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Alesis QS61

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THE SEQUENCE & TRANSPOSE BUTTONS
At the far right on the front panel are two buttons: [SEQUENCE]. Pressing this button once puts your QS6.1 in Sequence Playback Mode. In this mode the [00] through [90] buttons select possible PCMCIA card Sequence Banks, and the [0] through [9] buttons trigger specific Sequences for playback. To exit without making a selection, just press [SEQUENCE] again. [TRANSPOSE]. You can transpose the output of your QS6.1 by holding this button down and then pressing any key on the keyboard. The transposition limit is one octave in either direction. To return to normal operation, just stop pressing on the [TRANSPOSE] button. Please note that any changes you make here will stay in place until you deliberately reset them to normal. This is done by holding the [ TRANSPOSE ] button and pressing the third C key from the left (also known as C3). To make it easy to locate, weve silkscreened that on the front panel just above the key.
PROGRAMS, MIXES, A ND BANKS
Your QS6.1 comes with 1,140 built-in Programs and Mixes. At any time you can also add hundreds more just by putting QCards or RAMcards into the [PCMCIA EXPANSION CARD] slots. Thats a lot of different sounds! In order to easily find the ones you need, you will need to know how they are arranged. Starting with

WHATS A PROGRAM?

A QS6.1 Program is a set of parameters which (A) create a specific sound and (B) can be recalled instantly at the touch of a button. There are lots of parameters, which is why many thousands of cool Programs are currently available from Alesis and third-party sources. And, of course, you can always edit these parameters yourself to create Programs that are uniquely your own. There are 640 internal Programs, divided into 5 Banks of 128 Programs each (more about Banks in a moment). To get instant access to more Banks, simply insert an Alesis QCard into one or both of the [PCMCIA EXPANSION CARD] slots. You can also add Banks using RAMcards, assuming Program data is stored on them. Each Program consists of from 1 to 4 different Sounds which can be combined and processed in many different ways: layered on top of one another, for example, or split up to cover different sections of the keyboard, or set to play (or not play) depending on how hard you strike a key. The number of Sounds being used by a Program has a direct effect on your QS6.1s polyphony, because each Sound takes one Voice to play. If your current Program uses only one Sound, youll be able to play 64 simultaneous notes. By contrast, a Program using two Sounds will run out of Voices twice as fast, limiting you to 32 simultaneous notes. And a Program that uses four Sounds will limit you to 16 notes of polyphony.

PAGE 4 KEYBOARD VELOCITY SCALING
This parameter also alters the feel of your QS6.1s keyboard, but in a different way than the Keyboard Velocity Curve setting mentioned just above. Unlike that setting, it doesnt alter the dynamic range. Instead it takes the existing velocity curve and gives it a slight bias toward either soft or hard styles of playing. Heres how it works. The range for this setting is 00 to 99. When set to 00, it scales the keyboard velocity data so that loudness increases more slowly than usual as you play harder. At 00 it is a little easier to play quietly and a little harder to play loud. Push this setting all the way up to 99 and you get the opposite: keyboard velocity is scaled to make it easier to play loud, while playing soft will require great finesse.
The factory default setting is 65, which gives an even scaling that favors neither loud nor soft playing. You will need to experiment with this parameter to find exactly the right adjustment for your own touch.

PAGE 5 TRANSPOSE

This is the same Transpose setting you were introduced to in Part 3: First Session. The only difference is that in Global Edit Mode you make changes using the standard [EDIT VALUE] slider and [VALUE] buttons, not by pressing keys on the keyboard. The transposition range is from 12 to 12, which is the same as moving down or up by semitones over a two-octave range. It works by changing the MIDI Note Numbers assigned to the keyboard, thus changing the note data sent out from your QS6.1 when you play. So, if you want to play notes that are outside the QS6.1s normal 61-note range (MIDI Note Numbers 36-96), then by all means transpose! Taken down an octave, the keyboards range becomes MIDI Note Numbers 24-84; taken up an octave, it covers MIDI Note Numbers 48-108. This is very useful knowledge if you are using your QS6.1 to play music into a sequencer, since this parameter gives you two extra octaves of keyboard recording range.

PAGE 6 KEYBOARD MODE

There are three possible keyboard modes. Which one you want to use will depend on how you are using your QS6.1: NORMAL is the default setting. When NORMAL is selected, Program Mode receives and transmits over the MIDI channel indicated in the display. In Mix Mode, MIDI information is received over all active MIDI channels, but sent only from those displayed channels that have had MIDI OUT enabled. The MIDI Channel indicators in the lower line of the display will show which channels are active at any given time. CH SOLO changes the way the keyboard handles MIDI in Mix Mode (it has no effect on Program Mode). The simplest way to describe what it does is to say that it isolates individual channels in a Mix, allowing you to play only the selected channel (indicated by a flashing number in the display) from the keyboard, while ignoring all the Programs assigned to other channels. This is a great way, for example, to individually check out the different Programs that are in a layered Mix. And since CH SOLO has no effect on incoming MIDI data, its a great mode for sequencing. You can just move through your multi-timbral Mix one channel at a time, recording on single channels as you go while always hearing playback on everything that youve already laid down. (If youve selected CH SOLO, the [ PAGE] and [PAGE ] buttons are what youd use in Mix Mode to hear each channel in turn.) When using CH SOLO, make sure you turn off your sequencers ECHO function (sometimes called SOFT THRU or THRU). More about this sort of thing in Part 5: MIDI. Note: This mode is automatically selected by the QS6.1 when the General MIDI function is set to ON.

OUT 01 through OUT 16 select a single MIDI channel to transmit on, while simultaneously shutting off local keyboard control. Youll want to choose this setting if you are using a sequencer that automatically echoes back the MIDI data that is being recorded. (If your sequencer works that way and you dont choose one of the OUT settings, you will run out of available Voices faster as the echoed notes double what you are playing.)
Setting the Keyboard Mode to one of the OUT values is the QS6.1s equivalent to LOCAL OFF.

PAGE 7 GENERAL MIDI

This parameter turns General MIDI Mode on and off. Youll want to set it to ON if you are going to use your QS6.1 to play back sequences created specifically for use with a General MIDI module. Otherwise youll want to leave it alone. For more information about General MIDI, see the MIDI supplement in Part 10: Appendices. WARNING: Do not change this setting to ON unless you really mean to. Why? Because doing so will immediately take you out of Global Edit Mode, switch to Mix Mode, and call up the GM Multi Mix (Mix 00 in Preset Bank 4, which is the General MIDI Bank). This can be pretty darned confusing if you arent expecting it, but dont worry its easy to return to Global Edit Mode and set this parameter back to OFF. Some (but not all) General MIDI sequences will have a SysEx message at the beginning which tells the receiving device to go into General MIDI mode. The QS6.1 will respond to such a message. If one comes in, then your instrument will immediately jump from wherever it is to the GM Multi Mix. The General MIDI spec reserves MIDI Channel 10 for drumkits. Because of this, when the global General MIDI setting is ON, your QS6.1 wont be able to call up anything but drumkits on Channel 10 (from the front panel or via MIDI). Note: Turning General MIDI mode ON also automatically sets your Keyboard Mode to CH SOLO. Turning General MIDI off will put the Keyboard Mode back the way it was. Also, see the Note under Global Page 14.

