September 2nd, 2010 
Overall a nice product. Two formats I regularly use on my computer and like to see on the screenplay are MKV and RMVB. I am a mobile DJ and I purchased this because many of my gigs are set in a dark atmosphere. This product works perfectly.
webpac 11:48pm on Saturday, July 24th, 2010 
highly recommend this product easy install, small footprint, good looking product none so far My husband LOVED this gift! Giant storage capability - you can back up the Universe on this thing!
radicalkat 10:16pm on Friday, June 11th, 2010 
The bold colors really make your labels stick out and the variety allows for visibility and easier organizing. Easy To Read Print,Good Colors. It is going quiet well. I am a kind of user who let me laptop run almost 20 hours a day. Easy To Install,Highly Compatible,Quiet,Reliable Great for marking disks. Easy To Read Print,Glides Smoothly,Good Colors,Ink Applies Evenly,Ink Dries Quickly,Long Lasting Ink
ranty 1:05am on Tuesday, May 11th, 2010 
"I was given this drive as a gift for Christmas, and I can tell you right now its a life saver. "For my $ this is a good deal. Very rugged & saw on-line how it can be dropped from a ceiling & still work." Rugged.
Joe He 2:16pm on Friday, April 9th, 2010 
I have found Zip/Rev disks to be the most reliable hard disk backup system yet developed. Tapes are slow and unreliable.
jkral 7:17pm on Tuesday, March 23rd, 2010 
Wealth of Features, Built Like a Tank, Screaming Fast Horrifically Flawed Software Fast, Quiet; integrated USB and FireWire 400 hub, RUGGED, BE I DID NOT LIKE THE INCLUDED BACKUP SOFTWARE AT ALL. (USE "SU

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

ALESIS Data Disk

Reference Manual

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION.... 2

FEATURES.... 2 HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL... 3
SECTION 1 DATADISK QUICK START... 4
TO FORMAT A DISK.... 4 RECEIVING ONE MIDI DATA FILE FOR STORAGE.. 4 RECEIVING MULTIPLE MIDI DATA FILES FOR STORAGE.. 4 SENDING A SINGLE STORED FILE... 5 SENDING MULTIPLE STORED FILES... 5
SECTION 2 DESCRIPTION OF CONTROLS... 6
FRONT PANEL.... 1/2" DISK DRIVE... 6 LCD DISPLAY.... 6 SCROLL.... 6 NAME... 6 RECEIVE.... 6 SEND... 6 DELETE.... 6 BACKUP... 7 DO/YES.... 7 REQUEST.... 7 INFO.... 7 MIDI.... 7 FORMAT... 7 POWER.... 7 BACKPANEL.... 7 MIDI IN.... 8 MIDI OUT.... 8 POWER.... 8 DATADISK FRONT AND BACK PANEL... 9
SECTION 3 INTERFACING DATADISK... 10
DATADISK CONNECTED TO A SINGLE MIDI DEVICE.. 10 HANDSHAKING.... 10 DATADISK USED TO STORE HR-16/MMT-8 SEQUENCES.. 12 DATADISK IN A MORE COMPLEX MIDI SETUP.. 13
SECTION 4 DATADISK FUNCTIONS.... 14
THEORY OF OPERATION... 14 SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE... 14 RECEIVE MODES.... 14 SOFTWARE FUNCTIONS.... 15 RECEIVE MIDI DATA FUNCTION... 16 RECV ONE SYSEX... 16 RECV MULT SYSEX... 16 SEND MIDI DATA FUNCTIONS... 16 SEND FILE XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ.. 16
SEND ALL FILES... 16 DELETE FILE FROM DISK FUNCTION... 17 DEL NNNKXXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ.. 17 DELETE ALL FILES... 17 DISK BACKUP FUNCTIONS... 17 BACKUP XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ.. 17 BACKUP ALL FILES... 18 BACKUP TO MIDI.... 18 REQUEST FUNCTION.... 18 REQUEST SAMPLE DUMP XX... 18 REQUEST SYSEX FOR YYYYYY.. 18 DISK INFO FUNCTION... 19 XX FILES = ZZZ% YYY Kbytes free.. 19 NNNNN XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ.. 19 SOFTWARE VERSION... 19 MIDI FUNCTIONS.... 19 MIDI ECHO.... 19 RCV PROGRAM CHANGE... 20 FORMAT DISK FUNCTION... 20 NAME FILE FUNCTION... 20 RENAME XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ.. 20 SELECT CHARACTER... 20 DISK STATUS AND INFO MESSAGES... 20 NO DISK IN DRIVE.... 21 DISK UNFORMATTED.... 21 DISK WRITE PROTECTED... 22 DISK EMPTY.... 22 DISK FULL.... 22 OPERATION ABORTED... 22 DUPLICATE FILE NAME... 23 MAXIMUM NUMBER OF FILES... 23 NOT ENOUGH DISK SPACE.. 23 MIDI OVERFLOW TRY RECV MULT.. 23 ERROR IN SYSEX ERROR ON DISK... 23 TARGET UNIT NOT RESPONDING... 24
SECTION 5 OPERATION.... 25
TO FORMAT A DISK.... 25 TO RECEIVE A FILE.... 26 TO RECEIVE MULTIPLE FILES... 27 TO REQUEST A DUMP... 28 PRODUCT SPECIFIC DUMP REQUEST.. 29 TO RENAME A FILE... 30 TO SEND A FILE... 31 TO SEND ALL FILES.... 32 TO DELETE (ERASE) A FILE FROM DISK... 33 TO DELETE (ERASE) ALL FILES FROM DISK.. 34 TO SET MIDI ECHO... 35 TO SET UP A MIDI PROGRAM CHANGE... 35 TO DISPLAY AVAILABLE DISK SPACE... 36 TO DISPLAY FILE INFORMATION... 36 TO BACKUP A FILE... 37 TO BACKUP AN ENTIRE DISK... 39 TO BACKUP AN ENTIRE DISK OVER MIDI TO ANOTHER DATADISK. 40
SECTION 6 REAL-TIME MIDI SEQUENCE PLAYBACK... 41
TO RECEIVE A MIDI SEQUENCE... 41 TO SEND A MIDI SEQUENCE... 43 SYNCING DATADISK TO A SEQUENCER... 44
APPLICATIONS.... 47 STORAGE OF DATADISK MIDI SETUP PER DISK.. 48 TO STORE THE DATADISK... 48

SECTION 7 APPENDEX... 49

TROUBLESHOOTING.... 49 PROBLEM SAVING TO DISK... 49 RECEIVING INSTRUMENT WON'T RECEIVE... 49 SPECIFICATIONS.... 51 BOOKS ON MIDI... 52 VIDEOS ON MIDI.... 52

Alesis DATADISK

Direct MIDI to Disk/Universal Data Storage

USERS MANUAL

INTRODUCTION
Direct MIDI to Disk /Universal Data Storage
The DATADISK is a real-time MIDI data storage and retrieval unit capable of storing 800K bytes of data onto a 3 1/2" floppy diskette. Unlike similar units which store data to a large RAM (Random Access Memory) buffer before processing, data in DATADISK is stored and retrieved directly from disk so there is no waiting for large RAM buffers to fill. The disk functions are used to transfer data between the disk drive and MIDI. Because the disk size is fixed, data can not exceed 800K bytes. Each disk can hold 53 MIDI data files, but the total size of the data cannot exceed the maximum disk size, or 800K. As an additional benefit, DATADISK is universal in that it will read virtually all manufacturers system exclusive data without updating software. A large 16 character by 2 line LCD display is fitted to make the functions and operations faster, easier, and less cryptic.

