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Bolex H16 Reflex

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Bolex H16 Reflex with Pizar 25mm RX tested with film at all speeds

 

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Comments to date: 7. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
macster 7:00pm on Monday, October 11th, 2010 
Canon has done it again. The best camera in its category. Tthis camera is a must have upgrade, but definitely not for the wedding photographers. Canon has done it again. The best camera in its category. Tthis camera is a must have upgrade, but definitely not for the wedding photographers.
PVSTA 11:33pm on Saturday, October 2nd, 2010 
15 years of shooting Canon and they blew me away again. Had been eyeing original 5D prior to Mark II introduction. Love the 21MP pictures which allow lots of cropping. Where to start? Full-frame cameras take amazing pictures, and this is no exception.
cjlesh 10:45am on Tuesday, September 28th, 2010 
I use this camera for food photography. The full frame sensor makes narrow depths of field easier to achieve. This is a great overall camera. When using the AF assist beam with a 580EX II flash AF is tack sharp even in low light. Love this camera, buy it now! Easy To Use,Fast / Accurate Auto-Focus,Fast Shutter Speed,Good Image Quality,Good Image Stabilization.
Mos 12:34pm on Tuesday, August 10th, 2010 
I bought this camera as an upgrade to a Canon Rebel. fantastic quality camera Great Image Quality, Easy To Use, Bright LCD, Image Stabilization, Fast Shutter Speed, Strong Construction. Not much more I can say other than I LOVE this camera! Image Stabilization, Great Image Quality, Fast Shutter Speed, Bright LCD.
kresimir 11:39pm on Thursday, August 5th, 2010 
I have wanted a 5D ever since it was introduced. Now that I have one, I am completely satisfied with my purchase decision. Easy To Use". I use this in semi low light constantly. It performs wonderfully at 2500 ISO with very little noise. The image capture is superb.
dom_dum 9:41am on Friday, July 30th, 2010 
full frame dslr is a bit cumbersome but the IQ justifies it for me. very good camera, very good low light, quality very sharp none at this time
johnrobot 7:57pm on Saturday, July 3rd, 2010 
Great camera at a great price. One of the better online shopping experiences out there. design, features, Large Display Screen, picture quality.

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

INTRODUCTION

The Bolex H-16 Rex 5 is a 16mm reflex camera. The optical system permits through the lens viewing at all times. It is an extremely versatile, portable, dependable, well-built camera. The selfthreading allows easy loading of daylight spools. This cameras features include single frame, extended exposure, slow motion, a 135 angle variable shutter, and backwind. Media Loan has H-16 Bolex cameras, zoom lenses, many prime lenses, and a double system sync package with 400 foot magazines as well as other accessories.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION RELFEX VIEWFINDER DIOPTER ADJUSTMENT DOUSER TURRET FILTERS CAMERA MOTOR FILM SPEEDS RELEASE SELECTOR (ON/OFF) VARIABLE SHUTTER LAP DISSOLVE LOADING THE CAMERA CAMERA DIAGRAM FOOTAGE COUNTER FRAME COUNTER TROUBLESHOOTING REFERENCE ILLUSTRATIONS WRITTEN TEST OPERATIONAL PROFICIENCY TEST
Written by: Michael Majoros and Marge Brown Graphics and Compilation by: Marge Brown, Kieth Ogren and Curt Gullan Additional Information by: Alley Hinkle, Kathleen Doherty and Curt Gullan
Media Loan The library Group The Evergreen State College
http://www.evergreen.edu/media
(360) 867-5506 Olympia, WA 98505
Reflex Viewfinder The optical system of the Bolex H16 reflex permits through the lens viewing at all times. This system utilizes a beam splitter so the image seen in the viewfinder is completely free from flicker. The reflex finder enables accurate focusing and framing, and allows you to estimate the depth of field. The reflex prism deflects 20-25% of the light passing through the lens into the viewfinding system. Only 75-80% reaches the film plane. The actual quality of light reaching the film is reduced by about 1/2 to 1/3 of an f-stop. To compensate for this, Bolex has determined that the effective shutter speed for the H16 camera is 1/80 second rather than the standard 1/65 of a second. To further confuse matters, Bolex (in conjunction with Kern/ Switar) has designed a series of lenses which are calibrated to pass 1/2 to 1/3 stop more light that the aperture markings on the barrel indicate, compensating for the light lost to the viewfinding system.
The letters rx designates these lenses after the name on the barrel. When using these lenses with the H16 camera, the effective exposure is back to 1/65 of a second.

