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Alesis Midiverb4

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About

Alesis Midiverb4Alesis MidiVerb 4 - Digital Reverb and Multi-Effects Processor
The MidiVerb 4 is the perfect effects processor for professional project studios and musicians who require an affordable solution for fully-programmable, high-fidelity effects. Its excellent effects algorithms produce dense, natural reverb, rich chorus, flange, delay, pitch effects and up to three simultaneous multieffects. The MidiVerb 4 offers 18 bit A/D and D/A converters and 24 bit internal processing for a 20Hz-20kHz bandwidth and 90dB dynamic range, making it ideal for digital recording. P... Read more

Details
Brand: ALESIS
Part Numbers: MD4X110, MIDIVERB 4, MIDIVERB-4, MIDIVERB4, MidiVerb 4, MidiVerb4, SKU72200
UPC: 0694318001639, 694318001639

 

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bmonchka 8:30am on Friday, May 28th, 2010 
HOT FOR GIGGING This is the one for you whether on a budget or not. Great for gigging. Professional sound.

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It is important to register your purchase; if you have not already filled out your warranty card and mailed it back to Alesis, please take the time to do so now.

Basic Connections

The MidiVerb 4 is designed to accommodate a number of applications, whether you are connecting an instrument directly into it, or connecting it with a mixing console. Briefly described here are the basic connections to get you up and running quickly. For more information on connections, please refer to Chapter 2. Mono In, Mono or Stereo Out. Connect a mono cord to the [LEFT/CH.1] INPUT of the MidiVerb 4 from a mono source (Note: the [LEFT/CH.1] INPUT is normalled to the [RIGHT/CH.2] INPUT). Connect another mono cord from the [LEFT/CH.1] OUTPUT of the MidiVerb 4 to an amplification system or mixer input. Additionally, you could connect a second mono cord to the [RIGHT/CH.2] OUTPUT for use with a stereo amplification system, or two mixer inputs. Stereo. Connect two mono cords to the [LEFT/CH.1] & [RIGHT/CH.2] INPUTS of the MidiVerb 4 from a stereo source , and two mono cords from the OUTPUTS of the MidiVerb 4 to a stereo amplification system or two mixer inputs.
If connecting to a mixing consoles aux sends/returns, you will want to adjust the output mix of each Program so that the MidiVerb 4 outputs only wet (effected) signal. This can be done globally for all Programs simultaneously (see page 11).

Powering Up

MidiVerb 4 Reference Manual 7
Chapter 1 Your First Session with the MIDIVerb 4
After making your connections, turn on the systems power using this procedure:
Before turning on the MidiVerb 4s power, check the following items:
Have all connections been made correctly? Are the volume controls of the amplifier or mixer turned down?
Turn on the [POWER] switch on the front panel of the MidiVerb 4.
Upon power-up, the display will briefly read ALESIS MIDIVERB 4, and will then display the last selected Program Number (00127, PRESET or USER Bank), and the [PROG] buttons LED will be lit.
Turn on the power of the amplifier/mixer, and adjust the volume.

Setting Levels

Proper setting of the input and output levels is crucial in order to achieve the maximum signal-to-noise ratio. As a good rule of thumb, it is always best to set both input and output level controls at 3/4 or 75% of full. This will decrease the possibility of overload distortion and keep the amount of background noise to a minimum.
Automatic Input Level Settings
The MidiVerb 4 has the unique ability to automatically select the proper levels for the inputs based on the signal you are routing to it. In other words, you tell the it to autoadjust levels, and then feed it a signal (play your guitar or keyboard, or playback tape); the MidiVerb 4 does the rest. To auto-adjust the input levels:

Changing Effect Settings

When you dial up a Program, its Configuration is shown in the display to the right of the Programs name.

RoomVerb

REAL ROOM
The Configuration will either be a single reverb type effect (as in the example above), or a combination of two or three effects (like Reverb+Delay, or Chorus>Delay> Reverb). Once you have identified what effects are used in the Programs Configuration, you can then find the effect parameters more easily. To edit a Programs effect settings, you must first enter Edit mode. This is done by pressing either the [PAGE] button or any one of the [A], [B], [C] or [D] buttons, as long as the [PROG] button is lit (Note: Pressing these buttons in other modes performs different functions). Once in Edit mode, the display will look something like this:

PAGE 3

Decay 80

LPF 22.8

B EDITED

PDly 150

PMix 000

2 Page Numbers

. Depending on the Configuration, there will be up to four pages available in Edit mode. In this example, only three pages are available.

