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smiththe 12:48am on Monday, June 28th, 2010 
****Final Fantasy x-2 **** Having played and completed several final fantasy games when this one came out i had to buy it.

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G A M E P L AY M A N U A L
A X I S A N D A L L I E S PA C I F I C G A M E P L AY M A N U A L
PLAYERS: 2 to 3 AGES: 12 and up
WHATS DIFFERENT ABOUT AXIS & ALLIES PACIFIC?
Those of you who have played the classic version of Axis & Allies should be familiar with the majority of rules in this game. A summary of the major gameplay differences is listed below.
Bombers conducting Strategic Bombing Raids may be escorted by friendly fighters and attacked by enemy fighters. Battleships and submarines have new powers and abilities. There are three new types of combat units Destroyers, U.S. Marines and Artillery. IPCs gained are subject to attack in convoy routes and convoy centers. There is no weapons development. Order of play is different. Fighter planes may be moved into a sea zone to create Combat Air Patrols (CAPs). Naval bases have been added to key territories. This benefits friendly naval units moving to other naval bases. Air bases have been added to key territories. This benefits friendly aircraft moving to or from those key territories. Japan has a special first turn attack advantage. Japan may launch Kamikaze attacks.

CONTENTS

Gameboard Map 345 Plastic Playing Pieces Industrial Production Certificates (IPCs) 3 National Reference Charts National Control Markers National Production Chart Battle Board Task Force Cards 12 Dice Plastic Chips (red and gray)
Game Designers: Larry Harris, Stephen Baker, Rob Daviau Lead Playtester: Mark McLaughlin Playtesters: Michael Sandy, Ray Irwin, Aaron Chamberlain

STRATEGY THE BIG PICTURE

Japan wins the game by expanding her territorial gains, in particular the Dutch East Indies, and then holding them long enough to accumulate sufficient victory points to win. The British player must defend both India and Australia while simultaneously looking for opportunities to threaten Japanese territories. The Allies can use submarines to great effect by cutting the convoy routes to the more valuable Dutch East Indies territories. The American player must act quickly to counterattack. America has a strong economy but must plan effectively. Naval units, air power and land units will all be required to defeat Japan. As you play, youll discover that you must be a military strategist and a clever economist to win. Some territories you capture will increase your income. Keeping convoy routes open is vital to maintaining your economic income. As the game progresses your ability to attack and the intensity of these attacks will be influenced by how you have planned your purchases over previous turns.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Game Setup and Components. Industrial Production Certificates Gameboard. Combat Units..4.5.5.7
Object of the Game. 9 What to Do on a Turn. 10 Phase 1 Purchase Combat Units. 10 Phase 2 Combat Air Patrol Must Land. 10 Phase 3 Combat Movement. 11 Phase 4 Resolve Combat Amphibious Assaults. Multi-Player Forces. Strategic Bombing Raids Kamikaze. 21
Phase 5 Place / Remove National Control Markers and Adjust the National Production Chart. 21 Convoy Routes and Convoy Centers. 22 Phase 6 Non-Combat Movement. 23 Combat Air Patrol. 24 Phase 7 Place New Units. 25 Phase 8 Submerged Submarines Resurface Damaged Battleships Uprighted. 25 Phase 9 Collect Income. 25 Combat Units. 25
GAME SETUP AND COMPONENTS
1. Pick a World Power. There are three world powers in the game. Japan Great Britain controls two countries: India and Australia. The United States of America controls two countries: USA and China. Choose which world power(s) you will be based on the number of players in the game: 3-player Game Player 1: Japan Player 2: Great Britain (India and Australia) Player 3: United States (USA and China) 2-player Game Player 1: Japan Player 2: Great Britain (India and Australia) and United States (USA and China) Note: Throughout this manual, the terms "country" and "countries" refer to individual economies such as India, Australia, China or USA. 2. Distribute National Reference Charts.
3. Distribute National Control Markers (NCMs). Carefully punch out the NCMs from the cardboard sheets. Each country has its own NCMs as shown here.