Bolex H16

Other Camera
Under expose film by 1/3 to 1/2 stop Read exposure meter at 1/65 a second

RX Non RX

Read exposure meter at 1/65 a second Read exposure meter at 1/80 a second
Warning: Light meters in Media Loan are calibrated for 180 angle shutter not the 135 angle shutter in the Bolex H16
Diopter Adjustment This adjustment corrects the optical system to the operators eyesight (whether or not if s/he wears glasses) and remains the same for all lenses on the camera. To set the diopter: 1. Turn the turret to expose the reflex prism (no lens in taking position). 2. View a well-lighted subject. 3. Loosen the grooved ring around the viewfinder and turn the lever until the grain of the ground glass is perfectly sharp. 4. Tighten the ring that acts as a lock nut. Some viewfinders have locking screws. Douser The douser (located on the reflex viewfinder) closes the eyepiece to keep light from reaching and fogging the film plane through the viewfinder.

It is necessary to use the douser when doing pixilation with a strong light behind the camera. The douser is open when the lever is in the horizontal position; closed in the vertical position.
Diopter Adjust Eyecup Turret Lock Diopter Lock

Filter Slot Turret

Turret By turning the turret you can change from one lens to another. To turn the turret, use its fold away lever rather than handling the lenses. In this way, there is less risk of accidentally changing the aperture and/or focus ring. When using heavy lenses, such as telephotos or zooms, the turret should be locked with either a special locking clamp or a turret plug. Turret plugs go into the lowest lens cavity (when turret is on normal position); they are marked with a red ring. For other lighter lenses, the turret lock on the camera should be sufficient. This lock is located above the lens in the taking position and should be tighten before the lenses are in place. Keep the wide-angle lenses and telephoto lens opposite of each other on the turret so the telephoto lens doesnt interfere with the field of view of the wide-angle lens.
Lens Taking Position Turret Lock Screw

Release Button

Filters The H16 camera has a filter between the taking lens position and the reflex prism. The filters therefore remain in place no matter which lens is used. When filming without a filter, an empty filter carrier should be left in the filter slot to prevent light from entering the slot and fogging the film. Make sure the carrier is located firmly within the slot and the correct filter is in place before shooting. An incorrect filter will either alter the color balance or exposure.

MOT Turret Lock

Filter holer

Spring Disengage Lever

Disengage
Film Speeds Camera Motor The Bolex H16 has its own internal spring drive motor. This allows an electric motor to be used and also allows you to backwind the film for camera dissolves. Turn the motor disengaging lever to MOT and move the slide release to stop. If the side release will not go to stop, slightly wind the spring. Lift the winding crank, which automatically engages the spindle, and turn counterclockwise. Wind the spring fully without forcing it. Fold the crank and secure it on the latch on the lower body. Fully wound, the motor will drive about eighteen feet of film through the camera (about 28 seconds at 24fps). IMPORTANT: Never leave the camera wound during storage. This may ruin the spring. When running down the spring with no film in the camera, set film speed at 8fps. The camera has seven film speeds from 12 to 64 frames per second (fps). To select the desired speed, turn the control knob until the corresponding figure is opposite the red dot. When changing filming speeds do not forget to alter the exposure setting. (When changing from 24 to 48 by one stop and so forth.) Release Selector (on/off) The H16 can be used for normal, continuous, or single frame filming. The different operations are controlled by the side release. Normal filming-- This method is suitable for most shooting situations. Then camera runs as long as the operator depresses the front release or pushes the side release towards M. Continuous filming-- Push the side release towards M until it clicks into place. The camera will continue running until the wind runs out or the side lever is pushed to the STOP position.