Selected Page

. The currently selected page will be indicated by a box around its number. In this example, page 1 is currently selected. Each time you press the [PAGE] button, the display will advance to the next page. Each page in Edit mode contains up to four parameters. whose names will appear at the top of the display, above their value settings.

Parameter Name Strip

Parameter Values and Bar Graphs
. Each parameter is shown with both a numerical value and a bargraph. As you adjust a parameter, both its numerical value and bargraph will change in relation to the [VALUE] knobs position. The type of units a parameter uses will be shown as well (dB, mSec, kHz, etc.).
A, B, C, D and EDITED Indicators. Each parameter in the selected page is
designated by a letter (A, B, C or D), which indicates which button ([A], [B], [C] or [D]) should be pressed to select the desired parameter for editing. Once a parameter has been edited, the word EDITED will appear below it.

Each time the [PROG] and [UTIL] buttons are pressed, or the footswitch connected to the [FOOTSWITCH] jack is pressed, Bypass mode is toggled on and off again. When Bypass mode is turned on, the [BYPASS] LED will be lit. To set the [FOOTSWITCH] jack to the Bypass function:
Press [EDIT/PAGE] until page 1 is selected.
Footswitch Dry Defeat Press [B] to select the Footswitch parameter. Turn the [VALUE] knob to set the Footswitch parameter to Bypass mode (bYP).

Connections Chapter 2

CHAPTER 2

CONNECTIONS

AC Power Hookup
The MidiVerb 4 comes with a power adapter suitable for the voltage of the country it is shipped to (either 110 or 220V, 50 or 60 Hz). With the MidiVerb 4 off, plug the small end of the power adapter cord into MidiVerb 4s [POWER] socket and the male (plug) end into a source of AC power. Its good practice to not turn the MidiVerb 4 on until all other cables are hooked up.
Alesis cannot be responsible for problems caused by using the MidiVerb 4 or any associated equipment with improper AC wiring.
Line Conditioners and Protectors
Although the MidiVerb 4 is designed to tolerate typical voltage variations, in todays world the voltage coming from the AC line may contain spikes or transients that can possibly stress your gear and, over time, cause a failure. There are three main ways to protect against this, listed in ascending order of cost and complexity: Line spike/surge protectors. Relatively inexpensive, these are designed to protect against strong surges and spikes, acting somewhat like fuses in that they need to be replaced if theyve been hit by an extremely strong spike. Line filters. These generally combine spike/surge protection with filters that remove some line noise (dimmer hash, transients from other appliances, etc.). Uninterruptible power supply (UPS). This is the most sophisticated option. A UPS provides power even if the AC power line fails completely. Intended for computer applications, a UPS allows you to complete an orderly shutdown of a computer system in the event of a power outage, and the isolation it provides from the power line minimizes all forms of interferencespikes, noise, etc.

Audio Connections

The connections between the MidiVerb 4 and your studio are your musics lifeline, so use only high quality cables. These should be low-capacitance shielded cables with a stranded (not solid) internal conductor and a low-resistance shield. Although quality cables cost more, they do make a difference. Route cables to the MidiVerb 4 correctly by observing the following precautions: Do not bundle audio cables with AC power cords. Avoid running audio cables near sources of electromagnetic interference such as transformers, monitors, computers, etc. Never unplug a cable by pulling on the wire itself. Always unplug by firmly grasping the body of the plug and pulling directly outward.