Australia

British Convoy Place a Japanese marker on the number "0" space of the red Japanese Victory Point track and another on the "6" space of the Kamikaze track. Appoint one player to be scorekeeper. It will be his job to adjust the markers on the National Production Chart as areas change hands. 5. Industrial Production Certificates (money) The scorekeeper should also serve as banker in charge of IPCs (Industrial Production Certificates), commonly known as money. IPCs fuel the war effort for the countries. Separate the IPCs by denomination. Starting Income At the beginning of the game, the banker disburses IPCs as shown on the National Production Charts and below. The remaining money stays in "the bank." IPC amounts change as territories are captured or lost. The British player must keep the IPCs for each of his two countries (India and Australia) separate. British Convoys The British player also collects income for the three British Convoy centers located in sea zones 15, 49 and 52. These twelve IPCs must now be given to India or Australia, or divided between the two countries in any manner the British player wishes. They may not be kept separate. Note: Place your IPCs next to your National Reference Chart.

Country

Starting Income 12
United States India Australia Japan British Convoys
China does not collect IPCs. See page 10 for details.
Soviet Union and Himalayas: There are two beige territories on the gameboard (Soviet Union and Himalayas). Players may not move units into nor fly over either of these territories. China: Allied forces may move freely into and through Chinese controlled territories. Islands and Island Groups: Islands vary considerably in size. Borneo and Wake Island are both islands. Some sea zones contain more than one island. Each island or island group thats considered a separate territory has a white line surrounding it as well as a white name. Each island or island group may hold as many land and air units as a player wants to put on it.
Example: Sea zone 25 has an island group, the Mariana Islands, and the island of Guam. Each of these is a separate land territory, and both are separate from the sea zone in which they are situated.
Naval Bases and Air Bases Some territories contain Naval and/or Air bases. These bases provide movement advantages to friendly units. Air bases are explained on page 12. Naval bases are explained on page 24.
Note: Throughout the rules, territories and sea zones are sometimes referred to generically as "spaces." When you or an ally control these spaces, they are sometimes referred to as "friendly."
Diagram 1. Key Board Definitions

C O M B AT U N I T S

LAND UNITS
INFANTRY MARINES 7. The Combat Units. Color: Each country has combat units with a different color. Great Britain uses the tan units. USA uses the green units, along with the dark green Infantry (US Marines). China uses the brown units. Japan uses the red units. Note: Antiaircraft guns and Industrial Complexes are all gray. All players share them. Type: There are three different types of units. Land Units (infantry, U.S. Marines, tanks, AA guns and artillery) Air Units (fighters and bombers) Naval Units (destroyers, battleships, aircraft carriers, submarines and transports) A detailed profile of each combat unit how it moves, how it attacks, how it defends, how it interacts with other combat units, and how much it costs is provided in the Combat Units section on page 25.

Land units may only move between land territories unless being convoyed by naval transports. Naval units may only move between sea zones. Air units may move through land territories and sea zones. Moving a unit to one land territory, island, island group or sea zone from an adjacent land territory, island, island group or sea zone counts as moving one space. Moving an aircraft from a sea zone to an island or island group within that sea zone also counts as moving one space.
Example: Marching from Burma to Shan State is one land movement.

Diagram 6. Land Movement

Example: Sailing from the sea zone 34 to sea zone 38 is one sea movement.
Movement Summary The following rules apply to Combat Movement You may move units into enemy-controlled territories that have no combat units, other than AA Guns and Industrial Complexes, to take control of them without fighting. (This is considered Phase 3 Combat Movement, but there is no combat to resolve in Phase 4.) You may move any of your naval units out of sea zones containing enemy units (as long as your units were in the sea zone at the beginning of your turn), even if the movement prevents combat from taking place. You many not load or unload units on a transport ship in a sea zone that contains enemy units, unless the only enemy units present are submerged submarines. If the transport moves into a friendly or empty sea zone, it may load or unload troops. When moving air units during this sequence, there must be a friendly territory or aircraft carrier on which to land air units after combat is over. Aircraft may not be moved if there is no possibility for them to land. (See Air units section on page 24.) Any air units that fly over enemy antiaircraft guns during Combat Movement are subject to antiaircraft fire. If a unit flies over more than one territory containing enemy guns, it is subject to multiple attacks, one for each territory. This is in addition to any antiaircraft fire the air units are subjected to from an enemy territory being attacked. (See Resolving Land Combat section on page 13.) Units involved in Amphibious Assaults are moved during this sequence. (See Amphibious Assaults section on page 16.) Air units involved in Strategic Bombing Raids are moved during this sequence. (See Strategic Bombing Raids section on page 19.)
Diagram 7. Naval Movement
Land and naval units must end their movement when they move into a space that is occupied by enemy units. Aircraft may move through spaces occupied by enemy units, including aircraft.