Variable Shutter

Backwind Electric Motor Shaft Extended Exposure Select Time
The H16 is equipped with a shutter whose aperture can be varied when the camera is running and when it is stopped. This enables you to reduce exposure time without altering the camera running speed or f-stop. In bright light, the variable shutter can be used to reduce exposure, therefore eliminating the need for a neutral density filter. The shutter may be locked in each of its four positions by pulling it out and pushing in when at the desired setting. Fully open -- normal exposure -- at the red mark. 1/4 closed -- exposure reduced by a half stop 1/2 closed -- exposure reduced by a full stop Fully closed -- no light reaching the film plane In some cameras, a triangular warning signal will appear in the viewfinder if the variable shutter is not in the fully open position.

Instantaneous

Film Speed Selector

Continuous Run

Single Frame

Slide Release

Single frame filming-- Instantaneous: Turn the knob until the guide mark is in the I position. The effective exposure time in this position is 1/30 of a second. Time: Place guide mark in T position; shutter will remain open as long as side release is in the P position.
Lap Dissolve Superimposing a fade-in on a fade-out makes a lap dissolve so that one picture gradually disappears as the next gradually appears. This allows for a smooth transition during which the picture brightness scarcely varies. To produce lap dissolve, close the first shot in a sequence with a fade-out. Lock the shutter in the closed position. Set the frame control to zero. Disengage the motor. Set the slide release to the M position. Douse the Viewfinder. Cap the lens. Rewind the film, using the backwind key, until the frame counter indicates the duration of the fade-out. Move the slide release to the STOP position. Frame the second sequence to be filmed and release the slide lever. At the same time make a fade-in the same length as the fadeout. Duration of the fade in seconds 1 1/2 1/Loading the Camera Before loading: 1. Set side release to stop. 2. Set disengaging motor to MOT. 3. Turn FPS selector knob until the number corresponding to the desired camera speed faces the red dot. 4. Wind the camera. Check that the pressure plate pin is locked so that the pressure plate cannot open. Number of frames/ Filming Speed 18 fps 24 fps 940 928
The film will jam at this point if the plate is not closed. Remove the empty spool from its spindle by pressing the ejector. Place the loaded daylight spool on the upper spindle. (Film should come off in the direction indicated by the engraved arrow). IMPORTANT: At the film gate the emulsion should always face towards the front of the camera. Using the film knife (located at the bottom of the camera), clip the film end.Close the loop formers by moving the control lever parallel to the pressure plate. Insert film end in the top feed sprocket and start the camera motor. The film is automatically threaded through the gate. If you need to adjust the film, you can spread the sprocket guides by sliding the locking plate forward. Continue to run the camera until 12 to 15 inches of film have passed through the drive mechanism. Open the loop formers by pressing the button located on the sprocket/gate assembly. Insert the film end into the take-up spool (in the direction of the engraved arrow), place the spool on the lower spindle and take up any

Loop Formers

Pressure Plate Pin

Sprocket Guides Release

Sprocket Guide Lock

Camera Diagram

Feed Spindle Pressure Plate Release Pin
Audible Signal Select Pressure Plate Sprocket Guides Spool Ejector
Filter Holder Loop Former Lock Release
Sprocket Guide Lock Release

Retaining Arm

Take Up Spindle

Film Knife

slack by hand. Run the camera again for several seconds to make sure that everything is okay (check that the film is advancing normally and the loops do not scrape the body). Replace the lid and lock. Footage Counter The footage counter indicates how much film has been exposed. Once the camera has been loaded, the counter will read FEET. Run the camera until the figure 0 appears opposite the white line in the indicator window. This indicates the film leader has been taken up and the camera is ready to be used. The counter will automatically return to 0 when the lid is removed. When shooting a 24 fps, there is the option for an audible CLICK every second indicating that 8 inches of film has passed through the camera. This can be useful when timing a pan or zoom shot. For an audible CLICK, move the audible signal select lever down when loading film; for no click place the lever in the 0 position.
Frame Counter The frame counter is helpful for lap dissolves, double exposures, and animation. The upper dial adds the frame in forward run and subtracts them in reverse (0 to 50 frames). The lower dial totals in unit of 50 frames. It will subtract when the camera runs in reverse. Indicators are from 0 to 1000 frames.

