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Alesis Midiverb 4

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Alesis Midiverb 4Alesis MidiVerb 4 - Digital Reverb and Multi-Effects Processor
The MidiVerb 4 is the perfect effects processor for professional project studios and musicians who require an affordable solution for fully-programmable, high-fidelity effects. Its excellent effects algorithms produce dense, natural reverb, rich chorus, flange, delay, pitch effects and up to three simultaneous multieffects. The MidiVerb 4 offers 18 bit A/D and D/A converters and 24 bit internal processing for a 20Hz-20kHz bandwidth and 90dB dynamic range, making it ideal for digital recording. P... Read more

Details
Brand: ALESIS
Part Numbers: MD4X110, MIDIVERB 4, MIDIVERB-4, MIDIVERB4, MidiVerb 4, MidiVerb4, SKU72200
UPC: 0694318001639, 694318001639

 

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HOT FOR GIGGING This is the one for you whether on a budget or not. Great for gigging. Professional sound.

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ALESIS MidiVerb 4

Reference Manual

Introduction

Thank you for purchasing the Alesis MidiVerb 4 Multi Effects Processor. To take full advantage of the MidiVerb 4s functions, and to enjoy long and trouble-free use, please read this users manual carefully.

How To Use This Manual

This manual is divided into the following sections describing the various modes of the MidiVerb 4. Though we recommend you take time to read through the entire manual once carefully, those having general knowledge about effects devices should use the table of contents to reference specific functions. Chapter 1: Your First Session with the MidiVerb 4. A basic introduction to getting the unit up and running, auditioning the factory Programs, adjusting levels, comparing and storing edited Programs. Chapter 2: Connections. Deals with the necessary preparation before using, including connections to other components, such as instruments, mixing consoles, patchbays, and multitrack recorders. Chapter 3: Overview of Effects. A detailed look at the signal processing capabilities of the MidiVerb 4 and the concept of multi-effect programming. Chapter 4: Editing Programs. A guided tour for programming typical single and multi-effect applications. Chapter 5: Description of Controls. A dictionary of all buttons, connectors, and parameters. Use this chapter as a quick reference guide when searching for specific information. Chapter 6: MIDI Applications. This chapter discusses the various MIDI functions, such as recalling Programs, realtime modulation of parameters, and Sysex data transfer. Chapter 7: Trouble-Shooting. Contains the Trouble-shooting Index, maintenance and service information, and MIDI implementation chart. Appendices. MIDI basics, trouble-shooting, maintenance and service information, MIDI Implementation Chart and an Index.

Conventions

The buttons, knobs, and rear panel connectors are referred to in this manual just as their names appear on the MidiVerb 4, using all capital letters and in brackets (Example: [PROG] button, [VALUE] Knob, etc.). When text in the MidiVerb 4s display is quoted, it is indicated using special typeface (Example: 00 to127, DELAY}REVERB, etc.).
When something important appears in the manual, an icon (like the one on the left) will appear in the left margin. This symbol indicates that this information is vital when operating the MidiVerb 4.
MidiVerb 4 Reference Manual

Contents

CONTENTS
Your First Session with the MidiVerb 4.. 7
Unpacking and Inspection....7 Basic Connections....7 Powering Up....8 Setting Levels....8 Automatic Input Level Settings...8 Whats in the Display?....9 Auditioning Internal Programs...10 Switching Between Preset and User Banks..10 Bypass Program/Preset 00...10 Changing Effect Settings....11 Using Online Help...12 Adjusting Effects Mix Levels...13 Dry Defeat....13 Comparing an Edited Program to its Original Settings...14 Restoring an Edited Program to its Original Settings..14 Storing Edited Programs....15 Bypassing Effects....16

Connections... 17

AC Power Hookup....17 Line Conditioners and Protectors...17 Audio Connections....17 Typical Applications...18 Input Jack Wiring....18 Interfacing Directly with Instruments...19
Using the Aux Sends...20 Using Inserts...22 Using Main Outputs...23
Avoiding Ground Loops....24 MIDI.....25 Footswitch....25
Overview of Effects... 27
The Architecture of the MidiVerb 4...27 What is a Configuration?....27 Single....27 Double...28 Dual Mono....28 Multi Chain...29 Reverb Effects....30 Concert Hall....30 Real Room...30 Realroom & Room...30 Ambience....30 Plate Reverb....30 Nonlinear....30 Reverb Parameters...31 Decay....31
Low Pass Filter...31 Pre-delay....31 Pre-delay Mix...31 Density....31 Diffusion....31 Frequency Damping Low & High..32 Reverberation Swirl...32 Gating....32 Delay Effects....33 Mono Delay....33 Stereo Delay....33 Ping Pong Delay....33 MultiTap Delay...33 BPM Mono Delay....33
Synchronizing to MIDI Clock..34
Delay & DLY....34 Setting Delay Time Using Tap Tempo...34 Pitch Effects...35 Stereo Chorus...35 Quad Chorus....35 Chorus...35 Stereo Flange....36 Flange....37 Lezlie....37 Stereo Pitch Shifter...37 Pitch....37 Auto Pan....37