Chapter 2 Connections Using Inserts
By using individual channel inserts, you can dedicate the MidiVerb 4 to a specific channel (or pair of channels) on the mixer. The Insert connections on the back of the mixer provide a way of inserting external processing equipment into the signal path. The insert occurs after the input amplifier, and before the main fader; essentially it is the same as connecting the source (instrument or microphone) into the MidiVerb 4 before the mixers channel input. However, some mixing consoles inserts come after the EQ section, and may therefore be different from the original signal. If nothing is connected to the channels Insert jack, the signal is not routed there. Usually, insert connections require a special, stereo-splitting Y-cord to be connected (one stereo plug provides both send and return while two mono plugs connect separately to an input and output). These are known as TRS connectors (tip-ringsleeve). The tip of the stereo plug carries the send or output of the insert jack, while the ring carries back the return. The sleeve represents a common ground for both signals. Mono. This involves connecting a 1/4" TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) Y-cable to the Insert jack of a single channel on a mixing console. The other end of the cable (which splits into two, 1/4" mono connectors) are connected to the [LEFT/CH.1] input and [LEFT/CH.1] output, respectively. If you do not hear any audio after making these connections, swap the input and output cables at the MidiVerb 4, as these may be wired backwards. If the cable is color-coded, usually the red jack represents the send (which connects to the MidiVerb 4s input) and black is the return (which connects to the output).
Dual Mono. Alternatively, you could have two channels inserts connected to the Left and Right Inputs, and process them separately within the MidiVerb 4 by using one of the Dual Configurations (see chapter 3). Connect a 1/4" TRS Y-cable to the Insert jack of a single channel on a mixing console. Connect the other end of the cable (which splits into two, 1/4" mono connectors) to the [LEFT/CH.1] input and [LEFT/CH.1] output. Connect another 1/4" TRS Y-cable to the Insert jack of another single channel on a mixing console. Connect the other end of this cable to the [RIGHT/CH.2] input and [RIGHT/CH.2] output. This hookup allows discrete processing of the two channels, since separate effects are dedicated to each channel.
Stereo. In the case where a stereo instrument (such as a keyboard or sampler) is connected to two separate channels of a mixing console, you will need two 1/4" TRS cables, one for each channel. The connection is made in a similar fashion as described above.

TO ELIMINATE HUM IF THE ABOVE HAS FAILED:
A) Disconnect the power from all outboard devices and tape machines except for the mixer and control room monitor power amp. B) Plug in each tape machine and outboard effects device one at a time. If possible, flip the polarity of the plug of each device (turn it around in the socket) until the quietest position is found. C) Make sure that all of the audio cables are in good working order. Cables with a detached ground wire will cause a very loud hum!! D) Keep all cables as short as possible, especially in unbalanced circuits. If the basic experiments dont uncover the source of the problem, consult your dealer or technician trained in proper studio grounding techniques. In some cases, a star grounding scheme must be used, with the mixer at the center of the star providing the shield ground on telescoping shields, which do NOT connect to the chassis ground of other equipment in the system.
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is an internationally-accepted protocol that allows musical-related data to be conveyed from one device to another. The MIDI connections on the MidiVerb 4 provide four different functions: To recall Programs using MIDI program change messages To control (modulate) parameters inside the MidiVerb 4 in realtime via MIDI controllers (example: A keyboards mod wheel, or pedals, etc.) To send and receive Sysex (System Exclusive) dumps of individual programs or the entire bank of programs for storage and retrieval purposes To pass-on MIDI information thru the MidiVerb 4 to another MIDI device.
To connect the MidiVerb 4s MIDI ports to another MIDI device:
Connect a MIDI cable from the MidiVerb 4s MIDI [IN] connector to the other
MIDI devices MIDI OUT connector.
Connect another MIDI cable from the MidiVerb 4s MIDI [OUT/THRU] connector
to the MIDI IN connector of the other MIDI device. Note: It is not necessary to follow step 2 if you intend to only send information to the MidiVerb 4, and do not need to receive information back from it. Example: If you only want to be able to recall Programs using MIDI program change messages, there is no need to connect a cable to the MidiVerb 4s [OUT/THRU] connector. For more information about MIDI and Modulation, refer to chapter 6.

The Architecture of the MidiVerb 4

What is a Configuration?

A Configuration is an arrangement of one or more effects. Each of the 256 internal Programs in the MidiVerb 4 use one Configuration. There are 32 different Configurations available, each of which fall into one of four categories. The four types of Configurations are: Single, Double, Dual Mono and Multi Chain.