Troubleshooting

Problem and Probable Cause
Film is black: Variable lens shutter was closed Lens cap left on Exposure incorrect Film underexposed, images reversed; with color film, general orange tint: Film incorrectly loaded with the base facing forward instead of the emulsion Jumpy Images: Loops formed incorrectly Shrunken film stock Prevailing red-orange tint: Using tungsten lamps with a daylight film or an underpowered tungsten lamp Obscured Images: Turret Incorrectly positioned Telephoto lens on turret obscuring view of other lenses Partly obscured pictures: Telephoto lens in the way of the taking lens or turret badly positioned Parallel scratches on the edge of the film: Dust or particles of emulsion in the film gate Camera poorly loaded

Frame Counter

100s of Frames

Frame Reset

Troubleshooting Continued
Fogged film: Light entering through the viewfinder or filter slot Film was loaded in extremely bright light Camera not seated well Film fogged at edges: Camera loaded in strong light Warped take up or feed reel Filter carrier not in slot during exposure Out of focus or breathing pictures: Pressure plate incorrectly locked

Exposure Meter Shoe

Filter Holder

Referance Illustrations

Magazine Cavity Cover

Carrying Handle

Turret Lever
Optical Viewfinder Bracket

Turret Locking Screw

Starting Button

Lid Lock

Please complete the proficiency test before checking out the Bolex H16 from media loan
Written Test 1. List the four steps necessary to set the diopter adjustment. 2. How many frames per second is the Bolex capable of shooting? How few? 3. What kind of viewing system does the Bolex H16 employ? 4. What is the maximum shutter angle of the Bolex H16? What is the shutter speed? 5. Explain the difference between Bolex Rx lenses and normal lenses. What is the effect on the shutter speed, and how do you compensate? 6. What is the function of the turret plug? 7. List the steps necessary to perform a lap dissolve. 8. List the steps necessary to thread the camera. 9. Describe any precautions you need to take while cleaning and operating the Bolex. 10. What is the extent of your financial responsibility in case of loss, or damage to the camera? Operational Proficiency Test 1. Identify all of the parts and control of the Bolex H16. 2. Set the diopter and place the 85b filter in the camera. 3. Set the fps at 24, set the counter at 0. 4. Load the film in the camera. 5. Demonstrate how to create a lap dissolve. 6. Demonstrate extended exposure and animation features. 7. Display proper lens mounting to insure appropriate taking balance.

doc1

MEDIA LOAN Advanced Production

Operating Guide for

Services

BOLEX H16 REFLEX

APS Operating Guides are available online at www.evergreen.edu/medialoan/
Bolex H-16 SBM set up for stop-moton filming.
The Bolex H-16 Rex and H-16 SBM cameras are 16mm reflex cameras. It is an extremely versatile, portable, dependable, well built camera. The optical system permits through-the-lens viewing at all times. The self-threading allows easy loading of daylight spools. Camera features include single-frame filming, extended exposure, slow motion, backwind and a 133-145 angle variable shutter. Media Loans Advanced Production Services (APS) has a variety of Bolex H-16 cameras manufactured between 1960 and 1976. Although all have similar features, the controls vary slightly. Also available for use with the Bolex cameras are zoom lenses, prime lenses, 400 foot magazines, a motor for sync sound, and intervalometer as well as other accessories.