Example: In section 1 of the battle board, each roll of a 1 by an attacking infantry unit scores a hit against the defenders choice of units. Example: In section 3 of the battle board, each roll of a 3, 2, or 1 by an attacking fighter plane or tank scores a hit against the defenders choice of units.
All combat movement must be completed before combat situations are resolved. Combat is resolved by rolling dice. This is often referred to as "firing." No new units may be moved into battle as reinforcements once Resolving Combat has begun. Each combat situation is resolved separately, territory by territory (or sea zone), in any order determined by the attacker. (Strategic Bombing Raids are conducted first see page 19 for details on Strategic Bombing Raids). Resolving Land Combat When land and/or air units move into an enemyoccupied territory, follow the sequence below. 1. Put combat units on the battle board. Both the attacking and defending players place the units involved in a combat situation (one territory) onto their respective side of the battle board. Position units on their matching shapes. The attack and defense strength for each unit is
After all hits (if any) are scored, the defender chooses which of his units will be casualties and moves them to the Casualties area on the battle board. These casualties will get a chance to fire back before being removed. (Combat is considered simultaneous, so each defending unit thats hit has an opportunity to return fire.) Important: Antiaircraft guns and Industrial
Complexes may not be chosen as casualties. 4. Defender fires back. After the attacking player has fired, the defending player rolls one die for each defending unit, including any that were moved to the Casualties area. Units in the Casualties area still have their normal defensive value: 2 or less for infantry, 2 or less for armor and so on.
Example: In section 2 of the battle board, each roll of a 2 or 1 by a defending infantry unit scores a hit against the attackers choice of units.
movement range and under its owners control since the beginning of the turn. Retreating planes, however, are still subject to enemy antiaircraft gunfire if they pass over territories with AA guns. Return the defending units that survived from the battle board to the territory. Note: Retreating is an attackers privilege only. B. The attacker is destroyed. If the defender destroys all the attacking units, the battle is over. Remove all destroyed units from play and return the defending units that survived to the territory. C. The defender is destroyed. If the attacker hits all the defending units, the battle is over after the defender counterattacks. Remove all destroyed units from play and return the attacking units that survived to the territory. The attacker captures the territory. D. Both attacker and defender are destroyed. If all units are hit during an attack and counterattack, the battle is over. Remove all destroyed units. Control of the territory remains unchanged. Resolving Naval Combat When naval and air units move into an enemyoccupied sea zone, follow the rules sequence below. 1. Put all units on the battle board. Both the attacking and defending players place the units involved in a combat situation (one sea zone) onto their respective side of the battle board. Position units on their matching shapes. The attack and defense strength for each unit is shown on the battle board. Note that there is a position for an attacking transport ship on the attacker side of the battle board, but there is no attack value assigned to it. An attackers transport should be placed on the bottom of the attackers side of the board, as indicated. Even though the transport has no attack factor, it may be selected as a casualty should the attacking force be required to eliminate a unit. 2. Attacking submarines may make "First-strike" attack, or submerge. Attacking submarines may usually fire before any other unit during each round of combat. This is called a First-strike attack. To launch a First-strike attack, roll one die for