Editing Programs... 39

Selecting A Configuration....39 Editing Effect Parameters...40 Moving Through Pages...41 Using the A/B/C/D Buttons...41 Using Online Help...41 Special Cases....41 Naming A Program...42
Description of Controls... 43
Front Panel....43 LCD Display....43 BYPASS LED Indicator...44 VALUE Knob...44 PROGram Button...45 EDIT/PAGE Button...45 A/B/C/D (NAME/ESC/</>) Buttons...45 UTILity Button...45 STORE Button....47 INPUT and OUTPUT Buttons...48 Auto Level....48 POWER Switch...48 Rear Panel....49 Power....49 Bypass/Advance Footswitch...49 MIDI In....49

Auditioning Internal Programs
The MidiVerb 4 comes with 128 Programs in a Preset bank, plus another 128 Programs in the User bank. These Programs represent the wide range of applications for which the MidiVerb 4 is suited. To audition the internal effect Programs:

Press the [PROG] button.

The [PROG] button will light.
Turn the [VALUE] knob to scroll through the 128 Preset Programs and 128 User

Programs.

Switching Between Preset and User Banks
To instantly switch between the Preset and User banks, press the [PROG] button. Each time you press the [PROG] button, the MidiVerb 4 will toggle back and forth between the Preset and User banks. The display will indicate this by reading either PRESET or USER next to the Program number. You can also switch between banks when scrolling through the Programs with the [VALUE] knob. When you scroll clockwise past Preset 127, the display will rollover to User 00. Likewise, if you turn back the [VALUE] knob counterclockwise past User 00, the display will move to Preset 127. However, if you turn back the [VALUE] knob counterclockwise past Preset 00, the display will not wrap around back to User 127 but instead will remain at Preset 00. This is because Preset 00 is setup as a Bypass Program (see below). So, if you are looking for the Bypass Program, you can scroll the [VALUE] knob counterclockwise without worrying about passing it, since the display will automatically stop when it reaches Preset 00.

Bypass Program/Preset 00

Preset 00 is setup as a Bypass Program, meaning that the dry, uneffected signal being sent to the MidiVerb 4s input(s) is passing through and none of the effects output can be heard. Use this Program whenever you want to only hear the direct signal of the MidiVerb 4s inputs routed to its outputs for reference purposes. This is not to be confused with Bypass mode, explained later in this chapter. You can select Preset 00 not only from the front panel using the [VALUE] knob, but also by using a footswitch connected to the [FOOTSWITCH] jack (if the [FOOTSWITCH] is set to the Advance function), or by sending a MIDI program change message from a device connected to the [MIDI IN]connector. For more information about the [FOOTSWITCH] jack and [MIDI IN] connector, see Chapter 2. For more information about MIDI program change messages, see Chapter 6.

Changing Effect Settings

When you dial up a Program, its Configuration is shown in the display to the right of the Programs name.

RoomVerb

REAL ROOM
The Configuration will either be a single reverb type effect (as in the example above), or a combination of two or three effects (like Reverb+Delay, or Chorus>Delay> Reverb). Once you have identified what effects are used in the Programs Configuration, you can then find the effect parameters more easily. To edit a Programs effect settings, you must first enter Edit mode. This is done by pressing either the [PAGE] button or any one of the [A], [B], [C] or [D] buttons, as long as the [PROG] button is lit (Note: Pressing these buttons in other modes performs different functions). Once in Edit mode, the display will look something like this:

Press [UTIL].

The [UTIL] button will light.
Press [EDIT] until page 1 is selected.

The display will read:

Footswitch Dry Defeat Press [D] to toggle the Dry Defeat parameter ON or OFF.
When Dry Defeat is enabled, the Mix parameter of each effect (described above) will read - - - to indicate it cannot be edited (it is fixed at 100%). Exception: The RealRoom->Flange Configuration will have its Reverb Mix parameter disabled (set at 100%), but the Flange effects Mix will still be available for editing.
Comparing an Edited Program to its Original Settings
The left side of the display always indicates the currently selected Program. If the [PROG] button is pressed once, the currently selected Programs name and the Configuration being used both appear in the upper part of the display. Once a Program has been edited, the Configurations name will appear in lower case letters. With multi-effect Configurations (where there is more than one effect being used) and only one effect has been edited, the edited effects name will appear in lower case letters. Example: If using the Configuration DELAY>REVERB and you have edited only the Delays parameters, the display will read delay>REVERB if the [PROG] button is pressed. This indicates that one or more of the Delays parameters have been altered, but the Reverbs parameters have not been changed. By pressing both [PAGE] and [A] simultaneously, you can temporarily access the original version of the Program you are editing that is, the last Program saved to the currently selected location number. This allows you to compare the differences created by changing parameters in the edited Program. While you are in Compare mode, the display will flash COMPARING EDITS. Pressing any button exits Compare mode; the display will return to its original state and the edited version of the Program will be accessed. You can go in and out of Compare mode as often as you like, as long as the display indicates that you have edited the Program in some way (i.e., if the Program hasnt been edited yet, there is nothing to compare it to, right?).
Restoring an Edited Program to its Original Settings
If you decide to abort the changes you have made to an edited Program, this can be done in two easy steps:

Press [PROG].