FEATURES Instantly expands memory of any synthesizer or sequencer, drum machine, or effects processor
Easier, safer, and faster than tape backup Will store MIDI System Exclusive data from virtually any manufacturer Uses standard 3 1/2" floppy diskettes Stores up to 800K of data per disk SEND ALL command allows sending stored data to all MIDI devices in

your systems at once

HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL
Since a musician's time is better spent making music than reading manuals, we've tried to make this manual not only easy to use, but also fast and easy to find things when you need to. Therefore, the manual is broken down to 6 major sections, of which Section 5 will be probably be referred to the most. They are: SECTION 1 - QUICKSTART This section tells you how to use the most frequently needed operations. If you have to use your DATADISK now but don't have the time to read the entire manual, Section 1 will quickly guide you through. SECTION 2 - DESCRIPTION OF CONTROLS This section gives a brief explanation of all front panel and rear panel controls and indicators. SECTION 3 - INTERFACING DATADISK Section 3 deals with the interfacing of DATADISK to another MIDI device or into a MIDI system. SECTION 4 - DATADISK FUNCTIONS Section 4 gives an overview of the software functions and pages of DATADISK. SECTION 5 - OPERATION This section will probably be the most used part of the manual as it describes how to execute every function in a step by step manner. Actual display readouts of DATADISK are also included. SECTION 6 - REAL-TIME MIDI SEQUENCE PLAYBACK This section decribes the DataDisk's Real-Time MIDI sequence recording and playback functions. SECTION 7 - APPENDIX Section 6 provides a simple troubleshooting guide and operational specifications for DATADISK.

SECTION 1

DATADISK QUICK START

TO FORMAT A DISK

DATADISK will use any standard 3 1/2" double sided, double density floppy diskette, but first the disk must be customized for use in DATADISK. This is called "Formatting".
1) Insert Disk 2) Press the FORMAT button. "FORMAT DISK?". The display will read:

3) Press the DO/YES button. The display will read: "ARE YOU SURE?" 4) Press the DO/YES button again to initiate formatting. DATADISK will proceed to format the disk and will tell you what its doing. 5) When formatting is complete, the display will return to "FORMAT DISK?" once again. You can now begin a Receive operation by pressing the RECEIVE button.
RECEIVING ONE MIDI DATA FILE FOR STORAGE
1) Press the RECEIVE button. The display will read "RECV ONE SYSEX: WAITING FOR DATA". 2) Send the MIDI exclusive file from the sequencer, synthesizer, or sampler. The display will tell you that it's receiving the data. 3) When the transmission is complete, the DATADISK will display that the file has been stored and assign a file number.
RECEIVING MULTIPLE MIDI DATA FILES FOR STORAGE
1) Press the RECEIVE button twice. The display will read "RECV MULT SYSEX: WAITING FOR DATA".

QUICK START

2) Send the MIDI exclusive files from the sequencer, synthesizer, or sampler. The display will tell you that it's receiving the data. 3) At the end of the data transmission, the DATADISK will ask if the file is complete. Send more data or press the YES button to store all of the data received into one file.
SENDING A SINGLE STORED FILE
1) Press the SEND button. The display will show a file. 2) Press SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN button until the desired program is displayed. 3) Press the DO/YES button to send the program.
PLEASE NOTE: Files are displayed alphabetically by manufacturer, product, and user name.
SENDING MULTIPLE STORED FILES
1) Press the SEND button twice. The display will ask "SEND ALL FILES?". 2) Press the DO/YES button to begin transmission of the files. The display will show each file as it is sent.

SECTION 2

DESCRIPTION OF CONTROLS FRONT PANEL

3 1/2" DISK DRIVE

The disk drive accepts standard double sided, double density (DD) 3 1/2" floppy diskettes, the same as those used in many synthesizers, samplers, and computers. Each disk will store up to 53 MIDI data files as long as the total size of file data does not exceed a maximum of 800K.

LCD DISPLAY

The LCD Display shows the current DATADISK operating status and allows you to view files stored on the diskette. The display features 2 lines of up to 16 characters each.

SCROLL

The SCROLL buttons are used to view either the files of a diskette, select a file, digit, or character, or abort an operation.

FIGURE 3 DATADISK USED TO STORE HR-16/MMT-8 SEQUENCES
MIDI THRU MIDI IN HR-16/HR-16:B Drum Machine Tone Module MIDI OUT

MMT-8 MIDI Sequencer

DATADISK IN A MORE COMPLEX MIDI SETUP
If you are using DATADISK with a number of other MIDI devices, you may wish to use a programmable MIDI patcher to route their MIDI inputs and outputs to DATADISK's MIDI input and output. This will enable you to perform loads and dumps to and from any or all of your MIDI devices without having to manually change any of your connections. FIGURE 4 DATADISK IN A MORE COMPLEX MIDI SETUP

In Out In

QuadraVerb/MIDIVERB III
Tone Module Out Out In Out In Tone Module Out MMT-8 MIDI Sequencer HR-16/HR-16:B Drum Machine In Tone Module
Out MIDI Switcher/Patchbay
DATADISK ALL CONNECTIONS ARE MIDI

DATADISK FUNCTIONS

SECTION 4

THEORY OF OPERATION

SYSTEM EXCLUSIVE
DATADISK is able to work because the data is stored in the form of
System Exclusive (or sysex) files. System Exclusive is the unique way that each manufacturer identifies its own particular data. This allows data from one manufacturers equipment not to be mistaken for another manufacturers when it is sent and stored. When DATADISK is in the Receive mode, either the first byte, or the first three bytes, of information received is the manufacturer ID. In most cases,DATADISK will identify both the brand and model of the equipment that it receives the system exclusive data from. If the data is from an unknown manufacturer, DATADISK will display "ID xxH" for 1 byte IDs or "xxxxxx" for 3-byte ids (where xx or xxxxxx is the manufacturer ID number in hexidecimal) instead of the manufacturer's name. This will not confuse how the data is stored by DATADISK, or loaded by the unknown piece of equipment, however.

RECEIVE MODES

DATADISK normally receives data in the Receive One Sysex mode. After the manufacturer ID bytes identify the unit, DATADISK begins
storing data to disk and continues until it receives an End System Exclusive command. Some synthesizers or MIDI devices will send multiple messages, one after the other, which DATADISK will recognize and still save under the same file as long as there is no more than 1/2 second delay between the end of one message and the beginning of the next. If there is more than 1/2 second but less than 1 second, then DATADISK will have stored the first file but will not have had enough time to store the directory of that file before the next set of MIDI messages arrive. When this occurs, DATADISK will display "MIDI OVERFLOW" and suggest that you use Receive Mult mode. 15
If the delay between messages is more than 1 second, DATADISK will store the next set of sysex messages in a new file. This is particularly advantageous if you are saving an entire MIDI equipment system, where you would first send out your MMT-8 data, then your HR-16 data, then QuadraVerb data, etc. In this case you would want each piece of gear to have its own file and that just the way that DATADISK stores it. If you have a synthesizer that requires that different sections of the same file be sent separately (as in the case of the Yamaha TX802 which sends voice data and function data separately), then you would probably want to use the Receive Mult mode since you would want these different sections of data to be in a single file. In this case, DD doesn't care how long it has to wait between messages. It will continue to put everything into one file until you tell it to stop receiving.