Single

A Single Configuration consists of one effect. These Configurations utilize complex, processor-intensive effect algorithms providing the best quality possible for each effect type supported. There are different kinds of Single Configurations, including: Mono-in/mono-out. These effects have a single input (both inputs summed together) and a single output (routed to both outputs).
Mono-in/stereo-out. These effects have a single mono input and two outputs.
Stereo-in/stereo-out. These effects have two inputs and two outputs.
In each case, the dry, uneffected signal of both inputs are also routed to the outputs.
Chapter 3 Overview of Effects

Double

Double Configurations consist of two side-by-side mono-in/stereo-out effects. These Configurations are identified by the presence of a + in their name. In each case, the Left/Ch. 1 input is routed to one effect, while the Right/Ch. 2 input is routed to the other. The stereo outputs of both effects are then summed together to the outputs. The dry, uneffected signal of both inputs are also routed to the outputs.

Dual Mono

Dual Mono Configurations provide two mono-in/mono-out effects, one for each channel. These Configurations are identified by the presence of a : in their name (Delay:Delay). The Left/Ch. 1 input is routed to the first effect, whose output is routed to the Left/Ch. 1 output. Likewise, the Right/Ch. 2 input is routed to the second effect, whose output is routed to the Right/Ch. 2 output.
These effects can be chained using a special feature called Cascade mode. Cascade mode only affects Dual Mono Configurations, and routes the output of the channel 1 effect into the input of the channel 2 effect. The Cascade function can be turned on and off from page 2 in Utility mode (see Chapter 5). In this case, the Left/Ch. 1 output provides only the channel 1 effects output, while the Right/Ch. 2 output provides the output of channel 1s effect routed through channel 2s effect.
Note: If Cascade mode is turned on, the [RIGHT/CH. 2] input will be disabled for all Dual Mono Configurations. This is because the channel 2 effect is being fed the output of the channel 1 effect.

Multi Chain

The Multi Chain Configurations provide two or three stereo effects, which are connected in series; i.e. one feeding the next in the chain. These Configurations are identified by the presence of one or two -> symbols in their name (Example: Chorus->Real Room). These individual effect types provide excellent sound quality but are less processor-intensive than their Single Configuration equivalents, since the Digital Signal Processor is accommodating more than one effect at a time. In other words, the reverb effect in the Delay->Realroom Configuration is not as dense as the Single Configuration called Realroom.

While using either of these methods, feed signal to the MidiVerb 4. This could be done by hitting a drum, plucking notes on a guitar or keyboard, or by singing some doot doots into a microphone (depending on what is connected). Note: When the Footswitch parameter is set to the Control function, you can control tap tempo as described above while in either Program mode ([PROG] button lit) or Edit mode ([EDIT/PAGE] button lit), unlike when using the front panel for tap tempo which requires that you be in Edit mode. For more information on connecting a footswitch and selecting the Footswitch parameters function, see Chapter 2.

Pitch Effects

The Pitch effects alter the pitch of a signal in various ways to produce layered timbres that are more complex than the original signal. Although some of these effects can sound similar to one another depending on the parameter settings, each is achieved differently and can be quite dramatic under the right circumstances. Pitch effects are achieved by splitting the signal into at least two parts, effecting the pitch of one of the parts, then mixing them back together. This eventual mixing is essential since the overall sound of the effect is achieved by the actual difference between the dry, uneffected signal and the effects signal. The various types of Pitch change are:

Stereo Chorus

The Chorus effect is achieved by splitting the signal into three parts with a dry signal and a separate Detuning section for both left and right channels. When the left channel is detuned sharp, the right is detuned flat, and vice versa. The detuning is further effected by being modulated by an LFO (low frequency oscillator) which causes the detuning to vary. Many variables are available in this scheme: the Predelay can be varied, the LFO depth can be varied, the LFO speed can be varied, and a portion of the detuned signal can be fed back to the input to increase the effect. Finally, the waveform shape of the LFO can be changed from a smooth sinewave, to a more abrupt squarewave to make the pitch detuning more pronounced.

Quad Chorus

Quad Chorus modulates four delayed signals, each with its phase offset by 90. Each of the four signals has a separate Predelay variable, allowing you to change the rhythm of the phasing.