The display will exit Edit mode.
Turn the [VALUE] knob to select a different Program, then turn it back the
opposite direction to re-select the original Program. This recalls the stored version of the selected Program number, and the Configuration name in the display returns to all upper case letters. Consequently, any changes you had made to the Program before turning the [VALUE] knob would be lost. That is, unless you stored the edited Program into memory first.

Storing Edited Programs

Once you are satisfied with the changes you have made to an edited Program, or are creating a new Program from scratch, you will need to store your edited Program back into memory. The MidiVerb 4 will store the currently selected Program in nonvolatile memory (which is backed-up when the unit is turned off). If you edit a Program, the changes you made will still be there the next time you switch on the unit, even if you hadnt stored the edited Program into memory yet. However, if you select another Program from memory before storing the edited Program, your changes will be lost forever.

Although the MidiVerb 4 has two banks (Preset and User), you can only store Programs in the User bank. To store an edited Program:

Press [STORE].

The [STORE] button will flash, and the display will read:

Store as XXX (nnnnnnnn)?

whereas XXX is a Program location number from 00127 in the User bank, and nnnnnnnn is the Programs name.
Use the [VALUE] knob to select which location (00127) you wish to store the
selected Program into. You can only store Programs into the User bank. If you select a Program from the Preset bank and store it, you will automatically be taken into the User bank.
If desired, change the Programs name by pressing [A/NAME].
This moves the cursor from the location number field to the first character in the Programs name. Turn the [VALUE] knob to scroll through the list of available characters. Use the [C/<] and [D/>] buttons to move the cursors position left and right, respectively. If you need to move the cursor back to the Program number field to select a different location to store to, press [B/ESC]. Note: To abort this operation and thereby not store the edited Program simply press any other button except [STORE].

Press [STORE] again.

The [STORE] buttons LED will momentarily flash quickly, while the display reads:

Program nnnnnnnn Stored!

whereby nnnnnnnn is the Programs name. The [STORE] button will turn off and the display will revert to wherever it was before [STORE] was pressed for the first time.

Bypassing Effects

At any time you can bypass the effects, thereby allowing the direct signal to pass through the MidiVerb 4 unchanged. This can be done in two ways: by simultaneously pressing both the [PROG] and [UTIL] buttons on the front panel; or, by connecting a footswitch to the [FOOTSWITCH] jack and pressing the footswitch. This requires that the [FOOTSWITCH] jack be set to trigger the Bypass function, which is located among the UTILity functions.
Each time the [PROG] and [UTIL] buttons are pressed, or the footswitch connected to the [FOOTSWITCH] jack is pressed, Bypass mode is toggled on and off again. When Bypass mode is turned on, the [BYPASS] LED will be lit. To set the [FOOTSWITCH] jack to the Bypass function:

Mono In, Stereo Out. While still using a mono input, you could connect two mono cords to the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] outputs of the MidiVerb 4 to a stereo amplification system or two mixer inputs.
Dual Mono. Connect two mono cords to the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] inputs of the MidiVerb 4 from two mono sources , and two other mono cords from the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] outputs of the MidiVerb 4 to a stereo amplification system or two mixer inputs. This hookup allows discrete processing of the two channels, since blocks can be dedicated to a single channel. Stereo. Connect two mono cords to the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] INPUTS of the MidiVerb 4 from a stereo source , and two other mono cords from the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] OUTPUTS of the MidiVerb 4 to a stereo amplification system or two mixer inputs.
Chapter 2 Connections Interfacing to a Mixing Console
The MidiVerb 4 handles mono or stereo sends at all system levels. The input circuitry of the MidiVerb 4 can easily handle +4 dBu levels (+20 dBu peaks), while having enough input and output gain to interface with the low -10 dBV signal levels of budget recording systems. The MidiVerb 4 may be connected to a mixing console in several different ways. It can be used to effect several instruments at once by using the auxiliary send and return controls of the mixer. Another method of interfacing is to connect the unit directly to the insert send and return patch points of the channel that is to be effected. Still another way of interfacing the MidiVerb 4 to a mixer or recording console would be in-line across the output of your mixing console. This last setup would be used only if you needed to effect the entire mix.