SOFTWARE FUNCTIONS

There are nine functions in the DATADISK which allow the user to send and receive MIDI data, prepare a disk for send/receive operations, and view files stored on the disk. Each function has several choices, called pages, which further allows the user to tailor the function to his specific needs. These functions are selected by pushing the appropriate function button, and the pages are chosen by then pressing the same function button repeatedly until the desired page is displayed. All operations are then initiated by pressing the DO/YES button. The current digit value of a parameter is displayed on the LCD within the relevant page. An underline under the left most digit of a value indicates that this value can be edited. Values are edited by pressing the SCROLL buttons. Files are viewed in alphabetical order by manufacturer, with numbers coming before letters. Exceptions to the rule are the following: Unknown manufacturer names (either displayed as "Id xxH" or "xxxxxx") are displayed after known manufacturer names. Unknown product names are left blank and are displayed after known product names within each manufacturer. Sample dump files are displayed after all manufacturer specific files. 16
RECEIVE MIDI DATA FUNCTION
The RECEIVE MIDI Data Function is used to store MIDI system exclusive data received from a synthesizer, sequencer, or effects processor to a floppy disk inside the DATADISK. There are two pages to this function which are:

RECV ONE SYSEX

Receive One Sysex (the display will read "RECV ONE SYSEX:") is used to receive a single system exclusive file over MIDI. One sysex (system exclusive) file may be a single program or a complete dump from a synthesizer, sampler, or sequencer.

RECV MULT SYSEX

In this mode, system exclusive data from multiple products is received by DATADISK and stored as a single file. This makes it fast and easy to locate the file and load the data back into the multiple synthesizers or devices at a later time. The display will read "RECV MULT SYSEX".

SEND MIDI DATA FUNCTIONS

The SEND MIDI Data Function is used to send MIDI system exclusive files to a synthesizer, sequencer, or effects processor. There are two pages to this function which are:
SEND FILE XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ
This page is used to send a single system exclusive file over MIDI, where XXXXXX is the manufacturers name of the file stored on disk, YYYYYY is the product model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file to send. Files are selected by pressing the SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN buttons until the desired file is displayed. The files are viewed alphabetically.

SEND ALL FILES

In this page, all files stored on the disk will be sent over MIDI to their respective instruments. This way, an entire setup of a number of instruments, sequencers, samplers, and processors can quickly be sent from just this one page.

TO RECEIVE MULTIPLE FILES
Multiple system exclusive files from multiple products can be received and stored as a single file by using a Receive Multiple Files page. In this mode, DATADISK is able to receive as many sysex messages as desired (up to the limit of available disk space), and save them all into one disk file. To enter this function, do the following: 1) Press the RECEIVE button on the front panel twice. The display will change to the following:
RECV MULT SYSEX: WAITING FOR DATA
2) Send a Sysex dump from the synthesizer, sequencer, effects processor, or other MIDI device. This may be called a "Bulk Dump", "File Transfer", or some other indication that multiple files will be transmitted (check your manual for the correct name and procedure). When system exclusive data is detected, the display will read the following: RECEIVING XXXXXX YYYYYY In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, and YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name. If the data received is a MIDI sample dump, the manufacturer and product name will be displayed as "Sample Dump". In the multiple mode, DATADISK is going to receive information until the user decides that all of the data has been loaded. After each sysex is received, the display will change to the following: IS THIS FILE COMPLETE? If no button is pressed, the display will revert to the "RECEIVING XXXXXX YYYYYY" message if additional sysex data is received, and will continue to save the data to the same file. If the DO/YES button is pressed, telling DATADISK that transmission is complete, the file will be stored to disk under the last received message's manufacturer and model names. 3) Exit the function by pressing another function button.

TO REQUEST A DUMP

This function allows the user to request sample dumps from MIDI devices which require a request before sending sample dump data. 30
1) Press the REQUEST button on the front panel. The display will read: REQUEST SAMPLE DUMP XX? XX is the sample number (may be called "Program Number") between 00 and 99 requested by DATADISK from the sampler connected to the MIDI input. 2) Select the correct sample number by using the SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN buttons. 3) Press the DO/YES button to transmit a request. The transfer is handled as in the Receive MIDI data function.

PRODUCT SPECIFIC DUMP REQUEST
Product specific dumps for products that can't initiate dumps from their own front panel can be requested by DATADISK. Do the following: 1) Press the REQUEST button on the front panel twice. The display will read: REQUEST SYSEX FOR YYYYYY? 2) Select the desired manufacturer by using the SCROLL UP and SCROLL DOWN buttons. The selections will be viewed alphabetically. 3) Press the DO/YES button. The display will read: REQUEST YYYYYY XXXXXX? 4) Select the desired product by using the SCROLL UP and SCROLL DOWN buttons. Each manufacturer will have its models listed. Press the REQUEST button to return to the manufacturer select page.
5) Press the DO/YES button to transmit a request. The transfer is handled as in the Receive MIDI data function.

TO RENAME A FILE

When a file is received, it is given a name and number in the order that it was received. For instance, the first file is named "File 01", the second "File 02", etc. A file can be renamed with a name up to 8 characters long using the Rename function. To Rename a file, do the following: 1) Press the NAME button on the front panel. The display will then read: RENAME XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? 2) To scan the disk to select the desired file, press the SCROLL UP and SCROLL DOWN buttons until the desired file is found. Files are displayed alphabetically by manufacturer. 3) When the desired file is found, press the DO/YES button. An underline will now appear under the first character of the name as shown below, indicating that it is ready for editing. RENAME XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? 4) Select the desired letter, number, or character from the keypad. Each function key except NAME and DO/YES has the numbers or letters which can be accessed marked directly below it. RECEIVE
ABCDE 4a) Press the function key repeatedly until the desired letter, number, or character appears. Press the FORMAT button for a space (blank character). A space will automatically increment to the next character. 4b) Press the SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN buttons to move the cursor to the desired location. This will appear in the display as: 33
RENAME XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ?
4c) Repeat steps 4a and 4b until all characters are changed as desired. 5) When the file has been renamed, complete the operation by pressing the DO/YES button. This brings us back to the beginning of the Rename function, allowing other files to be selected to be renamed, if desired. 6) Exit the Rename function by pressing another function button.
PLEASE NOTE: To remain in the Name function without storing the newly edited

name, press the NAME button again. This will recall the original name.
If a file with the same name already exists, the following message will temporarily appear and the newly edited name will not be stored to disk. DUPLICATE FILE NAME
DATADISK will then return to the beginning of the Rename

function.

TO SEND A FILE
1) Press the SEND button on the front panel. The display will read: SEND FILE XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file to send. 2) Select the desired file by pressing the SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN buttons until the desired file is displayed (files are viewed alphabetically). 34
3) Press the DO/YES button to send the file. While the file is being sent, the display will read: SENDING: XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file being sent. After sending is complete, DATADISK will return to the start of the Send data function with the next file ready to be sent. 4) Exit the Send function by pressing another function button.

TO SEND ALL FILES

All system exclusive files stored on the disk can be sent by using the Send All mode. This makes setup of an entire MIDI system very fast and easy since all files will be sent with just one command, and all MIDI units will instantly reset as soon as their system exclusive file data is received. To accomplish a Send All command, do the following: 1) Press the SEND button on the front panel. The display will read: SEND FILE XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file to send. 2) Press the SEND button a second time. The display will read: SEND ALL FILES?
3) Press the DO/YES button to send the files. While the file is being sent, the display will read: SENDING: XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file being sent. The display will change with the file name for every file sent during the Send All Files function. There is a 25 millisecond delay between each sysex message transmitted. 4) Exit the Send function by pressing another function button.
TO DELETE (ERASE) A FILE FROM DISK
1) Press the DELETE button on the front panel. The following display will appear. DEL NNNK: XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? In this display, NNN is the size of the selected file in kilobytes, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file to be erased. 2) Select the desired file by pressing the SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN buttons until the desired file is displayed (files are viewed alphabetically). 3) Press the DO/YES button. The display will then read: ARE YOU SURE?