PAGE 8 CONTROLLER A #

This parameter lets you select the MIDI Controller Number that will be assigned to the front panels [CONTROLLER A] slider. This is useful both for controlling external MIDI devices and for giving you sequencer-recordable control over a variety of Program and Effect parameters. The factory default is Controller 012. For a listing of all MIDI controllers and their designations, see the MIDI Supplement section of Part 10: Appendices.

SAVING PROGRAMS VIA MIDI S YS EX
As an alternative to storing data to a card, the QS6.1 lets you transmit internal data via the MIDI Output connector in the form of System Exclusive messages. This data can be sent to a storage device, or recorded into a MIDI sequencer, or sent to another QS6.1 or a QSR. You have a choice of sending any single Program in the User bank (00 to 127), or what is in the current Program Edit buffer, or what is in any of the 16 Mix Edit Program buffers, or the entire User bank (100 Mixes and 128 Programs, including their Effects Patches) plus Global data. In the case of sending data to another QS6.1, you can send any individual Program to the same location or any other location in the receiving QS6.1, including any of its 17 Program Edit buffers. To send the entire User bank via MIDI:
Connect a MIDI cable from the QS6.1s MIDI Out to the MIDI In of a device
capable of receiving the data (a MIDI sequencer, another QS6.1, etc.).

Press [STORE].

Press [PAGE
] six times to select the proper page of the Store function. The display will look like this:
Press [STORE] to transmit the data out the MIDI Out connector.
While transmitting the data, the display will temporarily read SENDING OUT MIDI DATA. To send a single Program via MIDI:
Follow steps and in the instructions above.
]seven times to select the proper page of the Store function. The display will look like this:
Use the [ CONTROLLER D] slider and the [VALUE] buttons to select a Program to
transmit. You may select any Program in the User bank (000 to 127) or the Program Edit buffer ( EDIT) or any of the 16 Mix Edit buffers (Em01 to Em16). As this value is changed, the second parameter (destination) will be linked. This is because most often you will want to transmit a Program to the same Program location. The only time to do otherwise is when sending to another QS6.1 (see below).
To send a single Program via MIDI to a different Program number:
Follow steps through in the instructions above.

the display.

] one more time to advance the cursor to the lower section of
Use the [ CONTROLLER D] slider and the [VALUE] buttons to select the Program
number to which you would like to send the Program.
The procedure is similar for sending Mixes. The next two pages of the Store function allow you to send any one of the Mixes to the same Mix location or the Mix Edit buffer in all the same ways to all the same types of devices. But keep in mind that just because youre storing a Mix to MIDI doesnt mean that all of the Programs are being taken with it. Its similar to having edited every single Program in the Mix as well as having edited the Mix. Youd have to individually store each of these to a location in the User bank or to a card, right? Its the same with sys-ex transfers. If you want that Mix to sound the same in someone elses QS6.1, youre going to need to send along the Programs out of which it was constructed. So depending on how customized the Programs are, it might make more sense to go ahead and use the SEND ALL TO MIDI command and give them the entire bank. But make sure s/he knows to back up his or her User bank before loading it in!

To pick a Configuration, enter Effects Edit Mode and then press [40], the button that has CONFIGURATION printed above it. The display will change to look like this:
Use the [v VALUE] and [VALUE w] buttons or the [EDIT VALUE] slider to select one of the five possible Configurations. As you scroll through the choices, each ones name will appear in the display.
CONFIGURATION #1: 1 REVERB
MAIN LEFT MAIN RIGHT MAIN LEFT MAIN RIGHT

FX SEND 1

PITCH 1

DELAY 1 1

REVERB 2 AMP

BAL. FX SEND 2 PITCH 2

DELAY 1

REVERB 1

DELAY 2 1

PITCH 2

BAL. FX SEND 3 PITCH 3

DELAY 2

REVERB 2

DELAY 3 1

PITCH 3

DELAY 3

REVERB 3

BAL. 1

FX SEND 4

DELAY 4

REVERB 4
Pitch 1 Mono Chorus Stereo Chorus Mono Flange Stereo Flange Pitch Detune Resonator
Delay 1 Mono Delay Stereo Delay Ping-pong Delay
Reverb 1 Plate 1 Plate 2 Room Hall Large Gate Reverse Reverb 2 Balance and Level to Reverb 1
Pitch 2 Mono Chorus Stereo Chorus Mono Flange Stereo Flange Pitch Detune Resonator Pitch 3 Mono Chorus Mono Flange Resonator
Delay 2 Mono Delay Stereo Delay Ping-pong Delay

Delay 3 Mono Delay

Reverb 3 Balance and Level to Reverb 1

Delay 4 Mono Delay

Reverb 4 Send/Delay Mix & Level to Reverb 1
At first glance this diagram may look a little daunting, but if you take a moment to trace the lines and read the component captions, things will become clear. Think of it as a kind of road map charting your audio signals progress from starting point through to its ultimate destination the [LEFT] and [RIGHT] outputs shown at the top of the page. 1) The dotted lines indicate the divisions between different functional blocks. 2) The solid lines indicate signal paths between the blocks and controls. 3) In general, signal flow moves from left to right. 4) The number next to each function name represents one of the four effect sends. For example, Delay 2 refers to the Delay effect on effect send 2.

HOW 1 REVERB IS ARRANGED

This Configuration provides three Pitch effects, four Delay effects, and one Reverb effect, arranged as follows: 1) Sends 1 and 2 can be stereo and have a selectable Pitch effect (Chorus, Flange, Pitch Detune, or Resonator) followed by a mono or stereo Delay effect. 1) Send 3 offers three possible Pitch effects (Mono Chorus, Mono Flange, or Resonator) followed by a mono Delay effect. 2) Send 4 is a mono Delay effect only. 3) The single Reverb effect is selected and set in Send 1. Reverb parameters that set the sound of the reverb itself (such as high and low decay, reverb type, predelay, etc.) are found only when Send1 is displayed. Within this limitation, however, there is still tremendous flexibility of Reverb routing and control on a per-Send basis: for example, each of the four Sends has its own controls for dry/wet ratio, and specific input point. (In Sends 1 through 3 you can take Reverb inputs from the Send input itself, the output of any Pitch effect, and the input or output of Delay effect, either individually or in any combination. In Send 4, the two possible inputs are the input and output of Delay 4.) 4) Each Pitch, Delay and Reverb module has its own independent Mix output level which controls how much signal is routed directly to the [LEFT MAIN] and [RIGHT MAIN] outputs. This Mix function is what you use to determine how much of each Effect component will be heard. Mix 1, for example, is where you control the outputs of Pitch 1, Delay 1, and Reverb 1 to the main outputs. The Mix parameter controls how much each Effect block feeds directly to the main outputs. It does not, however, control how much each block feeds to the blocks that follow it. For example, when Pitch 1s Mix control is set to 0, it is still fully available as an input to Delay 1 and Reverb 1.