Using the Aux Sends

Generally, mixing consoles provide two types of auxiliary sends: pre-fader sends for creating a cue (headphone) mix, and individual, post-fader effect sends. Typically, if a mixer has more than two sends per channel (4, 6 or 8, perhaps), the first two sends are reserved for the cue sends, while the remaining sends are used to feed effects, such as the MidiVerb 4. If you are using a mixer with more than two sends, connect the MidiVerb 4 using post-fader sends. Using a mixers aux sends poses a distinct advantage: each channel has its own level control feeding the aux output (and eventually the MidiVerb 4 input). This allows you to make a mix of any channels you want to go to the effects by using the individual channels aux send levels on the mixer. Most consoles also have aux master controls, which set the overall level of each aux output. Coming back from the MidiVerb 4s outputs into the mixer, you have two options: connecting to dedicated return inputs, or connecting to channel inputs.

The former is good if your mixer provides dedicated inputs (called returns) for effect devices like the MidiVerb 4. If your mixer does not have these, or you have already used them all, consider connecting the MidiVerb 4 to channel inputs (if there are any remaining). No matter where you connect the output of the MidiVerb 4 into the mixer, you are in control of the balance between the mixers channel inputs (the uneffected signal being routed to the aux sends and the Mix), and the effect returns coming from the MidiVerb 4. The effect returns generally should only contain affected signal, and not have any uneffected signal mixed with it (since these two signals are blended together at the mixer). Therefore, it may be necessary to modify the mix of each channel in the Program you are using so that only effected signal is present at the MidiVerb 4s outputs. This can be done in two ways: Set each effects Mix parameters to 100% (wet signal only) Turn on the Dry Defeat function.
For more information about Dry Defeat, see Chapter 1 or Chapter 5.
Mono In - Stereo Out. If you only want to feed the MidiVerb 4 a mono input, but wish to connect both of its outputs back to the mixer, you will need three 1/4" audio cables. Connect a mono cord from an effect send to the [LEFT/CH.1] input of the MidiVerb 4, another mono cord from the [LEFT/CH.1] output of the MidiVerb 4 to an effect return or other mixer input, and another mono cord from the [RIGHT/CH.2] output of the MidiVerb 4 to an adjacent effect return or mixer input.
Stereo In - Stereo Out. This connection is similar to the one described above. However, by utilizing two sends from the mixer, we add one more cord and can now send a stereo signal to the MidiVerb 4s inputs. Example, if you connected sends 3 and 4 to the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] inputs, and had a stereo instrument (such as a keyboard) connected to two channel inputs of the mixer (either one panned hard left and hard right), you would send the left channel to send 3 and the right channel to send 4.
Dual Mono. Alternatively, you could have two discrete effect sends between the Left and Right channel, and process them separately within the MidiVerb 4 by using one of the Dual Mono Configurations (see chapter 3). Again, using 2 aux sends from the mixer, connect two mono cords to the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] inputs of the MidiVerb 4, and connect two other mono cords from the [LEFT/CH.1] and [RIGHT/CH.2] outputs of the MidiVerb 4 to two mixer inputs. This hookup allows discrete processing of the two channels, since separate effects are dedicated to each channel.

Quad Chorus

Quad Chorus modulates four delayed signals, each with its phase offset by 90. Each of the four signals has a separate Predelay variable, allowing you to change the rhythm of the phasing.

Chorus

This is a mono, less processor-intensive version of the Stereo Chorus effect, used in the Multi Chain Configurations Chorus->Realroom and Chorus->Dly->Room, the Double Configuration Realroom+Chorus, and the Dual Mono Configurations Chorus:Chorus and Chorus:Delay.

Stereo Flange

First used in the 1960s, flanging was achieved by the use of two tape recorders that would record and play back the same program in synchronization. By slowing down one tape machine, and then letting it catch up with the other, different phase cancellations would occur at different frequencies. Since the slowing down of the tape machines was done by hand pressure against the flanges of the tape supply reels, the term flanging came into being. Flanging is similar to chorusing , but modulates the delayed signal over a much shorter delay range (typically 0-12 ms). This produces a jet airplane-like sound. The flange modulation sweep can be triggered by the audio input (either the left or right input, or both), in order to sync up with the rhythm of your playing. You can adjust the attack and release threshold of this audio triggering function. In the case of the Stereo Flange, the signal is split into three parts with a dry signal and a separate Delay section for both left and right channels with one channel flanging up while the other channel flanges down. Once again, this causes the effect to become more pronounced and dramatic.
When flanging was done using two tape machines, it was possible for one to be behind the other, catch up and then go past the other. This is called passing through zero. The zero point is when both signals were in perfect synchronization. Since the MidiVerb 4 is digitally simulating the flanging effect, it normally cannot provide the through zero effect. Instead, it delays the effected signal to a point, then brings it back to the zero point, and repeats this over and over. The Thru0 parameter found in the MidiVerb 4s flanging effects lets you create the appearance of the effected signal passing through the zero point. It does this by actually delaying the uneffected signal by as mush as 12 milliseconds (an amount virtually undetectable to the human ear). This allows the wet signal to move behind the dry signal as it cycles.