TO BACKUP A FILE

1) Press the BACKUP button on the front panel. The display will read: BACKUP XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file to be backed up. 2) Select the desired file by pressing the SCROLL UP or SCROLL DOWN buttons until the desired file is displayed (files are viewed alphabetically). 3) Press the DO/YES button. The display will then read: XX DISK SWAPS REQUIRED. OK? XX is the number of times that the source (the disk currently in DATADISK) and destination disks (the one that 40
you will backup your file to) must be inserted and removed from the disk drive. 4) Press the DO/YES button again. The display will show: PLEASE INSERT BACKUP DISK. OK? 5) Eject the source disk, insert the backup disk, and press the DO/YES button. The display will briefly read: Checking Disk
The display will then show:
XX PLEASE INSERT ORIG DISK. OK? XX denotes the number of disk swaps remaining. 6) After ejecting the backup disk and inserting the source disk, press the DO/YES button again. The display will briefly read: Reading from the Original Disk. Then the display will read: XX PLEASE INSERT BACKUP DISK. OK? 7) After ejecting the backup disk and inserting the source disk, press the DO/YES button again. The display will briefly read: Writing to the Backup Disk. After backup is complete, the following is temporarily displayed before DATADISK returns to the start of the Backup function.
BACKUP COMPLETE 8) Backup another file or exit the Backup function by pressing another function button. 9) Check backup procedure by sending the backed-up file(s) to their appropriate destinations and checking the data.
PLEASE NOTE: If the backup disk contains a file with same name as the file selected to be backed up, the display will prompt: REPLACE FILE WITH SAME NAME? Pressing the DO/YES button will proceed to delete the file on the backup disk, before starting backup. Pressing any other function will exit the backup.
Backup can be aborted at any time by pressing any other function button.

TO BACKUP AN ENTIRE DISK

1) Press the BACKUP button on the front panel. The display will read: BACKUP XXXXXX YYYYYY ZZZZZZZZ? In this display, XXXXXX is an abbreviation of the manufacturer's name of the device sending the data, YYYYYY is an abbreviation of the model name, and ZZZZZZZZ is the name of the file to be backed up. 2) Press the BACKUP button a second time. The display will read: BACKUP ALL FILES TO DISK? 3) Press the DO/YES button. The display will then read: XX DISK SWAPS REQUIRED. OK? XX is the number of times that the source (the disk currently in DATADISK) and destination disks (the one that you will backup your file to) must be inserted and removed from the disk drive. 4) Follow steps 4 through 9 as in "To Backup A File".

4) To exit this display, press any function button. PLEASE NOTE: a) The MIDI Echo (MIDI Thru) function is ignored when in the Receive MIDI Sequence mode. b) When recording to a sequencer from the DataDisk, keep in mind that the incoming data is subject to the quantize resolution that the sequencer is currently set at. c) In all circumstances of handshaking, do not echo data being sent from the DataDisk through a sequencer and back into 46
the DataDisk. If this is done, the sequencer will crash and most likely lose all of its data. MONITORING A SEQUENCE BEING SENT TO DATADISK

Out IN

MIDI THRU BOX

TO SEND A MIDI SEQUENCE

1) Press the SEND button. 2) Press one of the SCROLL buttons until the desired sequence is displayed. The display will read: SEND FILE MIDI Seqnce FILE ZZ ? FILE ZZ is the desired MIDI Sequence name. 3) Press the DO/YES button to play back the sequence. The display will read: SENDING : MIDI Seqnce FILE ZZ When playback is complete, the display will return to the start of the send function with the next file ready to be sent. If the sequence sent was the last file, the display will revert to: SEND FILE MIDI Seqnce FILE ZZ ?
The same sequence can be played back again by pressing the DO/YES button, or another sequence or sysex file can be selected by pressing the SCROLL buttons. If, while playing back a sequence, you decide that you wish to abort the operation, press either of the SCROLL buttons. The display will briefly read: OPERATION ABORTED The display will then return to the Send File MIDI Sequence page. If a MIDI Sequence is aborted while being sent or if a MIDI Stop command is received while the file is being sent, the DataDisk will automatically send the following: 1) MIDI Stop Command 2) Controller #64 "sustain pedal" OFF (all 16 channels) 3) Note-offs for all playing notes (all 16 channels) NOTE: The DataDisk will not merge MIDI data being sent with data being received when the MIDI Echo function is enabled.
MONITORING DATA BEING SENT FROM THE DATADISK TO ANOTHER SEQUENCER

Midi Echo On

Note that the MMT-8's countdown should be set to 00 and its MIDI Echo set to ON.
SYNCING DATADISK TO A SEQUENCER

It is possible to have the DataDisk play along in sync with an external sequencer or drum machine. 1) Press the MIDI button three times. The display will read: 48
EXT MIDI SYNC OFF 2) Press the "up" SCROLL button. read: EXT MIDI SYNC ON The display will now
3) Now press the SEND button. The display will read: SEND FILE MIDI Seqnce FILE ZZ ? 4) Use the SCROLL buttons to select the desired sequence to playback. 5) When the desired sequence is found, press the DO/YES button. The display will then read: Waiting for MIDI Start/Continue.
6) Start the external sequencer or drum machine. Once a MIDI Start or Continue command is received, the display will read: SENDING: MIDI Seqnce File ZZ Where File ZZ is a file name (the same as sending any other file).
PLEASE NOTE: a) The sequence recorded by the DataDisk MUST be recorded with MIDI clock in order to use the external sync feature. If the file does not contain MIDI clock, then all file data will be sent with the first MIDI CLOCK received. b) DataDisk will assume that the start of the MIDI Sequence file is the start of the song, as far as Start, Continue, and Song Position Pointer commands are concerned. For example, if the sequence was recorded 49
in the DataDisk starting at bar 2, beat 1, then that point becomes the beginning of the sequence as far as DataDisk is concerned. When the file is played back from the DataDisk (synced to MIDI Clock), a Start command will start playing from the beginning of the file, which will be 1 bar ahead of the original sequence's start location. Continue and Song Position Pointer commands will be 1 bar ahead of the original sequence's location as well. c) Since a Continue command may occur anywhere within a MIDI Sequence File, there may be a slight delay while the DataDisk searches through the disk for the specified location before executing the command. The DataDisk will, however, remain in sync. d) If, while syncing to an external sequencer, the DataDisk is connected to the sequencer (such as an MMT-8) in a MIDI loop (that is, sequencer MIDI output to DataDisk MIDI input and DataDisk MIDI output to Sequencer MIDI input as in figures 2A and 4 of the DataDisk user's manual), then either the MIDI Clock must be filtered from the DataDisk's output, or the sequencer should be set to not receive MIDI Clock. This is done to make sure that the speed of the sequence playback remains constant, and is accomplished in the following manner: 1) Press the MIDI button four times. The display will then read: MIDI CLOCK OUT FILTER: OFF
2) Press the "up" SCROLL button. The display will read:
MIDI CLOCK OUT FILTER: ON This means that when the sequence is sent, MIDI Clock, Song Position Pointer (SPP), Start, Stop, and Continue messages are filtered out (not sent), thereby preventing these messages from interfering with the timing of the sequencer that the DataDisk is syncing to.

SYNCING DataDisk TO A SEQUENCER
It is possible to have the DataDisk play along in sync with an external sequencer or drum machine. 1) Press the MIDI button three times. The display will read: EXT MIDI SYNC OFF 2) Press the "up" SCROLL button. The display will now read:

EXT MIDI SYNC ON

Now press the SEND button. The display will read: SEND FILE MIDI Seqnce FILE ZZ ?

4) playback.