CONFIGURATION #2: 2 REVERBS

DELAY AMP

PITCH AMP

REVERB

FX SEND 2 AMP

FX SEND 3

FX SEND 4 AMP

Delay 1 Mono Delay

Pitch 1 Mono Chorus Stereo Chorus

Pitch 3 Mono Chorus

Reverb 1 Plate 1 Plate 2 Room Hall Large Gate Reverse Reverb 2 Level to Reverb 1 Reverb 3 Plate 1 Plate 2 Room Hall Large Gate Reverse Reverb 4 Reverb 4 Level to Reverb 3
HOW 2 REVERBS IS ARRANGED
As you can see by glancing at the diagram, this Configuration differs considerably from the first! Here there are a single Delay, two Pitch effects, and two independent Reverb effects, arranged as follows: Send 1 is routed through a mono Delay, then a stereo Pitch effect, and finally a stereo Reverb effect. Send 2 has no effects of its own, but can be routed to the same Reverb effect as send 1 (if you wish). Send 3 is routed through a mono Pitch effect and then its own stereo Reverb effect. Send 4 has no effects of its own, but can be routed to the same Reverb effect as send 3 (thus echoing the relationship that Send 2 has with Send 1). The Delay, Pitch and Reverb outputs of Send 1 can be routed to the Mix control either singly or in any combination; while Send 2 is routed to the Mix only through the Reverb. Send 3 and Send 4 can be routed to their own separate Mix, but only through the second Reverb effect.
CONFIGURATION #3: LEZLIE+REVERB

LEZLIE

DELA 1 Y 1

DELA 2 Y

DELA 3 Y 1

DELA 4 Y

Pitch 1 Lezlie
Pitch 2 Mono Chorus Stereo Chorus Mono Flange Stereo Flange Pitch Detune Resonator Pitch 3 Resonator
Reverb 1 Plate 1 Plate 2 Hall Room Hall Large Gate Reverse Reverb 2 Balance and level to Reverb 1
Delay 3 Mono Delay Delay 4 Mono Delay
Reverb 3 Balance and level to Reverb 1 Reverb 4 Mix and level to Reverb 1
HOW LEZLIE+REVERB IS ARRANGED
This Configuration is structurally similar to Configuration #1. The big difference is that here the Pitch effect on Send 1 is a custom-designed stereo rotating speaker effect, and it is followed by a mono delay, not a stereo one.

Page 1

Pitch effects are achieved by splitting a signal into two parts, delaying and/or changing the pitch of one of the parts, and then mixing the two back together. This final mixing step is essential, since the overall sound of the effect is created in the way the changed and unchanged signals interact. Although some of these can sound quite similar, depending on their settings, each is achieved differently and will therefore be more (or less) useful depending on the circumstances. Following are some brief explanations which will help you make the choices that are best for your own music.
MONO CHORUS The Chorus effect is achieved by taking part of the signal and slightly delaying it, then slightly detuning it as well. This detuning is variable, not steady, because it is being modulated by an LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator). There are many possible adjustments in this algorithm. Some of the more interesting and useful ones include varying the LFO depth, varying the LFO speed, feeding a portion of the detuned signal back into its own input (thus increasing the effect), and changing the LFO waveform from a smooth triangle wave to a more abrupt square wave (causing the detuning to become more pronounced).

DELAY DRY SIGNAL

DETUNE CHORUSED OUTPUT

FEEDBACK DRY SIGNAL

STEREO CHORUS In a Stereo Chorus, the signal is split into three parts: a dry signal and separate left and right detunings. Whenever the left channel is detuned sharp, the right channel is automatically detuned flat, and vice versa. This causes the effect to become more pronounced and dramatic while keeping it in tune to the ear.

DRY SIGNAL FEEDBACK

LEFT CHORUSED OUTPUT

DETUNE

DRY SIGNAL
DETUNE RIGHT CHORUSED OUTPUT
MONO FLANGE First used in the 1960s, flanging was achieved by using two tape recorders to record and play back the same material at the same time. By alternately slowing down one tape machine, and then the other, an interesting phase cancellation could be generated. There is a much-repeated legend that this slowing down was done by pressing fingertips againsts the flanges of the tape supply reels, hence the effects name. But nobody actually knows for sure. Flanging is achieved by splitting a signal and giving one part of it a variable timedelay. (This is similar to Chorusing, except here we use the LFO to modulate delay time instead of pitch.) The delayed signal is then mixed back with the original sound to produce that well-known swooshing or doppler tunnel sound.

And again, as soon as you change a value, the word "EDIT" will change to "EDITED".
Now that were about to cover the various parameters in Program Edit mode, dont forget the Double-button push trick! This is where you push both of the [ VALUE ] buttons or both of the [ PAGE ] buttons at the same time as a shortcut. Youll find it detailed in Part 4: Basic Operation on page 33.
The Voice function (press [40]) is the most fundamental part of Program editing. It is where you choose the particular sample that forms the basis of a Sound. To avoid scrolling through long lists of samples (remember, there are 16 megabytes of sounds in here!), sounds are divided into groups. After selecting the group, you then select the sound within the group.

Sound Enable

This is the master on/off switch for the selected Sound (14) of the current Program. To avoid using up polyphony unnecessarily, set Sound Enable to OFF for any Sounds that will not be used in a Program. Turning Sounds off is also a convenient way to isolate a particular sound you are editing. When the Sound being edited is disabled, the upper line of the display will show the letters snd in lowercase letters. When the Sound being edited is enabled, the letters SND will appear in uppercase letters. The same thing happens when editing a Program from Mix Mode.
Muting and Unmuting Sounds. A quick way to turn a Sound on and off from anywhere within Program Edit Mode is to hold the corresponding Sound button [00][30] and press [ VALUE w] to disable or [ v VALUE ] to enable. Example: Holding [00] and pressing [ VALUE w] will disable Sound 1.

Sound Type

This determines whether a Sound layer is going to be in Keyboard Mode or Drum Mode. Drum Mode allows you to assign individual drum sounds to individual keys. To Program a Sound in Drum Mode, refer to the next section Programming Drum Sounds on page 149.

Sound Group (17 options)