Flange

This is a mono, less processor intensive version of the Stereo Flange, used in the Multi Chain Configurations Flange->Realroom, Realroom->Flange and Flange->Dly>Room; the Double Configuration Realroom+Flange; and the Dual Mono Configurations Flange:Flange and Flange:Delay. The effect of mono flanging is achieved by splitting and slightly delaying one part of the signal, then varying the time delay, with an LFO. The delayed signal is then mixed back with the original sound to produce the swishing or tunneling sound.

Lezlie

With the Lezlie effect (found in the Lezlie->Room Configuration), the pitch change block becomes a rotating speaker simulator. This effect was extremely popular during the 1960s and was achieved by mechanically rotating the speakers to produce complex timbral changes. The Lezlie speaker system is most often used with rock organs, but is occasionally used for guitar amplification as well. Parameters include: Motor on/off, Speed, which can be slow or fast; and High Rotor Level, which lets you attenuate the volume of the high frequencies. When switching the Lezlie effect on and off, or when changing the speed between fast and slow, the effect will ramp rather than change abruptly, just as a true Lezlie speaker system would do. By raising the High Rotor Level, you can really make this effect scream. Tip: Try modulating the Motor or Speed with aftertouch.

Stereo Pitch Shifter

The Pitch Shifter effect transposes the pitch of the incoming signal by a fixed amount. It is useful for creating parallel harmonies, detuning, chorusing, and special effects. The Semi parameter shifts the pitch in increments of one half step, with a range of up or down one octave. The Fine parameter detunes the signal in very fine increments, with a range of up or down one half step. Also available are Delay and Feedback parameters. The Delay parameter delays the shifted signal up to 250 ms, or can be used with the Feedback parameter to produce decaying arpeggio effects. There are also Low Cut and High Cut filters in the feedback loop which can be used to alter the timbre of the sound as it repeats. The Stereo Pitch Shift configuration provides two discrete pitch shifters, each with their own Pan and Level control.
This is a less processor-intensive version of the Pitch Shifter effect, used in the Multi Chain Configuration Pitch:Delay, and the Dual Mono Configuration Pitch:Pitch.

Auto Pan

The Auto Pan effect alternates the loudness of the signal in opposite channels at a definable rate. Low and high frequency cutting is available, and (like the flange effects) can be triggered by the input signal (either the left or right input, or both).

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If you decide you want to select a different Program, you can always get back to Program mode by pressing [PROG] again. However, if you select another Program after making changes and without storing the Program back into memory, the changes you have made will be lost. To make your changes to the Program permanent, you must store the Program somewhere in the User bank. If the Program is already in the Preset bank and you store it, you will automatically be taken into the User bank.
Description of Controls Chapter 5

CHAPTER 5

DESCRIPTION OF CONTROLS

Front Panel

LCD Display
Program Number. MidiVerb 4 Programs are numbered from 00 to 127. In this example the Program selected is number 01. Bank. The MidiVerb 4 has two Banks of 128 Programs: the Preset Bank and User Bank. The display will either say PRESET or USER, depending on the current Bank. In this example we are in the Preset Bank. Program Name. Each Program has its own eight character name. This one is called Lrg Hall. The 128 User Programs can be renamed; the 128 Preset Programs are pre-programmed at the factory and cannot be renamed. Configuration. This tells us which effects are used by this Program, the order in which our input signal(s) will pass through them, and whether this is a Stereo or Dual Configuration (more about Configurations in Chapter 3). The Configuration for this Program is called CONCERT HALL. Level Meters. These peak style meters monitor the signal strength of the unprocessed inputs, and are used in much the same
Chapter 5 Description of Controls way as the level meters on a standard tape recorder. The meters shown in this example are idle, indicating that there is no input signal activity. Normally, these are labeled as L and R. However, when the selected Program uses a Dual type Configuration (two mono effects), these will be labeled as CH1 and CH2. For more information on Dual Configurations, see Chapter 3.

When editing a Program, the display changes slightly to indicate additional information. Once in Edit mode, the display will look something like this:
Decay LPF PDly PMix PRESET 395 2@8 150 000
Page Numbers. Depending on the Configuration, there will be up to four pages available in Edit mode. In this example, only three pages are available. Selected Page. The currently selected page will be indicated by a box around its number. In this example, page 1 is currently selected. Each time you press the [EDIT/PAGE] button, the display will advance to the next page. Parameter Name Strip. Each page in Edit mode contains up to four parameters. whose names will appear at the top of the display, above their value settings. Parameter Values and Bar Graphs. Each parameter in the selected page is shown with both a numerical value and a bargraph. As you adjust a parameter, both its numerical value and bargraph will change in relation to the [VALUE] knobs position. The type of units a parameter uses will be shown as well (dB, mSec, kHz, etc.). A, B, C, D and EDITED Indicators. Each parameter in the selected page is

BYPASS LED Indicator

The [BYPASS] LED will be lit whenever Bypass mode is enabled. Bypass mode can be toggled on and off by simultaneously pressing the [PROG] and [UTIL] buttons, or by pressing a footswitch connected to the [FOOTSWITCH] jack (if the footswitch is switched to act as a Bypass function; see UTILity Button, next page).