Use the SCROLL buttons to select the desired sequence to
5) When the desired sequence is found, press the DO/YES button. The display will then read: Waiting for MIDI Start/Continue.
PLEASE NOTE: a) The sequence recorded by the DataDisk MUST be recorded with MIDI clock in order to use the external sync feature. If the file does not contain MIDI clock, then all file data will be sent with the first MIDI CLOCK received. b) DataDisk will assume that the start of the MIDI Sequence file is the start of the song, as far as Start, Continue, and Song Position Pointer commands are concerned. For example, if the sequence was recorded in the DataDisk starting at bar 2, beat 1, then that point becomes the beginning of the sequence as far as DataDisk is concerned. When the file is played back from the DataDisk (synced to MIDI Clock), a Start command will start playing from the beginning of the file, which will be 1 bar ahead of the original sequence's start location. Continue and Song Position Pointer commands will be 1 bar ahead of the original sequence's location as well. c) Since a Continue command may occur anywhere within a MIDI Sequence File, there may be a slight delay while the DataDisk searches 62
through the disk for the specified location before executing the command. The DataDisk will, however, remain in sync. d) If, while syncing to an external sequencer, the DataDisk is connected to the sequencer (such as an MMT-8) in a MIDI loop (that is, sequencer MIDI output to DataDisk MIDI input and DataDisk MIDI output to Sequencer MIDI input as in figures 2A and 4 of the DataDisk user's manual), then either the MIDI Clock must be filtered from the DataDisk's output, or the sequencer should be set to not receive MIDI Clock. This is done to make sure that the speed of the sequence playback remains constant, and is accomplished in the following manner: 1) Press the MIDI button four times. The display will then read: MIDI CLOCK OUT FILTER: OFF

Press the "up" SCROLL button. The display will read:
a) Place the MMT-8 into MIDI & INTERNAL b) The MMT-8's countdown should be set to 00, and length should be changed either to the highest number available or the known length of the sequence. c) The DataDisk's EXT MIDI SYNC and MIDI Clock Out filter should both be set to OFF 2) Select the MMT-8 track that you wish to record on. Press Record on the MMT-8 3) Enable record without pressing the PLAY button on the MMT-8 (a MIDI Start command at the beginning of the sequence file sent to the MMT-8 will place the MMT-8 into record mode) 4) Press the DataDisk's Send button and use the scroll buttons to select the file that you wish to send 5) Press the DataDisk's Do/Yes button 6) When the DataDisk has finished sending the file, press the Stop button on the MMT-8 to stop recording. 7) Press Edit while in the part that you have just recorded to on the MMT-8, then scroll through the sequence to determine the total number of beats. Change the length of the sequence to equal the number of beats. This will eliminate any empty beats at the end of the sequence. Synchronizing the DataDisk to a Sequencer In a closed loop configuration (see page 13, fig. 4 of the DataDisk User's Guide), to prevent timing errors caused by MIDI clock returning to the sequencer, you must either: 1) Set the sequencer's clock source to INTERNAL ONLY (ignore incoming MIDI clock), or 2) Set the DataDisk's MIDI clock filter to ON. NOTE: In either case MIDI echo on the DataDisk should be set to OFF.
1) Press the MIDI button. The display will read: MIDI ECHO OFF 2) After setting the DataDisk MIDI parameters as desired (see page 35 of the DataDisk user's manual), press the DO/YES button while on any MIDI page to store any MIDI parameters to disk. The display will temporarily read: MIDI Parameters Stored The display will then return to the current MIDI page. PLEASE NOTE: a) If no MIDI setup is stored on the inserted disk, the current MIDI parameter settings in the DataDisk will not be altered. b) If the DataDisk is powered-on with a disk that has no MIDI setup stored on it, all MIDI parameters will default to OFF.

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1.2D Hook Up External Triggers (rear panel)
The D4s drum sounds can be triggered by non-MIDI electronic drum pads, audio signals from tape, drum sounds from other drum machines, etc.
1. If youre using a hi hat pad, connect its output to rear panel trigger input 1. 2. Connect up to 11 more pads to any of the remaining 11 rear panel trigger inputs.
1.2E Hook Up Power (rear panel)
1. Locate the AC adapter and check that the AC adapters INPUT spec (printed on the adapter label) uses the correct voltage for your part of the planet. 2. Insert the AC adapters smaller plug into the 9V AC Power jack on the D4s rear panel, and plug the AC adapter itself into a source of AC power. Use only the AC adapter supplied with the D4; use of any other AC adapter will void your warranty.
Note: To prolong the AC adapters life, unplug it when not in use (turning the D4s power switch to off is not sufficient to disconnect the AC adapter from AC power). Alesis recommends plugging your AC-powered devices into a switched barrier strip, so that turning off the barrier strip turns off power to your gear.

1.2F Turn On Power

1. Turn on the D4s front panel On/Off switch by pushing on it, then turn on your monitoring system. The D4s LCD should light to indicate that power is being received.
Caution: It is always good practice to keep your monitoring systems level all the way down until all units feeding it have been turned on. Although the D4 doesnt make noise on power-up or power-down, other units may not operate in an equally polite manner.
2. Turn up the D4s front panel volume control about halfway. Turn up the monitoring systems volume control to a low level to prevent blasting your amp and speakers. After the D4 starts making sounds, adjust the monitoring system levels for a comfortable listening level.

1.2G Select Drum Sets

1. After turning on power, the LCD will show a sign-on message. If the LCD does not light, check your power connections. 2. Press the Drum Set button; its LED will light. The LCD will show a Drum Set number on the upper line and the Drum Sets name on the lower line (similar to the example below).
DRUMSET 00 Standard Stuff
3. Trigger D4 notes via MIDI or acoustic triggers. Different MIDI notes (within the range of 36-96) or triggers should trigger different drum sounds. 4. Turn the Data wheel clockwise to select higher-numbered drum kits or counterclockwise to select lower-numbered drum kits. Each click calls up a Drum Set. You cannot select a Drum Set number lower than 00 or higher than 20.

NOTE: It is important to note that your MIDI controller (keyboard or drum pad controller) must have its MIDI note numbers assigned to the corresponding set of note numbers which you have selected for the D4. You now know how to select Drum Sets, Banks, and individual sounds, as well as how to assign sounds to MIDI notes. However, there is much more to the D4. The next part describes all of the D4s editing features in detail. Please read the entire manual at some point to understand the D4s many capabilities.
1.3 BASICS AND DEFINITIONS

1.3A The Voice

Each time the D4 receives a MIDI or acoustic trigger, it plays a voice. A voice is a sound-generating element with several variable parameters: Drum sound, tuning, volume, output assignment (the voices audio output can go to either one of two sets of stereo outputs), panning (the voices audio output can be positioned at any of the seven positions available within the stereo field of the chosen set of outputs), and MIDI note number. Each voice is velocity-sensitive: the harder you hit a drum pad (or the Preview button) or the higher the velocity value of the MIDI trigger, the louder the drum sound assigned to the pad will play. Thanks to the Dynamic Articulation techniques mentioned earlier, the timbre (tonal content) and pitch will often change as well, just like real drums.
1.3B About the Edit Buffer
Whenever you select a Drum Set, all parameters associated with the Drum Set load into a temporary memory buffer. As you edit the Drum Set, changes are made to this temporary version rather than the original Drum Set. This is important for two reasons: If you dont like the results of your edit, you can always revert to the original Drum Set. If you do like the results of your edit, you must save the buffers contents. It can overwrite the original Drum Set data, or be written to a different Drum Set.
If you select another Drum Set, the data in the edit buffer will be overwritten with the newly-selected Drum Sets parameters.