Choose from among 17 different sample groups (see chart on the next page).
Selects one of the available samples by name from the selected group, or OFF (no sample selected). Each group has a variety of samples from which you can choose, although some groups (such as waves) have more samples than others. Below and on the following two pages, youll find a chart listing the various samples in their respective groups.
GrndPianoL, GrndPianoR, DarkPno1 L, DarkPno1 R, DarkPno2 L, DarkPno2 R, DarkPno3 L, DarkPno3 R, BritePno1L, BritePno1R, BritePno2L, BritePno2R, BritePno3L, BritePno3R, 4::VibesWave, NoHammer R, SoftPianoL, SoftPianoR, VeloPianoL, VeloPianoR, TapPiano L, TapPiano R, E Spinet 1, E Spinet 2, Toy Pno L, Toy Pno R, KeyTrack1, KeyTrack2, Stretch L, Stretch R, PianoWaveL, PianoWaveR, BriteRoads, Dark Roads, Soft Roads, VeloRoads1, VeloRoads2, VeloRoads3, Wurly, VeloWurly1, VeloWurly2, FM Piano, FM Tines, Soft Tines, VelAtkTine, Vel FM Pno, BrtRdsWave, DrkRdsWave, SftRdsWave, Wurly Wave Chromatic Clavinet, VelAtkClav, ClavntWave, Harpsicord, VAtkHarpsi, HarpsiWave, Glock, Xylophone, Marimba Hd, Marimba Sf, MarimbaVel, Vibraphone, VibesWave, Ice Block, Brake Drum, TubulrWave, TubWv/Null, FMTblrBell, FMTublrSft, FMTublrVel, FMTub/Null Rock Organ, Perc Organ, FullDrwbr1, FullDrwbr2, 3 Drawbars, 4 Drawbars, UpprDrwbrs, Organ 16'Drawbar, 5 1/3' bar, 8' Drawbar, 4' Drawbar, 2 2/3' bar, 2' Drawbar, 1 3/5' bar, 1 1/3' bar, 1' Drawbar, Percus 2nd, Percus 3rd, Percus Wav, HollowWave, 60's Combo, RotarySpkr, ChurchOrgn, Principale, Positive SteelStrng, NylonGuitr, Nylon/Harm, Nylon/Harp, JazzGuitar, SingleCoil, Sngle/Mute, Guitar DoubleCoil, DCoil/Harm, DCoil/Jazz, D/S Coil, MicroGuitr, PwrH/MGtr1, PwrH/MGtr2, MuteGuitar, Mute Velo, Metal Mute, MGtr/MtlMt, MtlMut/Hrm, Fuzz Wave, ClsHarmncs, ElecHarmnc, Pwr Harm 1, Pwr Harm 2, Pwr Harm 3, PwrHrmVel1, PwrHrmVel2, PwrHrmVel3 StudioBass, Studio&Hrm, Studio/Hrm, Slp/Studio, Slap Bass, Slap&Harm, Slap/Harm, Bass Slap/Pop, Pop/Slap, Bass Pop, Pop/Harm, Harm/Pop, JazzFingrd, Fingr&Harm, JazzPicked, Pickd&Harm, Jazz Velo, Muted Bass, Stik Bass, Stik&Harm, Stik/Harm, Harm/Stik, Fretless, Frtls&Harm, AcousBass1, AcoBs1&Hrm, AcousBass2, AcoBs2&Hrm, VelAcoBass, 3-VelBass1, 3-VelBass2, 3-VelBass3, 3-VelBass4, BassHarmnc StringEnsm, TapeStrngs, SoloString, SoloViolin, Solo Viola, Solo Cello, Contrabass, Pizz Sectn, String Pizz Split, Pizz/Strng, Strng/Pizz, StringAttk, Harp, Hi Bow, Low Bow Pop Brass, ClasclBras, AttakBrass, Trumpet, HarmonMute, Trombone, FrenchHorn, Bari Brass Horn, Tuba Wdwind Bassoon, Oboe, EnglishHrn, Clarinet, Bari Sax, BrthyTenor, Alto Sax, SopranoSax, Velo Sax, Flute, Flute Wave, Shakuhachi, PanPipe Hd, PanPipe Md, PanPipe Sf, PanPipeVel, Pan Wave, BottleBlow, BottleWave J Pad, M Pad, X Pad, Velo Pad 1, Velo Pad 2, Velo Pad 3, AcidSweep1, AcidSweep2, Synth AcidSweep3, AcidSweep4, AcidSweep5, VeloAcid 1, VeloAcid 2, VeloAcid 3, VeloAcid 4, Chirp Rez1, Chirp Rez2, Chirp RezV, Quack Rez1, Quack Rez2, Quack Rez3, Quack Rez4, QuackRezV1, QuackRezV2, QuackRezV3, Uni Rez 1, Uni Rez 2, Uni Rez 3, Uni Rez V, AnalogSqr1, AnalogSqr2, AnalogSqrV, SyncLead 1, SyncLead 2, SyncLead V, Seq Bass, Seq BassV1, Seq BassV2, FatSynBass, TranceBas1, TranceBas2, VeloTrance, FunkSynBs1, FunkSynBs2, FunkSynBs3, FunkSynBsV, FilterBass, FM Bass, FM/FiltVel, Soft Chirp, Soft Rez Pure Sine, 10% Pulse, 20% Pulse, 50% Pulse, Velo Pulse, Mini Saw, Saw Fltr 1, Saw Fltr 2, Saw Wave Fltr 3, Saw Fltr 4, Saw Fltr 5, Saw Fltr 6, Saw Fltr 7, RezSaw UK, RezSaw USA, Acid Saw, Velo Saw 1, Velo Saw 2, Velo Saw 3, Velo Saw 4, Velo Saw 5, Velo Saw 6, AcidRezSqr, VelAcidWav, MiniSquare, Sqr Fltr 1, Sqr Fltr 2, VeloSquare, Mini Tri, Tri Filter, Velo Tri, Rectanglar, Hard Sync, HSync/Rect, BrightSync, Rez Sync, Ring Mod, RingMod V1, RingMod V2, OctaveLock, Diet Saw, Band Saw, Notch Saw, HiPassSaw1, HiPassSaw2, HiPassSaw3, HiPassSaw4, HiPassVel1, HiPassVel2, HiPassVel3, HiPassVel4, HiPassVel5, HiPassVel6, Cognitive, Additive 1, Additive 2, VeloAdditv, Digital 1, Digital 2, Digital 3, Digital 4, Science 1, Science 2, Science 3, Science 4, VelScience, Metal Wave, Inharmonc1, Inharmonc2 WhiteNoise, Spectral, Crickets, Rain Noise, FiltrNoise, ShapeNoise, VeloNoise1, VeloNoise2, Noise VeloNoise3, NoiseLoop1, NoiseLoop2, NoiseLoop3, NoiseLoop4, NoiseLoop5 VocalAhhs, Soft Ahhs, Ahhs Wave, VocalOohs, Soft Oohs, Oohs/Ahhs, Ahhs/Oohs, Whistle, Voice Phonic

Velocity (-99 to +99)

At +00, velocity has no effect on the filter cutoff. With positive values, playing harder increases the filter cutoff. More positive values drive the cutoff frequency higher for a given amount of velocity. More negative values drive the cutoff frequency lower for a given amount of velocity. acoustic instruments, such as when TIP: Manymore forcefully. Adding a littleacoustic guitars, sound brighterthe filteryou play them positive velocity control over can simulate more realistic acoustic sounds.
Modulation Wheel Depth (-99 to +99)
Determines how moving the modulation wheel affects the filter cutoff frequency. Example: With positive settings, moving the modulation wheel up raises the filter cutoff frequency and moving it down lowers the filter cutoff frequency. With negative settings, moving the modulation wheel up lowers the filter cutoff frequency and moving it down raises the filter cutoff frequency.
At +00, aftertouch has no effect on the filter cutoff frequency. Applying aftertouch with this parameter set to a positive value raises the filter cutoff frequency; conversely, applying aftertouch with a negative value lowers the filter cutoff frequency. The higher the number (either positive or negative), the greater the effect for a given amount of aftertouch. as you TIP: Many acoustic instruments sound brighterharder. play them more forcefully; ina particular, brass gets brighter as you blow Using aftertouch to increase sounds brightness can give more control and realism with acoustic instruments.
Filter LFO Depth (-99 to +99)
At +00, the filter LFO has no effect. Higher positive values increase the amount of filter LFO modulation. Negative values give the same apparent effect, but with reversed LFO phase (i.e., if the filter cutoff frequency would normally be increasing with depth set to a positive number, the cutoff would instead be decreasing at that same moment had the depth been set to a negative number). Filter LFO parameters (such as speed and wave shape) are programmed from within the Filter LFO Function on button [7] (see page 144). Note: If you hear no change when you alter this parameter, spend some time experimenting with the Filter LFO Functions on button [7]. Another note: If your Filter LFO is using the Square, Up Saw, Down Saw, or Random+ waveshapes, you may get a more pronounced effect if you use a negative setting for Filter LFO Depth. See page 142 for more information about the various LFO waveshapes.