VALUE Knob

The [VALUE] knob is used to raise or lower the selected value in the display by turning either clockwise or counterclockwise. If the [PROG] button is lit, turning the [VALUE] knob lets you scroll through the internal Programs. When an effect parameter is selected (flashing in the display), turning the [VALUE] knob will alter its value.

PROGram Button

The [PROG] button is used to select Program mode. When Program mode is selected, the [PROG] button will be lit. The [VALUE] knob may then be used to scroll through programs. The [PROG] button is also used to toggle between the Preset and User banks. The display will show either "PRESET" or "USER" indicating the currently selected bank. The [PROG] button is also used in conjunction with the [UTIL] button to toggle between "BYPASS" ON and "BYPASS" OFF.

MIDI In

This is a 5 pin DIN standard MIDI plug which connects to any MIDI compatible equipment such as a MIDI sequencer that will send program changes and controller information to the unit.
This is a 5 pin DIN standard MIDI plug which connects to any MIDI compatible equipment such as a keyboard or another effects device. Provided for sending MIDI program change commands as well as sending system exclusive commands for storing programs. It also relays all messages received on the [MIDI IN] if MIDI THRU is enabled. The MIDI THRU function is found in the UTILity mode (see UTILity Button, earlier in this chapter).
Input (Left/Ch.1 & Right/Ch.2)
MidiVerb 4 Reference Manual 49
These are 1/4" phone jacks which connect to sources such as the effects sends of mixing consoles. They may be used with nominal input levels from -10dBV (guitar level) to +4dBu. For mono applications, use the [LEFT/CH.1] input. The [LEFT/CH.1] input jack is normalled to the [RIGHT/CH.2] jack. This means that when nothing is plugged into the [RIGHT/CH.2] input jack, the signal present at the [LEFT/CH.1] input is routed to the [RIGHT/CH.2] as well.
Output (Left/Ch.1 & Right/Ch.2)
These are 1/4" phone jacks which connect to devices such as the effects returns on a mixing console. For mono applications, use the [LEFT/CH.1] output.
When Cascade mode is on (routing the output of Ch. 1 to the input of Ch. 2 of Dual Configurations only), the [LEFT/CH.1] output will only supply the signal coming from the effect on channel 1. However, the [RIGHT/CH.2] output will provide the cascaded output signal of the effect on channel 1 passing through the effect on channel 2. This means when you are using a mono connection ([LEFT/CH.1] input and output only), you must connect to the [RIGHT/CH.2] output to hear both effects of channels 1 and 2. in Cascade mode.

Effect Parameters

The following chart lists the parameters found on each page of each Configuration. Use this as a road map to locate a specific parameter you want to edit. Configuration CONCERT HALL Pg A 1 Decay !97-Dens 000-4 REAL ROOM AMBIENCE Decay 650-2!2 Dens 000-100 Decay !00-7%8 Dens 000-100 B LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 Gate OFF, 001-100 Swirl 00-99 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 Gate OFF, 001-100 Swirl 00-99 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 Gate OFF, 001-100 Swirl 00-99 C PDly 000-175 LDamp OFF, 059-3^2 Hold 000-500 D PMix 000-100 HDamp 059-3^2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PMix 000-100 HDamp 059-3^2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PMx 000-100 HDamp 059-3^2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100
PDly 000-250 LDamp OFF, 059-3^2 Hold 000-500
PLATE REVERB NONLINEAR MONO DELAY STEREO DELAY PING PONG DELAY Tap --Fdbk 00-99 Time 100-600 Dir For, rEv Tap --Fdbk 00-99 L: Tap --R: Tap --Decay !59-6!2 Dens 000-100 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 Gate OFF, 001-100 Swirl 00-99 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Dens 000-100 100ms 0-12 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 100ms 0-5 100ms 0-5 LFdbk 00-99 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 100ms 0-5 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 PDly 000-75 LDamp OFF, 059-3^2 Hold 000-500 PMx 000-100 HDamp 059-3^2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PDly PMx 000-250 000-100 Diff Mix 000-100 000-100 10ms 1ms 0-9 0-9 HiCut Mix 059-3^2, OFF 000-100 10ms 1ms 0-9 0-9 10ms 1ms 0-9 0-9 RFdbk 00-99 HiCut Mix 059-3^2, OFF 000-100 10ms 1ms 0-9 0-9 HiCut Mix 059-3^2, OFF 000-100