INTRODUCTION

Although the Bolex is a very well built and dependable camera, care must be taken when using a Bolex checked out from APS as they are expensive and difficult to replace. 11 DO NOT subject the camera to severe impacts or prolonged vibrations. 11 DO NOT subject the camera to extreme heat or cold. Drastic temperature changes can cause condensation to occur inside the camera. Let the camera acclimate to the environment you are shooting in by letting it rest in the case with the case tabs opened but the lid closed for at least an hour. 11 DO NOT touch the prism. 11 DO NOT use excessive force or over tighten anything on the camera. You are 100% financially responsible for repair and/or replacement in the event of damage or loss of the Bolex as well as any other equipment checked out from Media Loan.
Advanced Production Services Media Loan 360.867.5506

Please Recycle!

The Evergreen State College Olympia, WA 98505
bolexh16 | 04.19.11 | AEG

MEDIA LOAN

Bolex H-16 Reflex with Turret Mount
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.
Diopter adjustment Diopter locking ring Eyecup MOT (engaged) Spring disengage lever 0 (disengaged) Footage counter Winding crank Latch Douser Frame Counter Backwind
13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23.
Instantaneous exposure Electric motor shaft Timed exposure Frame rate select STOP (side release) M (continuous run) Release selector P (single-frame) Variable shutter Turret Turret lever
Beam Splitter and Pellicule The beam splitter consists of two prisms cemented together. The surface where they touch is coated with a partially reflecting mirror. A pellicule is a very thin partially reflectng mirror.
Film Beam Splitter Between the Lens and Film This system is used by Bolex Rex 16mm cameras. Most light passes through the beam splitter to expose the film, but some is deflected for the reflex system. The image of the subject is projected on the ground glass screen, and viewfinder optics relay it to the eye.

Ground glass screen

Beam splitter

Pellicule

Beam Splitter

Reflex Viewfinder

The optical system of the Bolex H-16 reflex cameras utilizes a beam splitter permitting through the lens viewing at all times free from flicker. The reflex viewfinder enables accurate focusing and framing, and allows you to estimate the depth of field. The reflex prism deflects 20 - 25% of the light passing through the lens into the viewfinder system. Only 75 80% of the light reaches the film plane. The actual quality of the light reaching the film is reduced by about 1/2 to 1/3 of an f-stop. To compensate for the light reduction, Bolex has determined that the effective shutter speed for the H-16 camera is 1/80 of a second rather than the standard 1/65 of a second. Another compensation for the light loss is the RX lens designed by Bolex with Kern/ Switar. The RX lens is calibrated to pass 1/2 to 1/3 more light than the aperture markings on the barrel indicates. When using RX lenses with the H-16 camera, the effective shutter speed is back to 1/65 of a second. APS will provide you with RX lenses (designated after the name on the barrel of the lens), unless you request otherwise or no RX lenses are available. make sure you know whether or not the lenses you are checking out are RX or non-RX. (Ask an APS employee to show you how to check the lens if necessary.) When using non-RX lenses of 50 mm or less, satisfactory results can be obtained when stopped down to f/8 or smaller.

Douser

The douser (located on the reflex viewfinder) closes the eyepiece to keep light from reaching and fogging the film plane through the viewfinder. The douser is open when the lever is in the horizontal position and closed when in the vertical position. Close the douser whenever your eye is removed from the eyepiece to prevent film from fogging.

Diopter Adjustment

The diopter adjustment corrects the optical system to the operators eyesight and remains the same for all lenses on the camera. If you wear glasses, you can adjust the diopter to your eyesight and achieve accurate focus without your glasses. Always set the diopter to your eyesight (before filming).
Diopter Locking Screw Douser in OPEN position Diopter Adjustment Bolex H-16 SBM viewfinder. 3
To set the diopter: 1. 2. 3. Turn the turret to expose the reflex prism (no lens in the taking position) or remove the cover of the bayonet mount. Point the camera at a light source. Unlock the diopter adjustment either by loosening the grooved ring around the viewfinder or the locking screw depending on the camera model. Adjust the viewfinder until the grain of the ground glass is perfectly sharp. Lock the diopter finger tight, but DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN.