Chorus

This is a mono, less processor-intensive version of the Stereo Chorus effect, used in the Multi Chain Configurations Chorus->Realroom and Chorus->Dly->Room, the Double Configuration Realroom+Chorus, and the Dual Mono Configurations Chorus:Chorus and Chorus:Delay.

Stereo Flange

First used in the 1960s, flanging was achieved by the use of two tape recorders that would record and play back the same program in synchronization. By slowing down one tape machine, and then letting it catch up with the other, different phase cancellations would occur at different frequencies. Since the slowing down of the tape machines was done by hand pressure against the flanges of the tape supply reels, the term flanging came into being. Flanging is similar to chorusing , but modulates the delayed signal over a much shorter delay range (typically 0-12 ms). This produces a jet airplane-like sound. The flange modulation sweep can be triggered by the audio input (either the left or right input, or both), in order to sync up with the rhythm of your playing. You can adjust the attack and release threshold of this audio triggering function. In the case of the Stereo Flange, the signal is split into three parts with a dry signal and a separate Delay section for both left and right channels with one channel flanging up while the other channel flanges down. Once again, this causes the effect to become more pronounced and dramatic.
When flanging was done using two tape machines, it was possible for one to be behind the other, catch up and then go past the other. This is called passing through zero. The zero point is when both signals were in perfect synchronization. Since the MidiVerb 4 is digitally simulating the flanging effect, it normally cannot provide the through zero effect. Instead, it delays the effected signal to a point, then brings it back to the zero point, and repeats this over and over. The Thru0 parameter found in the MidiVerb 4s flanging effects lets you create the appearance of the effected signal passing through the zero point. It does this by actually delaying the uneffected signal by as mush as 12 milliseconds (an amount virtually undetectable to the human ear). This allows the wet signal to move behind the dry signal as it cycles.

EDIT/PAGE Button

The [EDIT/PAGE] button is used in either Program or Utility mode to advance through the available pages. When [EDIT/PAGE] is pressed in Program mode, the Programs parameters will be displayed for editing. When the [EDIT/PAGE] button is pressed in the Utility mode it advances through the various pages of Utility functions. The total number of pages will appear in the lower left corner of the display, and the currently selected page will have a box around it. Each time [EDIT/PAGE] is pressed it will advance to the next page; when the last page is reached it cycles back to the first page.
A/B/C/D (NAME/ESC/</>) Buttons
The [A], [B], [C] and [D] buttons are used in Program mode to select the parameters to be edited within each of the available page. When in Program mode, pressing any of the [A], [B], [C] and [D] buttons will select the corresponding parameter (A, B, C, or D) in the display, and the selected parameter will flash. When selecting a parameter, if the corresponding [A], [B], [C] or [D] button is held for longer than one second, a brief description of that parameter will appear in the display. This is the MidiVerb 4s built-in online help system. If there is no corresponding parameter for one or more of the [A], [B], [C] and [D] buttons in a particular page, it will be indicated in the display when the button is pushed. For example, if you were editing an effect in page one which did not have an A parameter displayed and the [A] button was pressed, the message NO "A" PARAM ON PAGE 1 would briefly appear. The [A], [B], [C] and [D] buttons also serve another function. When in Store mode ([STORE] button flashing), the [A], [B], [C] and [D] buttons are used to change the Programs name. Pressing [A/NAME] moves the cursor in the display to the first
Chapter 5 Description of Controls
character of the Programs name. The [C/<] and [D/>] buttons move the cursor left and right, respectively, through the eight character fields of the Programs name. To move the cursor back to the Program location number, press [B/ESC].

CHORUS: CHORUS

Rate )0-(9
Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri

Fdbk 00-99

Fdbk 1 00-99 Fdbk 2 00-99 Fdbk 3 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 PDly 4 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100

STEREO FLANGE

FLANGE: FLANGE

LEZLIE}ROOM

STEREOPITCHSH FT
Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Motor OFF, On Decay 946-4#4 Gate OFF, 001-100 SemiL -12-12 PDlyL 000-250 LvlL 00-99
Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Speed SLo, FSt LPF 059-3^2, OFF Hold 000-500 FineL -50-50 FdbkL 00-99 PanL -50-50 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Fine -50-50 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Fine -50-50 LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Dir Lr,rL,ALt Attck 0-255
Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On HiRot 000-250 Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 SemiR -12-12 PDlyR 000-250 LvlR 00-99 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF LoCut OFF, 059-3^2 Hold 0-990
Thru0 OFF, On Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Mix 000-100 Diff 000-100 RMix 000-100 FineR -50-50 FdbkR 00-99 PanR -50-50 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF Mix 000-100