1.3C About Defaults

A default is a setting that is automatically assumed until you purposely change it. Example: When you turn on a VCR, it automatically defaults to Stopyou have to purposely tell the machine to go into Record or Play. Stop is therefore the VCRs power-up default status. The D4 includes several default settings. Example: If you want to save a Drum Set, the D4 will default to saving it to its existing memory slot. However, if desired you can save to another location in memory. Defaults save time by giving you a setup thats instantly ready to go; sometimes youll need to change only a few parameters to modify the default setup to your liking. Often the default is whatever was selected last. Example: If the D4 was set to Drum Set 14 just before you shut off power, upon power-up the D4 will return to Drum Set 14.

1.3D MIDI Note Range

The D4s sounds can be assigned to any note within a 5-octave (61 note) range, from MIDI note 36 to 96. However, this range may be shifted using the Root Note feature (section 4.1). For example, the bottom root note could be shifted to MIDI note 0, in which case the highest note would be five octaves above that, or MIDI note 60. Shifting the root note to the highest possible value, 67, means that the highest note will end up on MIDI note 127.

3.1 VOICE

Press Voice, and the LCD shows the selected MIDI note number on the top line and two parameters, drum Bank and Drum Sound, on the bottom line. Example: NOTE: 054 F#2 Kik/01: Big "O" To select a drum Bank, place the cursor under the drum Bank name and turn the Data wheel. Bank options are:
To select a drum sound within the Bank, place the cursor under the drum sound and turn the Data wheel. The accompanying chart included with the D4 shows the names of all available drum sounds.

3.2 TUNE

Press Tune, and the LCD shows the selected MIDI note number on the top line and the Pitch on the bottom line. Example: NOTE: 054 F#2 PITCH: +0.00 To change the pitch one semitone at a time, place the cursor under the units (leftmost) digit and turn the Data wheel. To change the pitch one cent at a time, place the cursor under the tens (middle) digit and turn the Data wheel. The range is from +3.00 (most sharp) to 0 (normal pitch) to -4.00 (most flat).

3.3 MIX

Press Mix, and the LCD shows the selected MIDI note number on the top line and two parameters, Volume and Pan, on the bottom line. Example: NOTE: 054 F#2 VOL: 90 PAN <> To change the Volume, place the cursor under the Vol value and turn the Data wheel. Values are variable from 00 to 99. The D4 has two pairs of stereo outputs. Drum sounds can be assigned to either pair of outputs as described in section 3.4, and placed anywhere within the stereo field of the assigned outputs via the pan function. To change a drums panning (position in the stereo field), place the cursor under the Pan value and turn the Data wheel. The seven available pan positions correspond to the number shown in parentheses: hard left (1), soft left (2), left of center (3), center (4), right of center (5), soft right (6), and hard right (7). Note: When heard from the drummers perspective, the high-hat will usually be on the left, snare and kick in the center, and toms trailing from left-center to right. Of course, one of the advantages of electronic drum sets is that you need not follow any standard way of placing drum sounds in the stereo field.

2. Turn the Data wheel to select the desired Drum Set root note.
4.1 MIDI CHANNEL SELECTION
The D4 can receive and transmit MIDI data in Omni mode (receives data appearing on any of the 16 MIDI channels, transmits data over channel 1) or Poly mode (transmits and receives over any one of the 16 MIDI channels). Use Omni when playing the D4 from an external MIDI controller (MIDI drum pads, MIDI keyboard, etc.) since its not necessary to match channels. When several instruments are being driven by MIDI (e.g., when a sequencer sends out data over several channels to different instruments), use Poly mode so that the D4 tunes in to only the channel containing drum data.
1. The top line of the second page shows the channel status. Example:

CHANNEL: OMNI THRU: OFF

2. Make sure the cursor is set under the channel status. 3. Turn the Data wheel to select Omni or one of the 16 channels (selecting a single channel automatically puts the D4 in Poly mode).
4.2 MIDI THRU/OUT SELECTION
When on, this function passes data appearing at the MIDI In to the MIDI Out/Thru jack as well as to the D4s internal circuitry. This input data is merged with any data being generated by the D4. Example: If the D4 is being used for trigger-to-MIDI conversion and Thru is on, the notes generated by the triggers will be merged with the data appearing at the MIDI In jack. When off, the MIDI Out/Thru jack serves as a MIDI Out only from the D4. Input data present at the D4s MIDI In is not passed through.
1. The bottom line of the second page shows the Thru status. Example:
2. Place the cursor under the Thru status. 3. Turn the Data wheel to select Off (Out/Thru acts as a MIDI Out jack) or On (Out/Thru acts as a MIDI Thru jack).
4.3 PROGRAM CHANGE ENABLE
Program Change commands can change Drum Sets at any time, including while the D4 is playing. A Program Change Table (section 4.5) determines which Drum Set will be called up in response to a particular Program Change number. The default is Program Changes 00-20 call up Drum Sets 00-20; so do Program Changes 21-41, 42-62, 63-83, 84-104, and 105 to 125. 126 calls up Drum Set 00, and 127 calls up Drum Set 01. Caution: Some MIDI devices number Program Changes as 1-128, others as 0-127, and some as banks of programs. Use the Program Change Table to compensate for these differences.
1. The top line of the third page shows the Program Change status. Example:
PROG CHANGE: ON CONTROLLERS: ON
2. Make sure the cursor is under the Program Change status. 3. Use the Data wheel to select a status of On (the D4 selects Drum Sets when it receives Program Change commands) or Off (the D4 ignores Program Change commands). Note that even with status set to On, you can still select Drum Sets manually at any time.

After the transfer is complete, the D4s LCD reverts to the Sysex Backup page. Note: The MIDI Thru function is disabled while Sys Ex is being transmitted.

4.6A Save to DataDisk

Heres an example of how to save D4 MIDI data to the Alesis DataDisk.
1. Connect the D4 MIDI Out to the DataDisk (DD) MIDI In. 2. Insert a formatted disk into the DD. If the disk is not formatted, insert it in the drive and press the DD Format switch. When the DD display says FORMAT DISK?, press DO/YES. When the display says ARE YOU SURE? press DO/YES again. 3. Press the DD Receive button. The display says RECV ONE SYSEX: WAITING FOR DATA. 4. Press the D4 MIDI button (if you are not already in the MIDI function) and select the Sysex Backup page. 5. Select the type of data to be saved (System, Edit Buffer, Trigger Setup, Program Table).
6. Press the D4 Store button. The D4 display says SENDING SYSEX DATA OUT MIDI and the DD display says RECEIVING Alesis D4 to indicate that data has been received. 7. To prevent future confusion, name the DD file using the DD NAME function.
4.7 RECEIVE DATA FROM ANOTHER MIDI DEVICE
The D4 will automatically load D4 system exclusive data present at its MIDI In. Therefore, there is no associated function since reception can occur at any time that a sys ex storage device or another D4 sends data through its MIDI Out into the D4s MIDI In. The D4 is compatible only with D4 system exclusive data; for example, you cannot load system exclusive data from another drum device into the D4. The following describes how to load data from the Alesis DataDisk; other system exclusive storage devices work similarly, but please refer to the owners manual for your particular device to find out how to set it up to send MIDI sys ex data. Note: When loading the Edit Buffer via sys ex, be sure and save the Drum Set before changing to another Drum Set. Otherwise, the data will be lost.

4.7A Load from DataDisk

1. Connect the DD MIDI Out to the D4 MIDI In 2. Insert the disk into the DD that contains the file to be loaded into the D4. 3. Press the DD SEND button. The display says SEND FILE Alesis D4 (filename)? 4. Press the DD DO/YES button. The D4 automatically senses the presence of this data; no button-pushing is required. The DD display says SENDING: Alesis D4 (filename), the D4 display says RECEIVING SYSEX DATA FROM MIDI. Note that loading sys ex data overwrites the resident memory. 5. The D4 will revert to whatever screen was showing prior to receiving MIDI data.