Turret

By turning the turret, you can change from one lens to another. To turn the turret, use the fold away lever rather than handling the lenses. In this way, there is less risk of accidentally changing the aperture and/or focus ring or damaging the lenses and/or camera. When using heavier lenses, such as telephoto or zoom lenses, the turret should be locked with a turret plug. Turret plugs go into the lowest lens cavity, when turret is in normal position, and most are marked with a red ring. For lighter lenses, the turret lock on the camera Turret should be sufficient for stabilizing the lock turret. This lock is located above the lens in the taking position and should Lens be tightened before the lenses are in taking position place. Place wide-angle lenses and the Turret lever telephoto lenses opposite of each other on the turret so that the telephoto lens does not interfere with the field of the Variable shutter wide-angle lens. To attach a lens, simply unscrew the turret cap and screw on the lens. You can have up to three lenses mounted at once on the turret mount. If using less than three lenses, make sure turret caps are secured in unused positions. ALWAYS keep loose turret caps and lens caps in the case to avoid losing them.

Turret plug Filter holder
Front release button Bolex H-16 Rex turret.

Turret Mount Filters

Cameras with a turret mount have a filter between the taking lens position and the reflex prism. The filter remains in place no matter which lens is used. When filming without a filter, an empty filter carrier should be left in the filter slot to prevent light from entering the camera trough the slot and fogging the film. Make sure the carrier is located firmly within the slot and the correct filter is in place before shooting. An incorrect filter will either alter the color balance or exposure.

Bayonet Mount

The Bolex H-16 SBM camera has a single lens bayonet mount and is recommended for use with heavier lenses. To mount a lens: Turn the outer ring in the direction of the arrow (counter-clockwise if camera is facing you). Press the button on the bottom of the mount to move the screw into the open position where you will se the tabs of the cap. Lift the cap out of the mount and immediately place the lens mount in its place. Be careful not to touch the prism! Turn the ring clockwise to secure the lens mount in place and screw the lens into place. Unscrew the lens; replace lens caps and return to lens case. Turn outer ring as described above until tabs in lens ring are revealed. To remove the lens mount, tip camera forward with hand cupped under below to catch the lens mount. DO NOT touch prism with fingers! Replace cap and secure by turning lens clockwise.
To remove a lens and secure the bayonet mount: 4. 5. 6.

Bayonet Mount Filters

To insert a filter: 1. 2.
Filter insertion is from the control side of the camera. When not in use, the filter should be left in the storage position with the lever folded down and locked. Slide the button down and insert the filter into the filter slot with the notched side down. The first position is where the filter can be stored until needed. Fold the handle down and secure in notch.
To use the filter, it must be inserted all the way in to the filter slot so that it is in between the lens and the prism. 3. From the storage position, unfold the lever. Slide the button down and continue inserting the filter until its all the way in.

Film Speeds

The camera has film speeds ranging from 12 to 64 frames per second, except for the H-16 Reflex (the earliest model) which also has a setting for 8fps. To select the desired film speed, turn the control knob until the corresponding figure is opposite the red dot. When changing filming speeds, do not forget to alter exposure setting. (When changing from 24 to 48 by one stop and so forth.)
Release Selector (aka Side Release)
The H-16 can be used for normal, continuous or single frame filming. The different operations are controlled by the release selector. Normal This method is suitable for most shooting situations. The camera runs as long as the operator depresses the front release button or pushes the release selector towards M.

Release selector.

Continuous Push the release selector towards M until it clicks into place. The camera will continue running until the wind runs out or the release selector is pushed back to the STOP position. Single frame Use a cable release adapter to attach a cable release to the release selector. The adapter should be set so that the cable release pushes the release selector towards the P. Single frame exposures can be set for Instantaneous or Time Release. Turn the knob or lever to I to select Instantaneous. The effective shutter speed is 1/30 of a second. To select Time Release, set the knobs guide mark or the lever to T. The shutter will stay open for as long as the release selector is set to P.