PITCH:PITCH

Semi -12-12

AUTO PAN

Rate )0-2%5 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr

DELAY} REALROOM

Tap ---

CHORUS} REALROOM

Decay !0-7%8 Gate OFF, 001-100 Rate )0-(9

FLANGE} REALROOM

REALROOM} FLANGE 3 4
Decay !0-7%8 Dens 000-100 Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr Decay !0-7%8 Dens 000-100 Decay !0-7%8 Dens 000-100 Rate )0-(9 Trig 0fffffffFF, L, r, Lr
100ms 0-7 Fdbk 00-99 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Hold 000-500 Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 LPF 059-3^2, OFF Diff 000-100 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255
10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3^2, OFF Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 Fdbk 00-99
PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010-500 Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010-500 PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010-500 Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255

Press the [EDIT/PAGE] button until page 3 is selected.
The display will look like this:
MIDI: Chan Thru PChg PRESET 01 0FF

PAGE 5 6

Press [B] to select the MIDI Channel parameter.
The current MIDI Channel value will be flashing to indicate it is now selected for editing. In the example above, the MIDI channel is set to 01.
Turn the [VALUE] knob to set the MIDI Channel to either 01 through 16, or 00 for
Omni mode (receives on all 16 channels simultaneously).

MIDI Thru

In order to pass on MIDI information from a control device thru the MidiVerb 4 to another MIDI device:
Connect the control devices MIDI OUT to the MidiVerb 4s [MIDI IN]. Then
connect the MidiVerb 4s [MIDI OUT] to the MIDI IN of the other device you wish to control.
Press [UTIL], then press the [EDIT/PAGE] button until page 3 is selected. Press the [D] button to turn MIDI Thru On.
Chapter 6 Advanced Applications
Receiving Program Changes
In order to recall programs on the MidiVerb 4 from a MIDI control device (keyboard, drum pad, guitar or bass controller, sequencer, etc.):
Connect the control devices MIDI OUT to the MidiVerb 4s [MIDI IN]. Press [UTIL], then press the [EDIT/PAGE] button until page 3 is selected. Press the [D] button to select the MIDI Program Change field. Use the [VALUE] knob to select either OFF, On or tbL.
When OFF, the MidiVerb 4 ignores incoming program change messages. When On, program changes received on the MIDI channel the MidiVerb 4 is set to will recall the same numbered Program in the currently selected bank When set to tbL, you can use the Program Change Table to remap incoming program change messages in order to select any MidiVerb 4 Program in either the Preset or User bank (see next section).
Note: It is possible to select either the Preset or User bank via MIDI by sending a Controller 0 message immediately followed by a program change message. A Controller 0 with a value of 0 will select the Preset bank, while a value of 1 or higher (up to 127) will select the User bank.

Program Change Table

The Program Change Table re-maps incoming program change messages so that they recall MidiVerb 4 Programs of a different number. This is especially useful since MIDI program changes only allow for 128 different programs to be recalled (0127). Using the Program Table, you can have any incoming MIDI program change message recall any of the 256 Programs in the MidiVerb 4. Example: If you programmed the Table so that program message 101 was mapped to Preset 33, sending a MIDI program change message of 101 to the MidiVerb 4 would recall Program Preset 33. To modify the Program Change Table:

Press [UTIL], then press the [EDIT/PAGE] button until page 5 is selected.

Pr o g r a m T b l :

MI DI 000

Us e r 000

Press the [C] button to select the MIDI Program Number field.
The MIDI Program Number field will flash to indicate it is selected for editing.
Advanced Applications Chapter 6 Turn the [VALUE] knob to select a MIDI program change number from 000127

to be remapped.

Press the [D] button to select the Program field.
The Program field will flash to indicate it is selected for editing.
Turn the [VALUE] knob to select a MidiVerb 4 Program for the selected MIDI
program change message to be re-mapped to (User 000127 or Preset 000127). If the [VALUE] knob is turned counterclockwise so that the value goes below User 000, the upper display will change to Pset indicating you are selecting a Program in the Preset bank.