CHAPTER 5: EXTERNAL TRIGGERING
External triggering has three main uses: Driving D4 sounds from electronic drum pads. Some electronic drum pads provide MIDI triggers when hit; these can feed directly into the D4s MIDI input. Other pads generate analog triggers, which can interface with the trigger inputs. Using contact transducers (triggers) mounted on acoustic drums to trigger sounds from the D4. These transducers can be plugged directly into the D4 trigger input, which will convert the trigger's signal to MIDI information. Drum substitution. If the drum sounds on a tape are poorly recorded, and the sounds to be substituted are on different tracks (or sufficiently far apart in pitch that equalization can help separate the sounds), these drum sounds can trigger the high-fidelity drum sounds inside the D4.
All of these applications present certain challenges. With electronic drum pads, crosstalk from one drum hit can leak into another drum pad and trigger it accidentally. Acoustic drum pickups are much more finicky than electronic pads. They are subject to extraneous noise pickup, varying gain, and system noise, all of which make reliable triggering difficult. The D4 includes five editable parameters that let you electronically tailor the D4 trigger inputs to the characteristics of your drum transducers. It may take considerable experimentation to achieve reliable triggeringthen again, it may not. At some point, youll hit on the right combination of transducer placement and D4 parameter values necessary for proper triggering. The external trigger function contains six pages of parameters. When you first press the Ext Trig button, it calls up the first page. Pressing the Ext Trig button again calls the second page, a third time calls the third page, and so on. You can also use the cursor buttons to go from one page to another by cursoring past the parameters on the current screen. For more details, see sections 1.4B and 1.4C. In the rest of this section, well assume you know how to select the appropriate page.

About Trigger Parameters

The D4 now offers five user controllable trigger parameters. These are:

This chart represents three signals which are "seen" by the D4. Signal 1 is a legitimate hit from the snare pad. Signal 2 is the Tom 1 pad, but it is not a hit. It is the pad being triggered by stand vibrations from the first snare hit. Signal 3 is a second "real" hit from the snare pad. As you can see the XTALK threshold is set at a value of 30 (represented by the dotted line). The two snare hits (signals 1 and 3) both register well above the XTALK threshold. However, the tom (signal 2) registers too soft (at 20), and is correctly ignored by the D4. If the XTALK level had been set at an improper value (in this case lower than 20), signal 2 would exceed the XTALK threshold, and the D4 would have triggered the sound. This illustrates how proper adjustment of the XTALK parameter will result in the elimination of this "interaction" between the pads.
DCAY. This parameter represents the signal decay time, or the amount of time between once a pad has been struck and triggers, to when it will trigger again from another hit. This is one of the more tricky issues of triggering. Here's why:
When hits are spaced 2 or more seconds apart, the first signal has plenty of time to decay completely, making it easy to determine the second signal as an actual hit. However, when playing quick, repetitive hits it is much more difficult to determine where one hit ends and the next one begins. To further complicate things, some drum sounds (especially acoustic drums) take a long time to decay. During this period, part of the decay can be interpreted as another closely-spaced hit. This is where the DCAY control comes in. The DCAY control adjusts the time and threshold of the signal decay making it possible for the D4 to correctly determine whether closely spaced signals are "real" hits or just decay.
Selecting a higher DCAY value (long decay times) will allow for the most reliable triggering but may miss quickly repeated hits. Lower DCAY values (shorter times) will respond to quickly repeated hits but may be more prone to false triggering. Experimentation with these levels is necessary to achieve the proper results. Example:
This chart simulates the waveform of a snare drum hit. The first big point in the signal is the actual hit, the rest of the waveform is all decay. Since the DCAY time threshold is adjusted too low, the DCAY level curves off too soon allowing a second point, during the signal's decay, to exceed the threshold. Once this happens the D4 will trigger the sound.

Each trigger can be assigned to any MIDI note number, which is associated with a corresponding drum sound (programmed according to the instructions in section 3.0). Trigger note assignments are recalled as part of a Drum Set whenever a new set is selected.
1. The first Ext Trig page shows three parameters. Example:
TRIG:02 VCURVE:4 NOTE: 036 C1
2. Place the cursor under the Note parameter. 3. Turn the Data wheel to select the note that will be assigned to the selected trigger input.
5.2 TRIGGER VELOCITY SELECTION
The velocity sensitivity of each trigger input can be adjusted to accompany a wide variety of playing styles, and to help compensate for sensitivity variances between various brands of drum pads and transducers. For example, a hard hitting player might have a difficult time in playing the softer velocity sounds available in the D4 due to the high impact of most of his hits. Using a lower VCURVE setting (1 - 3) would require a much harder strike to generate a full MIDI velocity of 127, and make it much easier to obtain the more "subtle" velocity sounds when playing the drum pad. When using a higher VCURVE setting (5 - 7) the opposite applies, or a much softer hit would generate a MIDI velocity of 127.
1. While in the first Ext Trig page, place the cursor under the VCURVE parameter. Example:
2. Turn the Data wheel to select the sensitivity value desired to suite the style of play, or the pads being used. The default setting of 4 is the "median" velocity curve. For average play (hits ranging from very soft to very hard) this curve gives you the full range of sensitivity which corresponds to MIDI velocities 1 through 127.
Note: The setting of 0, Unassigned, is selected by rotating the Data wheel fully counterclockwise. This is a special case VCURVE setting which allows a trigger input to contribute to the D4s master suppression threshold. However, it will not trigger any sounds or MIDI note messages. In certain circumstances this setting can help suppress false triggering on the other inputs. Example: Suppose three drum pads are mounted on a single drum stand while set up on a noisy stage. Normally, a higher XTALK setting would be used to eliminate interaction between the pads, and a high NOISE floor setting would be selected to reject the high level of ambient noise and vibration. In certain cases with crosstalk and noise floor settings too high, softer hits might become rejected because the D4 assumes that they are noise. Instead of compromising between the two parameters, there are two methods which can improve this scenario.

Method One: 1. First, attach an inexpensive contact transducer to the center of the drum stand and plug it into a D4 input. 2. Next, go to the VCURVE page under the EXT TRIG function and select the VCURVE setting of 0 (Unassigned) for this trigger. 3. Go to the next page and set the XTALK, DCAY and the NOISE levels all to 00. This low level will allow the maximum amount of noise and stand vibrations to be detected by the D4. 4. Press the EXT TRIG button again to get to the GAIN page showing the bar graph meter display. Using the meter, adjust the level to select a "hotter" than usual GAIN setting. Since in this case the gain is effected only by the the stand vibrations, a very strong signal is needed to maximize the trigger's performance. 5. Now as the stage vibrates, or when other signals trigger the drum stand transducer, the suppression function will note this signal and determine that any softer signals coming from the other three pads must be crosstalk. Also, if the suppression function sees a soft signal from the three main pads but little or no signal from the drum stand transducer, it will assume that the pad signals are valid hits and trigger the D4 sounds. Method Two:
In severe cases, this is another way in which the Unassigned feature can be used. For this scenario lets use the bass as the reason the surrounding noise level is making proper triggering difficult. Each time the bass player "pops" a string, the vibration triggers the tom 1 pad.
1. First, take a direct out from the bass amplifier, and plug it into an unused trigger input on the D4. 2. Next, go to the VCURVE page under the EXT TRIG function and select the VCURVE setting of 0 (Unassigned) for this trigger.
3. Go to the next page and set the XTALK, DCAY and NOISE levels all to 00. This low level will allow the maximum signal to be detected by the D4. 4. Press the EXT TRIG button again to get to the GAIN page. Using the bar graph meter, adjust the level according to the severety of the false triggering. If notes are constantly triggering, use a high gain. If only occasional, select a lower level.
Note: The peak level indicator (a period) explained in section 5.7 will not appear next to the value when in the Unassigned mode.
5. Now when the D4 receives a signal (from the tom 1 pad) which was generated by the string pop from the bass, not only will it compare this signal to the other drum pads, it will also compare it to the bass. In essence, the D4 isolates the bass from the noise floor and "thinks" the bass is a another drum pad. It will now treat it the same as any other pad and "filter" out the unwanted signals.