Japans First Turn During Japans first turn only, Japan attacks in a normal fashion, but Allied units may defend only with a roll of 1. Exception: Any attacks made in Chinese territory are defended by rolling at full strength. 5. Remove all casualties. After all hits are scored by the defender, the attacker must remove that many units (attackers choice) from the battle board and place them out of play. After the defenders counterattack, the defender removes all of his units from the Casualties area of the battle board. They are placed out of play. 6. Repeat steps 3 through 5. Combat continues until one of the following four situations occurs: A. Attacker retreats. B. Attacker is destroyed. C. Defender is destroyed. D. Both attacker and defender are destroyed. A. The attacker retreats. The attacker must fight at least one round of combat. After both the attacker and defender have rolled, the attacker may retreat, thereby stopping that particular battle. The attacking land units may only retreat to an adjacent friendly territory that was under the owners control at the start of the turn and from which any of the attacking land units came. The units must all withdraw together to the same territory. Aircraft may retreat to any friendly land territory, island, island group or aircraft carrier still within
each attacking submarine. For every 2 or less rolled, the defender suffers a hit. Do not place any casualties on the Casualties area of the battle board. Instead, immediately remove them from play. They do not get a chance to counterattack. Note: The presence of an enemy destroyer in the battle negates all submarines first-strike ability. Submarines may never fire at air units, and air units may not be chosen as casualties for any hit scored by a submarine. Submarines may submerge instead of attacking. A submerged sub is turned onto its side to indicate this submerged condition. It remains on its side and may not attack or be attacked again on this turn. Submerged subs are returned to their upright position in Phase 8. See Combat Units Submarines section on page 33. 3. Attacker fires. The attacker now rolls one die for each attacking unit (except submarines that have already attacked or submerged). If the number rolled is equal to or less than the number shown on the attackers side of the battle board, then the attacker scores a hit. After all hits are scored (if any), the defender chooses which of his units are casualties and moves them to the Casualties area on the battle board. These casualties will get a chance to fire back before being removed. (Combat is considered simultaneous, so each defending unit thats hit has one opportunity to return fire.) Important: If a transport ship is hit, any units onboard go down with the ship. (A unit onboard may not be chosen as a casualty.) 4. Defender fires back and/or submerges. After the attacking player has completed firing all units on the battle board, the defending player rolls one die for each defending unit, including any that were moved to the Casualties area. Units in the Casualties area still have the normal defensive value shown on the battle board. Defending submarines may submerge instead of firing back. The sub is turned on its side to indicate this submerged condition. It remains on its side and may not attack or be attacked again on this turn. Submerged subs are returned to their upright position in Phase 8. Note: Submarines are the only defending units in

During Combat Movement, the attacker must declare that he is performing an Amphibious Assault and on what territory. He may not redirect it to a different territory during Phase 4 Resolve Combat, although it can be called off. Each transport can only unload into one territory it cannot split its cargo into two different territories. However, two different transports in the same sea zone can unload into two different territories, if the player desires. A single Amphibious Assault may also be made against a single territory from two different sea zones. Land units that are on adjacent territories may also take part in an Amphibious Assault. Air units may also participate, as well as battleships and destroyers in the same sea zone as the unloading transport. An Amphibious Assault is handled like any other land battle, except that all land units (including those that may have come from adjacent territories) lose their option of retreating. Air units may retreat as normal, after at least one round of combat has been fought. Moving a land unit into or out of a transport counts as that units full move. Transports that have been in battle may either load or unload (but not both) after the battle. Transports that retreat from a sea battle during an Amphibious Assault may not unload on that turn. For more information about transports, refer to the Naval Units Transports section on page 29. Resolving an Amphibious Assault Move all combatants to the battle board and do the following: 1. Naval battle precedes Amphibious Assault. During an Amphibious Assault, if there are enemy units in the same sea zone as the amphibious force, a naval battle must occur before land units may be unloaded. All of the attacking naval units, including transports, must defeat all enemy naval units in the sea zone before the transports may unload the attacking land units. If a player is forced to eliminate a transport or Japanese destroyer because of battle losses, any units onboard are also lost.
Once the sea zone is clear, the transports may be unloaded and the land battle begins. Any air units involved in the naval battle may not attack in land battle on the same turn. Note: After a naval battle, the attacker is allowed to call off the Amphibious Assault. He may not redirect it to another territory. Attacking Air Units During combat movement, the attacking player must declare the following: which aircraft are remaining in the sea zone to participate in the naval battle (and) which aircraft are flying to engage in the land battle. (movement permitting)