vibrato. However it is also well-suited to controlling timbre, vibrato speed, and many other parameters. Pitch Wheel The leftmost wheel, Pitch, usually controls the oscillator pitch but can be tied to other parameters as well. MIDI Volume MIDI can produce a variety of controller messages (see the MIDI supplement in the back of this manual). Of these, controller #7, which controls channel volume, is one of the most frequently used. Example: Assign the filter cutoff as the destination, and you can have the signal become less bright as it becomes lower in volume. Sustain Pedal The sustain switch plugged into the sustain pedal jack provides this modulation signal. Pedal 1 The default setting assigns Pedal 1 to MIDI Controller 7 to act as a volume pedal. But it can also be assigned to any other incoming MIDI controller number (Global Edit Mode, page 12) and routed to any destination in the Mod section. Pedal 2 There is no Pedal 2 jack on the QS6.1, but it is still available in the Global section as an assignable controller (Global Edit Mode, page 13). This parameter is what enables you to select that incoming MIDI controller as a source for modulation. Pitch LFO/Filter LFO/Amplitude LFO: You can select the LFOs as modulation sources, even if they aren't being used to affect the Sound in their usual ways. Once selected, you can route them to affect some unusual things -- like eachother! Any item on the Destination list is fair game. Pitch Envelope/Filter Envelope/Amplitude Envelope: These can also be selected as modulation sources. Try routing them to LFO speeds or the Effect Send Level of a Sound, or whatever you can think up! Random This provides a different modulation value every time you hit a key. Example: With vintage analog synth patches, use pitch as the destination and apply a very slight amount of random modulation. Each note will have a slightly different pitch, which simulates the natural tuning instability of analog circuits. Trigrate This is a Trigger Rate Follower, which monitors how fast notes are being played on the keyboard. For example, if routed to the Effect send of a Program, you could automatically have more effect when playing slowly, and less effect when playing quickly (or vice versa). Controllers (A, B, C, D) Four incoming MIDI controllers can be recognized by the QS6.1 and used as modulation sources. These controllers are assigned as AD in Global Edit Mode (pages 8-11). In Program Play and Mix Play Modes, the CONTROLLER [A], [B], [C] and [D] sliders serve the same purpose. Tracking Generator This accepts the output of a signal processed by the Tracking Generator module (see page 147). Stepped Tracking Generator This accepts the output of a signal processed by the Tracking Generator module in stepped mode (see page 148).

LINEAR

0 POINTS: 9 10

NON-LINEAR

0 POINTS: 10

NON-LINEAR STEPPED

The Tracking Generator can be used to turn a variable control, such as the Mod Wheel or velocity, into a switch by setting all of the points to 0 except for point 10. Only near the maximum input will anything other than 0 come out of the Tracking generator. You can patch the Mod Wheel somewhere else in addition to the Tracking Generator, giving you gradual control of one function with the full range of the Mod Wheel, while switching on a second function only at the top of the wheel.

Tracking Input

Select the input of the Tracking Generator from the following sources: Note Number Velocity Release Velocity Aftertouch Poly Pressure Mod Wheel Pitch Wheel MIDI Volume Sustain Pedal Pedal 1 Pedal 2 Pitch LFO Filter LFO Amp LFO Pitch Envelope
Filter Envelope Amp Envelope Random Trig Rate Controllers AD
For detailed descriptions of each of these sources, see the section Modulation Source in the Mod section on pages 138-139.

Tracking Points (00100)

Pages 212
The remaining pages of the TRACK function control the levels of points 010. Select the various Points with the [PAGE] buttons, and change the values in the usual ways. A higher number increases the impact that Point will have on whatever the Mod destination is.
So now that you understand the Tracking Generator a little better, why not try setting up your own velocity curve? Use the TIP at the bottom of the Velocity Curve section as your guide (see page 124).
PROGRAMMING DRUM SOUNDS IN DRUM MODE
To program a sound in Drum Mode, you must first set the Sound Type to Drum for that particular Sound in the Voice Function, page 2 (see page 114). The [0] [9] buttons are used to select a Drum (110), regardless of which Function or Page is selected. For an explanation of the basics of Drum Mode, see page ??53.
Heres a quick way to select the Drum youd like to edit: If it is on Sound 1, hold down the [00] button and hit the key the Drum is on. If the Drum is on Sound 3, use the [30] button and hit the key.
The Voice function (press [40]) is where you choose the particular sample for the selected Drum (110). Similar to the normal Assign Voice function, sounds are divided into groups. After selecting the group (on page 3), you then select the sample within the group (on page 4). Here is a chart listing the various drum samples in their respective groups.

GENERAL MIDI

General MIDI (GM) is an extension of the MIDI standard designed to meet the demands of the ever-growing multimedia industry, and to make simple the act of playing commercially-produced MIDI sequences. The GM standard utilizes all 16 channels available in MIDI. The QS6.1 is a perfect General MIDI companion, since its Mix Mode uses 16 channels. Although many channels are commonly used for specific types of instruments (Example: Channel 1 is usually piano, channel 2 is usually bass, etc.), channel 10 is always used for drums. General MIDI also standardizes the placement of sound types in a sound devices memory bank. The QS6.1s GenMIDI Bank is designed specifically for General MIDI, and organizes its sounds according to the GM specification. This means that when a sequencer sends a MIDI program change message that is supposed to call up a particular sound, the correct sound will be there on the QS6.1, even if the composer of the sequence used a different sound device. The Programs in the GenMIDI Bank use the standard General MIDI names, which is handy because many commerciallyavailable GM sequences have the names of the instruments used in the songs stored with the track data.
There are three MIDI registered parameter numbers (RPNs) which the QS6.1 will recognize in Mix Play Mode when General MIDI Mode is enabled. These are: MIDI Registered Parameter 0 (Pitch Bend Sensitivity): This will directly affect the Pitch Wheel Range parameter of all four Sounds of the Program on the received MIDI Channel of the Mix. If the Channel which received the RPN is selected using the [ PAGE] and [PAGE ] buttons, the word EDITED will appear next to the word MIXPROG in the lower part of the display. However, if you are viewing the Pitch Wheel Range parameter in the display (Mix Program Edit Mode, Pitch Function, Page 4) when the RPN arrives, the display will not be updated to reflect the new setting. But if you go to another Page or Function and then return, the display will reflect the updated setting.

Mod Mod Mod Mod Mod Name Level Level Pitch Pitch ENV Pitch ENV Pitch ENV Pitch LFO Pitch Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch Pitch Pitch Amp/Range Amp/Range Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Voice Amp/Range Voice Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Track Gen Track Gen Pitch Pitch Pitch

1 n/a 2 3

Velocity Velocity Curve/Crossfade Sound Group Sound Name Sound Volume
Filter Amp/Range Voice Voice Level

MIX EDIT PARAMETERS

Aftertouch Controllers AD Effect Channel Effect MIDI Program Change Keyboard On/Off MIDI In MIDI Out Name Pitchbend and Mod Wheels Program Effect Bus Program Effect Level Program Enable Program Output Program Pan Program Volume Range Lower Limit Range Upper Limit Sustain Pedal Tuning: Octave Tuning: Semitone
Controllers Controllers Effect Effect Keyboard/MIDI Keyboard/MIDI Keyboard/MIDI Name Controllers Level Level Level Level Level Level Range Range Controllers Pitch Pitch

2 n/a 1 2

doc1

Appendix A Trouble-Shooting
PART 10: A PPENDICES APPENDIX A

TROUBLESHOOTING

If you experience problems while operating your QS6.1, please use the following table to check for possible causes and solutions before contacting Alesis customer service for assistance. Some of them may seem rather obvious, but youd be amazed at how easy it can be to overlook the basics.