Sysex Storage

In order to send and receive Program information via Sysex (System Exclusive) dumps using a computer, or some other Sysex storage device, or another MidiVerb 4:
Connect the other devices MIDI OUT to the MidiVerb 4s [MIDI IN]. Connect the
MidiVerb 4s [MIDI OUT] to the other devices MIDI IN. This provides two-way communication between the devices.
Press [UTIL], then press [EDIT/PAGE] button until page 6 is selected.
The [UTIL] button will now be flashing, and the display will read:
Send MIDI Sysex: All Use the [VALUE] knob to select All User Programs (All), or the currently selected
Program (Buffer), or the Program Change Table (Table).
Set the receiving MIDI device to receive or record the MIDI information about to
be sent from the MidiVerb 4.
Press the flashing [UTIL] button to transmit.
The [UTIL] button will briefly flash rapidly and the display will read:
Transmitting Sysex. When you send a Sysex dump back to the MidiVerb 4, it will automatically go
into receive mode (you do not have to do anything special). When this occurs, the display will momentarily read:

RECEIVING MIDI DATA.

Note: If an error occurs while receiving Sysex data back into the MidiVerb 4, the display will briefly indicate:

!!! SYSEX DATA ERROR !!!

If this occurs, try sending the data again. If the problem persists, it may indicate a bad MIDI cable connection or a problem with the data itself.

Service address for customers in the USA: Alesis Product Support 3630 Holdrege Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90016 Customers outside the USA: Contact your local Alesis dealer for warranty assistance. Do not return products to the factory unless you have been given specific instructions to do so. Note that the warranty is valid only in the country of origin.
MIDI Implementation Chart
MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART

Function

Basic Channel Mode Note Number Velocity Default Changed Default Messages Altered True Voice Note On Note Off Keys Chs X

Transmitted

Recognized
Mode 3 X O O X O O O O O X X X O X X X X X

Remarks

********
After Touch Pitch Bender Control Change Prog Change True #

X X X X X X X

O X X X O X X X X X
System Exclusive System Song Pos Common Song Sel Tune System Clock Realtime Commands Aux Local On/Off Messages All Notes Off Active Sense Reset Notes
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY Mode 2: OMNI ON, MONO
Mode 3: OMNI OFF, POLY Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO

O : Yes X : No

Specifications

SPECIFICATIONS

Electrical
Frequency Response: Dynamic Range: Distortion: Crosstalk: 1dB from 20Hz to 20 kHz >90dB "A" wtg., 20 Hz-22kHz <0.009% @ 1kHz, nominal level (-12 dBfs) <0.005% @ peak level <90dB below full scale
Number of Channels: Format: Nominal Level: Maximum Level: Impedence: 2 1/4" unbalanced -10 dBV +10 dBV 1M/channel stereo, 500k/channel mono

A/D - D/A Conversions

Processor Speed: Processor Memory: A/D converter: D/A converter: Sampling Frequency: 3 MIPs (million instructions per second) 64K x 16 bits 18 bit Sigma-Delta, 128 times oversampling 18 bit Sigma-Delta, 8 times oversampling 48 kHz

Output

Number of Channels: Format: Maximum Level: Nominal Level Output Impedance: 2 1/4" unbalanced +17.5dBu -20 dBV or +4dBu, front- panel adjustable 500 ohms
Controls Buttons Value PROG UTIL STORE INPUT OUTPUT Power Custom LCD display EDIT/PAGE A/NAME B/ESC C/< D/>

Switches Indicator

Input (Left/CH 1, Right/CH 2) Output (Left/CH 1, Right/CH 2) FOOTSWITCH MIDI (In, Out/Thru) Power 1/4" 2-conductor 1/4" 2-conductor 1/4" (accepts normally open or normally closed momentary footswitch, such as the Alesis PD) 5 pin DIN 9 Volt Power Transformer