3. Defending AA gunfire. Defending AA gunfire at attacking enemy air units as previously described. 4. Conduct land combat. The attacker fires with all units involved in the land battle. The defender then counterattacks as usual. 5. Repeat step 4 until one side (or both) is destroyed. Remember that only attacking air units may retreat, and they may only retreat after at least one round of combat has been fought.
Amphibious Assault Example #1 On Japans turn the Japanese player loads a tank into a transport in sea zone 36, moves it to sea zone 25, and unloads it into Guam. The Japanese player also moves a fighter plane from the Mariana Islands into Guam. The destroyer in sea zone 25 provides a support shot, since it is in the same sea zone as the unloading transport, and has not participated in combat this turn. One die is rolled, resulting in a 3 a miss (destroyers only hit on a 2 when conducting shore bombardment). Japan now rolls for the tank and the fighter plane, a roll of two 5s results in two misses. Next, USA rolls one die for the defending marine unit in Guam. A 2 is rolled just one hit. Japan removes the tank. Without a land unit to take Guam, Japan decides to retreat. It moves the plane back to the Mariana Islands, and the battle is over.
Note: If the naval battle is lost by the attacker, or he decides to retreat his fleet, any aircraft engaged against the land battle must fight at least one round of combat before retreating. 2. Attacking battleships and destroyers conduct shore bombardment. If no naval battle was fought in the sea zone, battleships and destroyers may then bombard the shore provided they are in the same sea zone as the unloading transport(s). This is a one-shot support attack to provide cover fire for landing units. The attacker rolls one die for each battleship, looking for a 4 or less per die. The attacker then rolls one die for each destroyer, looking for a 2 or less per die. (This is different from the destroyers normal attack value of 3.) The defender chooses his casualties (if any) and moves them to the Casualties area of the battle board. (These units may fire during the defenders normal counterattack.) The attacker removes the attacking ships from the battle board and places them back in the sea zone on the gameboard. If a naval battle occurs before an Amphibious Assault, battleships and destroyers may not then conduct a shore bombardment. (These units were too involved in the naval battle to provide covering fire.) Japanese destroyers unloading infantry may not provide a support shot.
Diagram 10. Amphibious Assault 1
Amphibious Assault Example #2 Japan is attempting an Amphibious Assault in Queensland. Japan loads two infantry units into a transport in sea zone 27, and moves into sea zone 32, along with a submarine and a battleship. In the first round of naval combat, Japan rolls a 4 for the sub (which does not have a first shot attack because of the defending destroyer present), and a 4 for the battleship, scoring one hit. Great Britain then rolls a 1 for its destroyer, scoring a hit. Japan takes one hit on the battleship and turns it on its side. Now that the sea zone has been cleared of enemy ships, the transport may unload its units into Queensland. (As stated previously, Japan may not change its plans and unload into the Northern Territory, for example.) The battleship, which has participated in combat this turn, may not fire a support shot. Also, the Japanese destroyer in sea zone 29 may not fire a support shot since it is not in the same sea zone as the unloading transport. Japan fires for the infantry, rolling a 3 and a 4. Great Britain then rolls a 2, scoring a hit. Japan removes an infantry unit from the board. At this point, Japan would like to retreat, but cannot, since land units may not retreat from an Amphibious Assault. Japan fires for the infantry units, rolling a 1 and scoring a hit. However, the British player also rolls a 1, so both units are removed. Queensland, although clear of units, remains in British hands, since there are no Japanese ground forces to claim it.

Convoy Routes and Convoy Centers As stated earlier, sea zones are not captured, controlled or affected by the outcome of a battle. However, convoy routes and convoy centers within a sea zone can be successfully held by a defender or captured by an attacker. If, during combat movement, you move a naval unit (except a transport) through or into an empty sea zone containing a convoy route or convoy center, you take control of that route or center. Note: Submarines that begin a turn in an empty sea zone containing an enemy convoy route or convoy center may spend one of their two moves to remain in the sea zone and take control of it before using their second move to go to an adjacent sea zone. Following a Battle If the attacker is destroyed, withdraws and/or submerges, then no change of control is made to the convoy route or convoy center. If the attacker and the defender are both destroyed and/or submerge, then no change of control is made to the convoy route or convoy center.
Note: If a convoy center is successfully defended, then no adjustment of the NPC is necessary. Convoy Routes If a convoy route is captured and the enemy controls the associated territory then the enemys National Production level is decreased. The capturing player does not increase his National Production level. If a convoy route is captured and you or a friendly player controls the associated territory then the nation controlling the territory increases its National Production level. Territories If the defender loses the battle and the space has an IPC value, the National Production level is increased for the country now in control of the space. However, as stated earlier, an attacker who liberates an Allied space doesnt earn the IPC value. The IPC value returns to the original ally. Note: If the attacker captures a territory but the associated convoy route is in enemy control the attacker does not increase his National Production level. However, the enemy National Production level is decreased. Capturing an Enemy Capital Remember that one object of the game is to capture and hold an enemy capital through one turn (while still controlling your own capital). Capturing a capital (identified with the countrys national symbol) is done the same way as capturing any other territory. Enemy forces must be eliminated and a land combat unit must occupy the territory. When a capital is captured, the National Production Chart is adjusted accordingly for the capturing player and the losing player. In addition, the capturing player immediately takes all of the IPCs that the losing player has on hand. (This is an exception to the regular IPC rules.) If Japan captures an allied capital, the Japanese player may add any IPCs taken to those collected at the end of the turn for calculating victory points scored. Note: If the Chinese capital province of Szechwan is captured, Japan does not collect any IPCs from China. Thats because China has no IPCs. (Their infantry units are built automatically.) However, China may not place any new infantry units until Szechwan has been retaken. If Japan is captured,