Symptom

The display does not light up when the ON/OFF switch is turned on. No sound.

No power.

Solution
Check that the power cable is plugged in properly. Check your audio cables; if necessary, swap cables. Raise the [VOLUME] slider or Pedal 1. Set the Keyboard Mode to NORMAL (Global Editing, display page 6).
Bad connections. Volume is turned down. Keyboard Mode is set incorrectly.
MIDI input in Mix mode isnt working (i.e., you cant control your unit via MIDI from a sequencer or some other controller).
External MIDI device sent Volume (CC#7) or Expression (CC#11) commands with a value approaching 0. Bad connections. MIDI IN is switched off for one or more channels.
Keyboard Play Mode is set incorrectly. Serial port enabled.
Notes sustain continuously.
Sustain pedal was plugged in after power was turned on. Stuck notes due to incomplete MIDI data.
Switch QS6.1 from Mix Mode to Program Mode or vice versa. Re-transmit higher values from MIDI device. Check MIDI cables. Make sure the MIDI IN parameter is turned on for the channel(s) you wish to control via MIDI. Set the Keyboard to Mix Play Mode (push Mix button. Set I/O parameter to MIDI (Global Edit Mode, page 15). Turn the units power off, wait a moment, and then turn it on again.
Notes played from QS6.1 have a doubled or flanged sound
Switch QS6.1 from Mix Mode to Program Mode or vice versa. MIDI echo/Thru enabled Disable MIDI echo/Thru on external MIDI device on external MIDI device or computer

QS6.1 Reference Manual

Mod Wheel not working well (or at all) QS6.1 behaving erratically
Unit was re-initialized with Mod Wheel up Serial port enabled, no computer or other QS hooked to it Bad Sys-ex data sent to QS6.1 via MIDI input

LCD shows ADDRESS ERROR

Put QS6.1 into Out 01 mode (Global Edit Mode, page 6) Put Mod Wheel all the way down and re-initialize Set I/O parameter to MIDI (Global Edit Mode, page 15) Re-initialize (see below) If its making cool noises, record it. Then re-initialize.

RECOVERING FROM A C RASH

If your QS6.1 behaves erratically or freezes on you, the first thing to try is to switch between Mix and Program modes once. If that doesnt do anything, turn it off, wait for a moment, and then turn it on again. WARNING make sure you turn off any amplification first! If your instrument still isnt working after that, then disconnect the [MIDI IN] cable and repeat the power on/off trick. This ought to work if your problem is being caused by strange MIDI data coming from an external MIDI device. If neither of these work, you will have to re-initialize the instrument.

RE-INITIALIZING

Re-initializing your QS6.1s software is strong medicine. It is guaranteed to return the instrument to operational status. Unfortunately, it will also reset all Global parameters to their factory default settings and empty out the edit buffers, thus losing any unsaved changes you may have made to a Program or Mix. So it isnt something to be done unless you really need to. (The User Bank will remain untouched, though all the Programs, Mixes, and Effects stored there will come through the re-initialization just fine.) Heres how to do it: 1) Turn down the volume on your QS6.1, your mixer, and your amplifier. If you ever forget to do this while re-initializing, youll know why we said this first. 2) Make sure the [MODULATION] wheel is all the way down. (If it isnt, then its current position will become what the QS6.1 recognizes as zero after reinitialization is complete, and youll no longer have the full range of possible modulation control.) 3) Turn off the power on your QS6.1. 4) Hold down buttons [0] and [3] at the same time. 5) While holding them down, turn the power back on. Youll know you were successful if A) there is no name in the LCD display on the top line, and B) the problem is gone! 6) Remember to go back into Global Edit mode and set up things the way you had them (things like the Keyboard Mode, Transposition, the A-D MIDI controller number assignments, etc.). 164 QS6.1 Reference Manual

CHECKING THE SOFTWARE V ERSION
To find out what version of the operating system software is currently installed in your QS6.1, hold down [PROGRAM] and [0] at the same time and look in the display.

MAINTENANCE /S ERVICE

CLEANING YOUR QS6.1
Before doing cleaning of any kind, always disconnect the AC cord. For simple dusting and removal of minor dirt, wipe the instrument down with a slightly-damp cloth. For heavy dirt, use a non-abrasive household cleaner such as Formula 409 or Fantastik. Spray the cleanser onto a cloth, then use the cloth to clean the unit. NEVER spray any cleaner directly onto the QS6.1 this can destroy the lubricants used in the switches and controls!

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE

Periodically check the AC cord for signs of fraying or damage. Make sure the entire bottom surface of the keyboard is supported, so the rest of the unit is not subjected to unnecessary bending. Place a dust cover over the QS6.1 when it is not in use.
REFER ALL SERVICING TO ALESIS
The QS6.1 is one of the most reliable keyboards that can be made using current technology, and should provide years of trouble-free use. If problems should occur, however, Do NOT attempt to service the unit yourself. THIS WOULD BE DANGEROUS, thanks to high-level AC and DC electrical voltages present in the instruments chassis. Service on this product should be performed only by qualified technicians. THERE ARE NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE.

OBTAINING REPAIR SERVICE

Before contacting Alesis, please double-check all your audio and MIDI connections, and make sure youve read the manual. U.S. Customers: If the problem persists, call Alesis USA at 1-800-525-3747 (1-800-5ALESIS) and request the Product Support department. Or you can e-mail Product Support at Support@alesis1.usa.com. Discuss the problem with one of our technicians; if necessary, you will be given a repair order (RO) number and instructions on how to return the unit. All units must be shipped prepaid and COD shipments will not be accepted. For prompt service, indicate the RO number on the shipping label. If you do not have the original packing materials, ship the QS6.1 in a sturdy carton, with shockabsorbing materials surrounding the unit. Bubble-pack works well, as will any styrofoam pellets that dont contain CFCs. PROPER PACKAGING IS IMPORTANT: Shipping damage caused by inadequate packing is not covered by the Alesis warranty. Before sealing the box, tape a note containing the following items to the top of the defective unit: A description of the problem. Your name. Your phone number (and e-mail, if you have it). The address where you want the product returned. (Alesis will pay for standard one-way return shipping on any warranty repairs. Next day service is available for a surcharge.)

Field repairs are not normally authorized during the warranty period, and repair attempts by unqualified personnel may invalidate the warranty. Service address for customers in the USA: Alesis Service Department 12520 Wilkie Ave. Hawthorne, CA 90250
Customers outside the USA: Contact your local Alesis dealer for warranty assistance. The Alesis Limited Warranty applies only to products sold to users in the USA and Canada. Customers outside of the USA and Canada are not covered by this Limited Warranty and may or may not be covered by an independent distributor warranty in the country of sale. Do not return products to the factory unless you have been given specific instructions to do so.
Appendix B MIDI Supplement

APPENDIX B

MIDI SUPPLEMENT

MIDI B ASICS

Most current electronic instruments and signal processors, including the QS6.1, contain an internal computer. Computers and music have been working together for decades, which is not surprising considering musics mathematical basis (consider frequencies, harmonics, vibrato rates, tunings, etc.). In the mid-70s, microcomputers became inexpensive enough to be built into consumer-priced musical instruments. They were used for everything from sound generation to storing parameters in memory for later recall. In 1983, the MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) specification was introduced to better exploit the computers inside these new musical instruments, primarily to ensure compatibility of equipment between manufacturers. MIDI expresses musical events (notes played, vibrato, dynamics, tempo, etc.) as a common language consisting of standardized digital data. This data can be understood by MIDIcompatible computers and computer-based musical instruments. Before electronics, music was expressed exclusively as written symbols. By translating musical parameters into digital data, MIDI can express not only the types of musical events written into sheet music, but other parameters as well (such as amount of pitch bend or degree of vibrato).