Camera Motor

The H-16 cameras have a spring drive motor. The motor can be disengaged to backwind the film. Most cameras that are available from APS can be used with a motor and therefore used with the Intervalometer for time-lapse animation or with electric motor for sync sound. To wind the camera: 1. Set the disengaging Frame speed select dial and Instantaneous and Time Release selector. lever to MOT and the release selector to STOP. (If the release selector will not go to STOP, slightly wind the spring.) Lift the winding crank, which automatically engages the spindle, and set so that the slot in the handle is secured on the tab. Wind the spring counter-clockwise fully without forcing it. Fold the crank back and secure it on the latch on the lower body.
Fully wound, the motor will drive about 18 feet of film through the camera (about 28 seconds at 24fps). Important: Never leave the camera wound during storage. This may ruin the spring. When running down the camera with no film loaded, set the film speed at the lowest setting.
7 Motor select in MOT position.

Variable Shutter

The H-16 is equipped with a shutter capable of having its aperture varied whether or not the camera is running or stopped. This enables you to reduce exposure time without altering the camera running speed or f-stop. In bright light, the variable shutter can be used to reduce exposure, therefore eliminating the need for a neutral density filter. The shutter may be locked in each of its five positions by pulling it out and pushing in when at the desired setting. The markings on the variable shutter correspond to the equivalent f-stop change (i.e., filming at the 1/2 mark is equivalent to stopping down by 1/2, at mark 2 equals closing down the lens diaphragm by 2 stops.) When the variable shutter is fully closed, no light enters the film plane. Warning: You can still see an image through the viewfinder if the variable shutter is closed. Some cameras show a triangular warning signal, but not all. Make sure you variable shutter is opened to the correct setting when filming.

Footage Counter

The footage counter indicates how much film has been exposed. The counter will automatically reset when the lid is removed and will read FEET.
Variable shutter in open and locked position.

Frame Counter

The frame counter is helpful for lap dissolves, double exposures and animation. The frame counter adds frames in forward run and subtracts them in reverse. The upper dial counts single frames, 0 - 50. The lower dial totals in units of 50 frames, 0 - 1000.

Loading the Camera

The H-16 has automatic threading and loop forming capabilities making it an easy camera to load. When shooting at 24fps, there is an option for an audible click every second indicating that 8 inches of film has passed through the camera. This can be useful when timing a pan or zoom shot. For an audible click, move the audible signal select lever down when loading film; for no click place the lever in the 0 position. Before loading the camera: 1. 2. 3. 4. Set the release selector to STOP. Set the disengaging lever to MOT. Set the frame rate to the desired camera speed. Wind the camera.
Open the camera lid. Visually inspect the film gate to make sure that it is not dirty. DO NOT use condensed air to blow dust from the camera. Cleaning the gate is a delicate procedure and you can cause irreparable damage if you do not do it correctly. Cameras are inspected and cleaned when they are returned to Media Loan so the camera you check out should be ready for filming. Use care when loading the camera so that you do not inadvertently get hair or debris inside which could ruin your film. Make sure your hands are clean before loading film or otherwise poking about inside the camera.
TO LOAD THE CAMERA: 1. Check that the pressure plate is locked so that it cannot open. The film will jam at this point if the plate is not closed. 2. Close the loop formers by moving the control lever down so that it is parallel to the pressure plate. 3. Remove the empty daylight spool from its spindle by pressing the ejector. This will be your take-up spool. (The spool can pop out so block it with your hand.) 4. Place the loaded daylight spool on the upper spindle. The film should come off in the direction of the engraved arrow. At the film gate, the emulsion should always face towards the front of the camera. 5. Using the film end located at the bottom of the camera, clip the film end. 6. Insert film end in the top feed sprocket and start the camera motor by depressing the front release button. 7. The film is automatically threaded through the gate. If you need to adjust the film, you can spread the sprocket guides by carefully pushing the sprocket guide in from the sprocket wheels. 8. Continue to run the film until about 12 inches have run through the drive mechanism.