MULTI TAP DELAY

Time 1 000-250 Time 2 000-250 Time 3 000-250 MFdbk 000-100

BPM MONO DELAY

DELAY:DELAY
Tap --Fdbk 00-99 Tap --Fdbk 00-99

STEREO CHORUS

QUAD CHORUS

3 PDly 1 000-255

Lvl 1 00-99 Lvl 2 00-99 Lvl 3 00-99 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Tempo EcL, 050-250 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 100ms 0-5 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 100ms 0-5 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Rate )0-(9 LPDly 000-255 Rate )0-(9 PDly 2 000-255
Pan 1 -50-50 Pan 2 -50-50 Pan 3 -50-50 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF Note 4-32 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF 10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF 10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF Depth 000-255 RPDly 000-255 Depth 000-255 PDly 3 000-255

CHORUS: CHORUS

Rate )0-(9
Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri

Fdbk 00-99

Fdbk 1 00-99 Fdbk 2 00-99 Fdbk 3 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 PDly 4 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100

STEREO FLANGE

FLANGE: FLANGE

LEZLIE}ROOM

STEREOPITCHSH FT
Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Motor OFF, On Decay 946-4#4 Gate OFF, 001-100 SemiL -12-12 PDlyL 000-250 LvlL 00-99
Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Speed SLo, FSt LPF 059-3^2, OFF Hold 000-500 FineL -50-50 FdbkL 00-99 PanL -50-50 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Fine -50-50 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Fine -50-50 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Dir Lr,rL,ALt Attck 0-255
Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On HiRot 000-250 Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 SemiR -12-12 PDlyR 000-250 LvlR 00-99 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Hold 0-990
Thru0 OFF, On Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Mix 000-100 Diff 000-100 RMix 000-100 FineR -50-50 FdbkR 00-99 PanR -50-50 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF Mix 000-100

PITCH:PITCH

Semi -12-12

Cleaning
Disconnect the AC cord, then use a damp cloth to clean the MidiVerb 4s metal and plastic surfaces. For heavy dirt, use a non-abrasive household cleaner such as Formula 409 or Fantastik. DO NOT SPRAY THE CLEANER DIRECTLY ONTO THE FRONT OF THE UNIT AS IT MAY DESTROY THE LUBRICANTS USED IN THE SWITCHES AND CONTROLS! Spray onto a cloth, then use cloth to clean the unit.
Refer All Servicing to Alesis
We believe that the MidiVerb 4 is one of the most reliable multi-effects processors that can be made using current technology, and should provide years of trouble-free use. However, should problems occur, DO NOT attempt to service the unit yourself. High voltage/high current DC voltages are present at several points within the chassis. Service on this product should be performed only by qualified technicians. NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE.

Obtaining Repair Service

Before contacting Alesis, check over all your connections, and make sure youve read the manual. Customers in the USA: If the problem persists, call Alesis USA at 1-800-5-ALESIS and request the Product Support department. Talk the problem over with one of our technicians; if necessary, you will be given a return authorization (RA) number and instructions on how to return the unit. All units must be shipped prepaid and COD shipments will not be accepted. For prompt service, indicate the RA number on the shipping label. If you do not have the original packing, ship the MidiVerb 4 in a sturdy carton, with shock-absorbing materials such as styrofoam pellets (the kind without CFCs) or bubble-pack surrounding the unit. Shipping damage caused by inadequate packing is not covered by the Alesis warranty. Tape a note to the top of the unit describing the problem, include your name and a phone number where Alesis can contact you if necessary, as well as instructions on where you want the product returned. Alesis will pay for standard one-way shipping back to you on any repair covered under the terms of this warranty. Next day service is available for a surcharge. Field repairs are not normally authorized during the warranty period, and repair attempts by unqualified personnel may invalidate the warranty.
Service address for customers in the USA: Alesis Product Support 3630 Holdrege Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90016 Customers outside the USA: Contact your local Alesis dealer for warranty assistance. Do not return products to the factory unless you have been given specific instructions to do so. Note that the warranty is valid only in the country of origin.

doc1

PDly 000-175 LDamp OFF, 0593&2 Hold 000-500
PMix 000-100 HDamp 059-3&2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PMix 000-100 HDamp 059-3&2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PMx 000-100

1 Decay !00-7%Dens 000-4

AMBIENCE

1 Decay 650-2!2

PDly 000-175
2 Dens 000-4 PLATE REVERB 1 Decay !59-6!Dens 000-4 NONLINEAR 1 Time 00-Dir for, reu 1 Tap --2 Fdbk 00-99
Diff 000-100 Gate OFF, 001-100 Swirl 00-99 LPF 059-3&2, OFF Diff 000-100 Gate OFF, 001-100 Swirl 00-99 LPF 059-3&2, OFF Dens 000-100 100ms 0-12 LoCut OFF, 0593&2 100ms 0-5 100ms 0-5 LFdbk 00-99 LoCut OFF, 0593&2 100ms 0-5 LoCut OFF, 0593&2
LDamp OFF, 0593&2 Hold 000-500
HDamp 059-3&2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PMx 000-100 HDamp 059-3&2, OFF Rel 000-500 Mix 000-100 PMx 000-100 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 1ms 0-9 RFdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100
PDly 000-175 Diff 000-100 10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF 10ms 0-9 10ms 0-9