MIDI H ARDWARE

MIDI-compatible devices usually include both MIDI In and MIDI Out jacks, which terminate in 5-pin DIN-style connectors. The MIDI Out jack transmits MIDI data to another MIDI device. As you play a MIDI controller such as a keyboard, data corresponding to what you play exits the MIDI Out jack. Example: If you play middle C, the MIDI Out transmits a piece of data that says middle C is down. If you release that key, the MIDI Out transmits another piece of data that says middle C has been released. If the keyboard responds to the dynamics of your playing (as your QS6.1 does), the note data will include dynamics information too. Moving the modulation wheels and pedals attached to many synthesizers will also generate data associated with those wheels and pedals. The MIDI In jack receives data from another MIDI device. In addition to the type of performance data described above, rhythmically-oriented MIDI devices (e.g., drum machines) can often transmit and/or receive additional MIDI timing messages that keep other rhythmically-oriented units in a system synchronized with each other. An optional MIDI Thru jack provides a duplicate of the signal at the MIDI In jack. This is handy if you want to route MIDI data appearing at one device to another device as well.

Appendix B: MIDI Supplement

MIDI M ESSAGE BASICS

The are two main types of MIDI messages. Channel messages, which are channelspecific, consist of Voice and Mode messages. System messages, which do not have a channel number and are received by all units in a system, include Common, Real Time, and Exclusive messages.
CHANNEL MESSAGES: MODE MESSAGES
There are two messages that determine the MIDI mode (i.e., how a device will receive MIDI data). The Omni message determines how many channels will be recognized. Omni On means that data from all channels will be received; Omni Off limits the number of channels, usually to one. The Mono/Poly message deals with voice assignment within the synthesizer. In Mono mode, only one note at a time plays in response to voice messages; in Poly mode, as many voices can play notes as are available to play notes.
CHANNEL MESSAGES: VOICE MESSAGES
A synthesizers voice is the most basic unit of sound generation. Usually, each voice plays one note at a time, so the number of notes you can play at one time will be limited by the available number of voices. MIDI messages that affect voices include: Note On. Corresponds to a key being pressed down; values range from 000 (lowest note) to 127 (highest note). Middle C is 60. Note Off. Corresponds to a key being released; values are the same as Note On. Velocity. Corresponds to dynamics; values range from 001 (minimum velocity) to 127 (maximum velocity). A velocity of 000 is equivalent to a Note Off message. Pressure. Indicates the pressure applied to a keyboard after pressing a key. Mono pressure (Aftertouch) represents the average amount of pressure applied by all keys. Poly Pressure produces individual pressure messages for each key. Program Change. Sending a Program Change command from a sequencer or other MIDI keyboard can change synth patches automatically. There are 128 Program Change command numbers. Also note that not all units number programs consistently. Some number them as 000-127, others as 001-128, and still others arrange programs in banks of 8 programs (such as A1-A8, B1-B8, C1-C8, etc.). Pitch Bend. This bends a note from its standard pitch. Continuous Controllers. This term is sometimes abbreviated CC and is followed by a number sign and a number, as in CC #7. If you look at the chart on the next page, youll see that Continuous Controller # 7 controls MIDI (or Main) Volume. (What we mean by continuous is able to go from 0 to 127 in increments of 1.) On the next page, youll find out what they do.

Footpedals, breath controllers, and modulation wheels can vary sounds as you play, thus adding expressiveness. MIDI allows for 64 continuous controllers and 58 continuous/switch controllers (which can act like continuous controllers, but some are assumed to choose between two possible states, such as on/off). Each type of controller is stamped with its own controller identification number. Not all controller numbers have been standardized for specific functions, but the following indicates the current list of assigned controllers. Numbers in parentheses indicate the controller range. # 19 32-Function Bank Select (0-127) Modulation Wheel (0-127) Breath Controller (0-127) Early DX7 Aftertouch (0-127) Foot Controller (0-127) Portamento Time (0-127) Data Slider (0-127) Main Volume (0-127) Balance (0-127) Pan (0-127) Expression (0-127) General Purpose #1 (0-127) General Purpose #2 (0-127) General Purpose #3 (0-127) General Purpose #4 (0-127) Least Significant Bits (LSB), Controllers 0-31 (0-127) Sustain Pedal (0 or 127) Portamento On/Off (0 or 127) Sostenuto Pedal (0 or 127) Soft Pedal (0 or 127) Hold 2 (0 or 127) General Purpose #5 (0 or 127) General Purpose #6 (0 or 127) General Purpose #7 (0 or 127) General Purpose #8 (0 or 127) Reverb Depth (0-127) Tremolo Depth (0-127) Chorus Depth (0-127) Celeste Depth (0-127) Phase Depth (0-127) Data Increment (0 or 127) Data Decrement (0 or 127) Non-Registered Parameter MSB (0-127) Non-Registered Parameter LSB (0-127) Registered Parameter MSB (0-127) Registered Parameter LSB (0-127) Reset All Controllers (0) Local Control On/Off (0 or 127) All Notes Off (0) Omni Off (0) Omni On (0) Mono On (0-16; 0=Omni Off) Poly On (0)

SYSTEM COMMON MESSAGES

Intended for all units in a system, some of these MIDI messages are: Song Position Pointer. This indicates how many MIDI beats (normally a 16th note) have elapsed since a piece started (up to 16,384 total beats). It is primarily used to allow different sequencers and drum machines to auto-locate to each other so that if you start one sequencer, the other device will automatically jump to the same place in the song, whereupon both continue on together. System Exclusive. This message (called Sys-ex for short) is considered exclusive because different manufacturers send and receive data over MIDI which is intended only for that manufacturers equipment. Example: Sending a QS6.1 message to an Alesis DMPro Drum Module wont do anything, but the message will be understood by another QS6.1. This data often contains information about individual instrument programs. Timing Clock. A master tempo source (such as a sequencer) emits 24 timing messages (clocks) per quarter note. Each device synchronized to the sequencer advances by 1/24th of a quarter note when it receives the clock message, thus keeping units in sync after theyve both started at the same time. Many devices subdivide this clock signal internally for higher resolution (e.g., 96 pulses per quarter note). Start. Signals all rhythmically-based units when to start playing. Stop. Signals all rhythmically-based units when to stop playing. Continue. Unlike a Start command, which re-starts a sequencer or drum machine from the beginning of a song each time it occurs, sending a Continue message after a Stop command will re-start units from where they were when they stopped.