1 - Pressure Pad Locking Pin 2 & 10 - Loop Former 3 & 12 - Spool Shaft 4 - Loop Former Locking Lever and Opening Knob 5 - Audible Signal Click Lever
6 - Spool Ejector 7 - Spool Retaining Arm 8 - Sprockets 9 - Pressure Pad 11 - Film Knife
9. Open the loop formers by pressing the button on the lever located on the sprocket/gate assembly. 10.Insert the film end into the take-up spool in the direction of the engraved arrow. Place the spool on the lower spindle and take up any slack by hand. 11.Run the camera again for several seconds, listening to make sure the film is threaded properly. Check that the film is advancing properly and that the loops do not scrape the body. 12.Replace the lid and lock. 13.The footage counter will be reset. Run the camera until the counter reads 0. This indicates the film leader has been taken up and the camera is ready to be used. Film can be loaded in light, but subdued light is best.

Lap Dissolve

Superimposing a fade-in on a fade-out makes a lap dissolve so that one picture gradually disappears as the next gradually appears. (This is also known as a cross-dissolve.) This allows for a smooth transition during which the picture brightness scarcely varies. To produce a lap dissolve: 1. Close the first shot in a sequence with a fade out. When beginning to close down the variable shutter, note what frame you are at in the frame counter. Alternatively, time how long it takes you to reach the closed position from the start of the fade and stop filming. Lock the variable shutter in the closed position. Disengage the motor by setting the selector to 0. Set the release selector to M. Close the douser if not already closed by moving it into the vertical position. Cap the lens. Using the backwind key, rewind the film until the frame counter indicates the duration of the fade out. Move the release selector to the STOP position. Frame the second sequence to be filmed. As you begin filming by pressing the release selector to M, begin the fade in by moving the variable shutter smoothly to the open position. Lock the variable shutter into the open position.
2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
The Rex-o-fader is an accessory that can help with smooth fades and is available at APS. Ask an APS employee to show you how to attach and use it if you decide to check it out with a Bolex.

Troubleshooting

PROBLEM CAUSE Film is black: Variable shutter was closed. Lens cap left on. Exposure incorrect. Film underexposed, images reversed; Film loaded incorrectly with the base facing with color film, general orange tint: forward instead of the emulsion. Jumpy Images: Loops formed incorrectly. Shrunken film stock. Prevailing red-orange tint: Using tungsten lamps with a daylight film. An underpowered tungsten lamp. Partially or Completely Obscured images: Turret incorrectly positioned. Telephoto lens on turret obscuring view of other lenses. Parallel scratches on the edge of the film: Dust or particles of emulsion in the film gate. Camera poorly loaded.

PROBLEM

CAUSE Fogged film: Light entering through the viewfinder or filter slot. Film loaded in extremely bright light. Camera not seated well. Film fogged at edges: Camera loaded in strong light. Warped take up or feed reel. Filter carrier not in slot during exposure. Out of focus or breathing pictures: Pressure plate incorrectly locked.
Please read manual and complete written portion of test prior to operational proficiency. Bring answers with you with your name and TESC ID number clearly indicated. 1. List the four steps necessary to set the diopter adjustment. 2. How many frames per second is the Bolex capable of shooting? How few? 3. What kind of viewing system does the Bolex H16 employ? Describe how it works. 4. Explain the difference between Bolex Rx lenses and normal lenses. What is the effect on the shutter speed, and how do you compensate? 5. Describe the difference between a bayonet mount and a turret mount camera. 6. What is the function of the turret plug? 7. List the steps necessary to perform a lap dissolve. 8. List the steps necessary to load the camera. 9. Describe any precautions you need to take while cleaning and operating the Bolex. 10.What is the extent of your financial responsibility in case of loss, or damage to the camera? 1. Identify all of the parts and control of the Bolex H16. 2. Set the diopter and place the 85b filter in the camera. 3. Set the fps at 24, set the counter at 0. 4. Load the film in the camera. 5. Demonstrate how to create a lap dissolve. 6. Demonstrate extended exposure and animation features. 7. Display proper lens mounting to insure appropriate taking balance on turret mount camera. Mount lens on bayonet mount camera.

BOLEX PROFICIENCY TEST

Written Test
Operational Proficiency Test

 

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