5.5 TRIGGER DCAY CONTROL SELECTION
If a pad or drum "double triggers" when it is struck, it may be necessary to adjust the DCAY level. This is evident when shortly after the initial strike to a pad, a second trigger from the same pad is generated, or it "double triggers". Note: With certain pads it may not be necessary to adjust this parameter. In that case, skip this section and go on to 5.6 Noise Control Selection).
1. After selecting the desired Trigger whose decay level needs to be set, place the cursor under the DCAY parameter. Example:
2. Turn the Data wheel to select the desired level of decay suppression necessary to stop the pad from double triggering. (00 is minimum, 99 maximum) This level will depend on your current set up, including the mounting configurations and the type of pads used.
When triggering from acoustic drums, the factors involved are staggering. Not only do the type and size of drum make a big difference, but things such as; if the drum is single or double headed, the tension of the head(s), the muffling, and the trigger placement all play very important roles in getting good results and proper "tracking" of your play. For more detailed tips and suggestions in these areas please refer to Tips On External Triggering From Acoustic Drums, included in the D4 literature package.
5.6 TRIGGER NOISE LEVEL SELECTION
When in a high noise floor level situation such as playing live on a stage with bass cabinets nearby, it may be necessary to adjust the NOISE parameter level. If your situation does not necessitate the need to make these type of adjustments, skip this section and go on to 5.7 Trigger Gain Selection.
1. After selecting the desired Trigger whose noise level needs to be set, place the cursor under the NOISE parameter. Example:
2. Turn the Data wheel to select the desired level of suppression necessary to stop the pad from false triggering. (00 is minimum, 99 maximum) Stage noise and rumble, the stability of drum risers and platforms, volume, and crowd vibrations are all factors in choosing the proper level.
Remember: In keeping potential problems to a minimum, it is always a good idea to try to keep some distance between your pad or drum kit, and nearby speaker cabinets (especially bass cabinets). Whenever possible, try to aim them so they are not facing directly towards your set up. Also, avoid unsteady drum risers and hardware.
5.7 TRIGGER GAIN SELECTION
To compensate for differences in transducer outputs, the gain for each trigger can be set independently.

To replicate these individual effects:
1. Patch a drum pad (the hi hat striking surface) into D4 Trigger input 1 and a footswitch (for opening and closing the hi hat) into the footswitch input. Hi Hat Pedal must be selected for the footswitch mode. 2. If it isn't assigned already, assign an open hi hat sound to the note triggered by Trigger Input 1. 3. Press the EXTERNAL TRIG button until the display shows the Footswitch Closing note. This is the note that will be played when the footswitch is pressed. If it hasn't been assigned already, assign a closing hi hat sound to this note. This will give the hi hat a realistic closing sound, as opposed to an abrupt switch from an open sound to a closed sound.
Note that you don't necessarily have to use hi hat sounds while using this mode. If you wish, you can use any sound available in the D4.
4. Press the EXTERNAL TRIG button until the display shows the Footswitch Held note. This is the note that will be played when Trigger 1 is struck AND the footswitch is held. If it hasn't been assigned already, assign a closed hi hat sound to this note. 5. Using the Group function (section 3.7), assign all the hi hat sounds to Group 1 so that you cant have two different hi hat sounds ringing at the same time. (The hi hat sounds could be assigned to Group 2 if youre already using Group 1 for other drum sounds.)
If you strike the hi hat pad while the footswitch is not pressed, youll hear the open hi hat sound. Pressing the footswitch triggers the foot closed sound (at the same velocity as the most recent open hi hat hit); just like a real hi hat, you dont have to strike the padsimply closing the hi hat by pressing the footswitch triggers the sound.
Striking the pad while the footswitch is held down plays the closed hi hat sound.
CHAPTER 6: MIDI SUPPLEMENT
(This chapter is an abridged version of material from Power Sequencing with Master Tracks Pro/Pro 4 and The Complete Guide to the Alesis HR-16 and MMT-8, copyright 1990 and 1989 respectively by AMSCO Publications, and is adapted with permission.)

6.0 MIDI BASICS

Most current electronic instruments and signal processors, including the D4, contain an internal computer. Computers and music have been working together for decades, which is not surprising considering musics mathematical basis (consider frequencies, harmonics, vibrato rates, tunings, etc.). In the mid-70s, microcomputers became inexpensive enough to be built into consumer-priced musical instruments. They were used for everything from sound generation to storing parameters in memory for later recall. In 1983, the MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) specification was introduced to better exploit the computers inside these new musical instruments, primarily to insure compatibility with equipment from other manufacturers. MIDI expresses musical events (notes played, vibrato, dynamics, tempo, etc.) as a common language consisting of standardized digital data. This data can be understood by MIDI-compatible computers and computer-based musical instruments. Before electronics, music was expressed exclusively as written symbols. By translating musical parameters into digital data, MIDI can express not only the types of musical events written into sheet music, but other parameters as well (such as amount of pitch bend or degree of vibrato).

126 127

Omni Off (0) Omni On (0) Mono On (0-16; 0=Omni Off) Poly On (0)

6.3B Mode Messages

There are two messages that determine the MIDI mode (i.e., how the D4 will receive MIDI data). The Omni message determines how many channels will be recognized. Omni On means that data from all channels will be received; Omni Off limits the number of channels, usually to one. The Mono/Poly message deals with voice assignment within the synthesizer. In Mono mode, only one note at a time plays in response to voice messages; in Poly mode, as many voices can play notes as are available to play notes. The D4 implements two different MIDI modes.
Omni On/Poly (Mode 1) The D4 responds to MIDI data occuring on any channel. Omni Off/Poly (Mode 3) The D4 is tuned to a single MIDI channel, from 1 to 16.
6.4 SYSTEM COMMON MESSAGES
Intended for all units in a system, some of these messages are:
Song Position Pointer This indicates how many MIDI beats (normally a 16th note) have elapsed since a piece started (up to 16,384 total beats). It is primarily used to allow different sequencers and drum machines to auto-locate to each other so that if you start one sequencer, the other device will automatically jump to the same place in the song, whereupon both continue on together. System Exclusive This message (called sys ex for short) is considered exclusive because different manufacturers send and receive data over MIDI which is intended only for that manufacturers equipment. Example: Sending a D4 message to an Ensoniq SD-1 wont do anything but the message will be understood by other D4s. This data often contains information about individual instrument programs. Timing Clock A master tempo source (such as a sequencer) emits 24 timing messages (clocks) per quarter note. Each device synchronized to the sequencer advances by 1/24th of a quarter note when it receives the clock message, thus keeping units in sync after theyve both started at the same time. Many devices subdivide this clock signal internally for higher resolution (e.g., 96 pulses per quarter note). Start Signals all rhythmically-based units when to start playing. Stop Signals all rhythmically-based units when to stop playing.
Continue Unlike a Start command, which re-starts a sequencer or drum machine from the beginning of a song each time it occurs, sending a continue message after stop will re-start units from where they were stopped.

 

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