GENERAL MIDI

General MIDI (GM) is an extension of the MIDI standard designed to meet the demands of the ever-growing multimedia industry, and to make simple the act of playing commercially-produced MIDI sequences. The GM standard utilizes all 16 channels available in MIDI. The QS6.1 is a perfect General MIDI companion, since its Mix Mode uses 16 channels. Although many channels are commonly used for specific types of instruments (Example: Channel 1 is usually piano, channel 2 is usually bass, etc.), channel 10 is always used for drums. General MIDI also standardizes the placement of sound types in a sound devices memory bank. The QS6.1s GenMIDI Bank is designed specifically for General MIDI, and organizes its sounds according to the GM specification. This means that when a sequencer sends a MIDI program change message that is supposed to call up a particular sound, the correct sound will be there on the QS6.1, even if the composer of the sequence used a different sound device. The Programs in the GenMIDI Bank use the standard General MIDI names, which is handy because many commerciallyavailable GM sequences have the names of the instruments used in the songs stored with the track data.
There are three MIDI registered parameter numbers (RPNs) which the QS6.1 will recognize in Mix Play Mode when General MIDI Mode is enabled. These are: MIDI Registered Parameter 0 (Pitch Bend Sensitivity): This will directly affect the Pitch Wheel Range parameter of all four Sounds of the Program on the received MIDI Channel of the Mix. If the Channel which received the RPN is selected using the [ PAGE] and [PAGE ] buttons, the word EDITED will appear next to the word MIXPROG in the lower part of the display. However, if you are viewing the Pitch Wheel Range parameter in the display (Mix Program Edit Mode, Pitch Function, Page 4) when the RPN arrives, the display will not be updated to reflect the new setting. But if you go to another Page or Function and then return, the display will reflect the updated setting.
MIDI Registered Parameter 1 (Fine Tune): This will directly effect the Pitch Detune parameter of all four Sounds of the Program on the received MIDI Channel of the Mix. Also, when this RPN is received, the QS6.1 will automatically make sure that all four Sounds of the Program have their Detune Type parameter set to Normal (Program Edit Mode, Pitch Function, Page 3). If the Channel which received the RPN is selected using the [ PAGE] and [PAGE ] buttons, the word EDITED will appear next to the word MIXPROG in the lower part of the display. However, if you are viewing the Detune Amount parameter in the display (Program Edit Mode, Pitch Function, Page 2) when the RPN arrives, the display will not be updated to reflect the new setting. But if you go to another Page or Function and then return, the display will reflect the updated setting. MIDI Registered Parameter 2 (Coarse Tune):This will directly effect the Pitch Semitone parameter of all four Sounds of the Program on the received MIDI Channel of the Mix. If the Channel which received the RPN is selected using the [ PAGE] and [ PAGE ] buttons, the word EDITED will appear next to the word MIXPROG in the lower part of the display. However, if you are viewing the Tune Semitone parameter in the display (Program Edit Mode, Pitch Function, Page 1) when the RPN arrives, the display will not be updated to reflect the new setting. But if you go to another Page or Function and then return, the display will reflect the new setting.

(Portions of this appendix are abridged versions of material from Power Sequencing with Master Tracks Pro/Pro 4 and The Complete Guide to the Alesis HR-16 and MMT-8 , copyright 1990 and 1989 respectively by AMSCO Publications, and are adapted with permission.)
MIDI Implementation Chart
MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART

Function

Basic Channel Mode Note Number Velocity Default Changed Default Messages Altered True Voice Note On Note Off Keys Chs

Transmitted

each Mode 3 X

Recognized

each Mode 3 X O O O O O O O127 O X X X X X O2 O X O2 O

Remarks

Memorized

********

After Touch Pitch Bender Control Change Prog Change True #

O O X O O O O127

O X X X X X X X X X X
System Exclusive System Song Pos Common Song Sel Tune System Clock Realtime Commands Aux Local On/Off Messages All Notes Off Active Sense Reset GM On Notes
1 O, X is selectable 2 Recognized as ALL NOTES OFF
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY Mode 1: OMNI ON, MONO
Mode 3: OMNI OFF, POLY Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO

O : Yes X : No

Appendix C Parameters Index

APPENDIX C

PARAMETERS INDEX

PROGRAM EDIT PARAMETERS

Parameter
Aftertouch Depth: Amp Aftertouch Depth: ALFO Aftertouch Depth: Filter Aftertouch Depth: FLFO Aftertouch Depth: Pitch Aftertouch Depth: PLFO Amp ENV Level Amp ENV Trigger Mode Amp LFO Delay Amp LFO Depth Amp LFO Level Amp LFO Mod. Wheel Level Amp LFO Speed Amp LFO Trigger Mode Amp LFO Waveform Attack: Amp Attack: Filter Attack: Pitch Decay: Amp Decay: Filter Decay: Pitch Effect Bus Effect Level Filter ENV Depth Filter ENV Level Filter ENV Trigger Mode Filter ENV Velocity Depth Filter Frequency Filter Keyboard Tracking Filter LFO Delay Filter LFO Depth Filter LFO Level Filter LFO Mod. Wheel Level Filter LFO Speed Filter LFO Trigger Mode Filter LFO Waveform Keyboard Mode Mod. Wheel Level: Amp LFO Mod. Wheel Level: Filter Mod. Wheel Level: Filter LFO
Amp/Range Amp LFO Filter Filter LFO Pitch Pitch LFO Amp ENV Amp ENV Amp LFO Amp/Range Amp LFO Amp LFO Amp LFO Amp LFO Amp LFO Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Level Level Filter Filter ENV Filter ENV Filter ENV Filter Filter Filter LFO Filter Filter LFO Filter LFO Filter LFO Filter LFO Filter LFO Pitch Amp LFO Filter Filter LFO

Display Page

Modulation Destination Modulation: Gate Mode Modulation Level Modulation: Quantize Mode Modulation Source Name (Program) Output Pan Pitch ENV Depth Pitch ENV Level Pitch ENV Trigger Mode Pitch ENV Velocity Depth Pitch LFO Delay Pitch LFO Depth Pitch LFO Level Pitch LFO Mod. Wheel Level Pitch LFO Speed Pitch LFO Trigger Mode Pitch LFO Waveform Pitch Wheel Range: Pitch Portamento Type Portamento Rate Range Lower Limit Range Upper Limit Release: Amp Release: Filter Release: Pitch Sound Enable Sound Overlap Sound Type Sustain: Amp Sustain: Filter Sustain: Pitch Sustain Decay: Amp Sustain Decay: Filter Sustain Decay: Pitch Sustain Pedal: Amp Sustain Pedal: Filter Sustain Pedal: Pitch Time Track: Amp ENV Time Track: Filter ENV Time Track: Pitch ENV Track Input Track Points (010) Tuning: Semitone Tuning: Detune Tuning: Type
Mod Mod Mod Mod Mod Name Level Level Pitch Pitch ENV Pitch ENV Pitch ENV Pitch LFO Pitch Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch LFO Pitch Pitch Pitch Amp/Range Amp/Range Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Voice Amp/Range Voice Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Amp ENV Filter ENV Pitch ENV Track Gen Track Gen Pitch Pitch Pitch

1 n/a 2 3

Velocity Velocity Curve/Crossfade Sound Group Sound Name Sound Volume
Filter Amp/Range Voice Voice Level

MIX EDIT PARAMETERS

Aftertouch Controllers AD Effect Channel Effect MIDI Program Change Keyboard On/Off MIDI In MIDI Out Name Pitchbend and Mod Wheels Program Effect Bus Program Effect Level Program Enable Program Output Program Pan Program Volume Range Lower Limit Range Upper Limit Sustain Pedal Tuning: Octave Tuning: Semitone
Controllers Controllers Effect Effect Keyboard/MIDI Keyboard/MIDI Keyboard/MIDI Name Controllers Level Level Level Level Level Level Range Range Controllers Pitch Pitch

2 n/a 1 2

 

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