Processing and Memory

User Programs (RAM): Factory Preset Programs (ROM): Internal processing resolution: Delay memory: Reverb effects: Delay effects: Pitch effects: 24 bit accumulator 1299 milliseconds Concert Hall, Real Room, Ambience, Plate Reverb, Nonlinear Mono Delay, Stereo Delay, Ping Pong Delay, Multi Tap Delay, BPM Mono Delay Stereo Chorus, Quad Chorus, Stereo Flange, Stereo Pitch Shifter Auto Pan
Special effects: Multiple effect configurations: Double: Real Room+Delay, Real Room+Chorus, Real Room+Flange Dual Mono: Delay:Delay, Chorus:Chorus, Flange:Flange, Pitch:Pitch, Chorus:Delay, Flange:Delay, Pitch:Delay Multi Chain: Delay->Real Room, Chorus->Real Room, Flange->Real Room, Lezlie->Room, Real Room->Flange, Chorus->Delay->Room, Flange->Delay->Room

doc1

Fdbk 1 00-99 Fdbk 2 00-99 Fdbk 3 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 1ms 0-9 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 PDly 4 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100 PDly 000-255 Mix 000-100
Depth 000-255 RPDly 000-255 Depth 000-255 PDly 3 000-255
Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri Depth 000-255 Wave Sin, tri

Fdbk 00-99

STEREO FLANGE

FLANGE: FLANGE

LEZLIEROOM
1 Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 1 Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 3 Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 1 Motor OFF, On 2 Decay 946-44

STEREOPITCHS HFT

PITCH:PITCH

AUTO PAN

Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 Speed SLo, FSt LPF 059-3&2, OFF 3 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-SemiL FineL -12-12 -50-PDlyL FdbkL 000-250 00-LvlL PanL 00-99 -50-LoCut OFF, 0593&Semi Fine -12-12 -50-LoCut OFF, 0593&Semi Fine -12-12 -50-LoCut OFF, 0593&Rate Dir =0-2%5 Lr,rL,ALt 2 Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr Attck 0-255
Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On Fdbk -99-99 Thru0 OFF, On HiRot 000-250 Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 SemiR -12-12 PDlyR 000-250 LvlR 00-99 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF PDly 000-250 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF LoCut OFF, 0593&2 Hold 0-990
Thru0 OFF, On Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri Mix 000-100 Mix 000-100 Diff 000-100 RMix 000-100 FineR -50-50 FdbkR 00-99 PanR -50-50 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 Fdbk 00-99 Mix 000-100 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF Mix 000-100

DELAY REALROOM

1 Tap --Decay !0-7%8

100ms 0-7 Fdbk 00-99

CHORUS REALROOM
LPF 059-3&2, OFF 4 Gate Hold OFF, 001-100 000-Rate Depth =0-)9 000-Wave Sin, tri 3 Decay LPF !0-7%8 059-3&2, OFF 4 Dens Diff 000-100 000-Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr 3 Decay !0-7%Dens 000-100 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255 LPF 059-3&2, OFF Diff 000-100 LPF 059-3&2, OFF Diff 000-100 Depth 000-250 Attck 000-255
10ms 0-9 HiCut 059-3&2, OFF Dens 000-100 Rel 000-500 Fdbk 00-99
1ms 0-9 DMix 000-100 Diff 000-100 RMix 000-100 CDly 000-255 CMix 000-100 PMix 000-100 RMix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri FMix 000-100 PMix 000-100 RMix 000-100 PMix 000-100 RMix 000-100 Wave Sin, tri FMix 000-100
PDly 000-175 Gate OFF, 010500 Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255 PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010500 PDly 000-250 Gate OFF, 010500 Fdbk -99-99 Rel 000-255

FLANGE REALROOM

REALROOM FLANGE
1 Decay !0-7%Dens 000-Rate =0-)Trig 0ff, L, r, Lr

 

Technical specifications

Full description

The MidiVerb 4 is the perfect effects processor for professional project studios and musicians who require an affordable solution for fully-programmable, high-fidelity effects. Its excellent effects algorithms produce dense, natural reverb, rich chorus, flange, delay, pitch effects and up to three simultaneous multieffects. The MidiVerb 4 offers 18 bit A/D and D/A converters and 24 bit internal processing for a 20Hz-20kHz bandwidth and 90dB dynamic range, making it ideal for digital recording. Plus, its valuable Auto Level Sensing feature can instantly set the optimum input levels...a great time-saver.

 

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