MONO DELAY

STEREO DELAY 1 L: Tap --2 R: Tap --PING PONG DELAY 1 Tap --2 Fdbk 00-99
HiCut 059-3&2, OFF 10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF

MULTI TAP DELAY

1 Time 1 000-Time 2 000-Time 3 000-MFdbk 000-2

BPM MONO DELAY

DELAY:DELAY
1 Tap --2 Fdbk 00-Tap --4 Fdbk 00-99
MONO CHORUS 1 Rate =0-)STEREO CHORUS QUAD CHORUS PDly 1 000-CHORUS: CHORUS 1 Rate =0-)3 Rate =0-)9 4
Lvl 1 00-99 Lvl 2 00-99 Lvl 3 00-99 LoCut OFF, 0593&2 Tempo EcL, 050-250 LoCut OFF, 0593&2 100ms 0-5 LoCut OFF, 0593&2 100ms 0-5 LoCut OFF, 0593&2 Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri Rate =0-)9 LPDly 000-255 Rate =0-)9 PDly 2 000-255
Pan 1 -50-50 Pan 2 -50-50 Pan 3 -50-50 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF Note 4-32 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF 10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF 10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF Fdbk 00-99
Fdbk 1 00-99 Fdbk 2 00-99 Fdbk 3 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 PDly 4 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100

Depth 000-255 RPDly 000-255 Depth 000-255 PDly 3 000-255
Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri

Fdbk 00-99

STEREO FLANGE

FLANGE: FLANGE

LEZLIEROOM
1 Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 1 Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 3 Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 1 Motor OFF, On 2 Decay 946-44

STEREOPITCHS HFT

PITCH:PITCH

AUTO PAN

Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Speed SLo, FSt LPF 059-3&2, OFF 3 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-SemiL FineL -12-12 -50-PDlyL FdbkL 000-250 00-LvlL PanL 00-99 -50-LoCut OFF, 0593&Semi Fine -12-12 -50-LoCut OFF, 0593&Semi Fine -12-12 -50-LoCut OFF, 0593&Rate Dir =0-2%5 Lr,rL,ALt 2 Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr Attck 0-255
Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On HiRot 000-250 Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 SemiR -12-12 PDlyR 000-250 LvlR 00-99 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF LoCut OFF, 0593&2 Hold 0-990
Thru0 OFF, On Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Mix 000-100 Diff 000-100 RMix 000-100 FineR -50-50 FdbkR 00-99 PanR -50-50 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF Mix 000-100

DELAY REALROOM

1 Tap --Decay !0-7%8

100ms 0-7 Fdbk 00-99

CHORUS REALROOM
LPF 059-3&2, OFF 4 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-Rate Depth =0-)9 000-Wave Sin, tri 3 Decay LPF !0-7%8 059-3&2, OFF 4 Dens Diff 000-100 000-Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 3 Decay !0-7%Dens 000-100 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 LPF 059-3&2, OFF Diff 000-100 LPF 059-3&2, OFF Diff 000-100 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255
10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 Fdbk 00-99
1ms 0-9 DMix 000-100 Diff 000-100 RMix 000-100 CDly 000-255 CMix 000-100 PMix 000-100 RMix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri FMix 000-100 PMix 000-100 RMix 000-100 PMix 000-100 RMix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri FMix 000-100
PDly 000-175 Gate OFF, 010500 Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010500 PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010500 Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255

FLANGE REALROOM

REALROOM FLANGE
1 Decay !0-7%Dens 000-Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr

CHORUSDLY ROOM

1 Rate =0-)Time 000-Decay !0-7%8

Depth 000-255 Fdbk 00-99

FLANGEDLY ROOM
LPF 059-3&2, OFF 4 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-Rate Depth =0-)9 000-Tap Fdbk 000-500 00-99 LPF 059-3&2, OFF 4 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-Decay LPF !0-7%8 059-3&2, OFF 2 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-Tap 100ms --0-Fdbk HiCut 00-99 059-3&2, OFF 1 Decay LPF !0-7%8 059-3&2, OFF 2 Dens Diff 000-100 000-Rate =0-)Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri 3 Decay !0-7%8

 

Technical specifications

Full description

The MidiVerb 4 is the perfect effects processor for professional project studios and musicians who require an affordable solution for fully-programmable, high-fidelity effects. Its excellent effects algorithms produce dense, natural reverb, rich chorus, flange, delay, pitch effects and up to three simultaneous multieffects. The MidiVerb 4 offers 18 bit A/D and D/A converters and 24 bit internal processing for a 20Hz-20kHz bandwidth and 90dB dynamic range, making it ideal for digital recording. Plus, its valuable Auto Level Sensing feature can instantly set the optimum input levels...a great time-saver.

 

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