Artillery Movement Example Great Britain is bringing two infantry units and one artillery unit into Siam to attack the two Japanese units there, one artillery and one infantry. The British artillery unit attacks, as does one of the infantry units, both hoping for a roll of 2 or less. The other infantry unit attacks, hoping for a 1, as there is no other artillery unit to pair up with it. The Japanese infantry and artillery units both defend, hoping to roll a 2 or less.

Diagram 15. Artillery

INFANTRY Movement: 1 Attack Factor: 1 Defense Factor:2 Cost: 3 IPCs Description These units are a good buy for a defensive position because each costs only 3 IPCs, and they defend with a die roll of 2 or less. For each artillery unit attacking the same territory one Infantry unit may attack with a roll of 2 or less.
TANKS Movement: 2 Attack Factor: 3 Defense Factor: 2 Cost: 5 IPCs Description Tanks cost more than infantry, yet they still defend with a die roll of 2 or less. Therefore, as defensive land units, tanks are the weaker choice. But as attacking land units, tanks are definitely more powerful than infantry. They also have more mobility. They attack with a die roll of 3 or less instead of the weaker infantry attack capability of 1. You may move a tank through two territories, if the first territory is a friendly one. However, if the first territory is enemy-controlled, but not enemyoccupied, your tank may "blitz" through it. This is described as follows: The Blitz: 1. 2. 3. 4. Move the tank into the unoccupied enemy territory. Place a control marker on the territory. Adjust the National Production Chart to show the change. Move the tank into the second territory. The second territory may be an enemy-occupied territory, an enemy-controlled territory, or a friendly territory.
U.S. MARINES Movement: 1 Attack Factor: 1 or 2 Defense Factor: 2 Cost: 4 IPCs (USA only) Description Only the United States has Marine units, these are the dark green infantry pieces. Marines normally attack just like infantry units (with a roll of 1). However, they are more effective in Amphibious Assaults, as explained below: A Marine unit attacking in an Amphibious Assault scores a hit on a roll of 2 or less. A Marine unit that enters combat by moving from one land territory to another land territory may still attack with a roll of 2 or less as long as at least one friendly unit attacks from a sea zone making the battle an Amphibious Assault. For each artillery unit attacking the same territory one Marine unit may attack with a roll of 2 or less. For each artillery unit attacking the same territory in an Amphibious Assault that is not paired with an infantry unit, one Marine unit may attack with a roll of 3 or less.
A blitzing tank may also move into the first territory and back to its starting territory on the same turn. Note: An enemy-controlled territory with nothing but AA guns is still considered occupied, and may not be blitzed through. However, during the Resolve Combat phase, a tank which moved into the territory automatically takes control of the territory without rolling dice.

move out of an enemy-filled sea zone and into a friendly or empty sea zone, where it may load or unload normally. A transport that moves in this way is not considered to have been in combat this turn. A transport must unload all units into the same territory. It may not split units into two territories. Transports may not attack, but may defend in sea zones. Any land units aboard a transport that is attacked may not fire back. If the transport is destroyed, the land units aboard also "go down with the ship" and are removed.
unload in that zone, the transport may move. It moves into sea zone 32, where it picks up two infantry units, one from each of two territories, Queensland and Northern Territory. It then moves a second space to sea zone 33 and unloads both infantry units into Dutch New Guinea.
Another transport in sea zone 43 also starts in a space with an enemy sub. It moves to sea zone 47 and joins two British destroyers, which now battle the Japanese submarine that is present. The Japanese submarine is sunk, with no loss to the British. Since the transport was in combat (but now has a clear sea zone), it may unload or load units, but not both. An infantry unit in Malaya enters the transport, but may not be unloaded (into Sumatra) this turn.
Transport Movement Example On Great Britains turn, it uses several transports. The transport next to Queensland in sea zone 29 picks up two infantry units, moves two zones to sea zone 33 and unloads the two units into Dutch New Guinea. The transport next to Papua in sea zone 28 starts its turn in the presence of an enemy sub. It may not load nor

Diagram 17. Transports

BATTLESHIPS Movement: 2 Attack Factor: 4 Defense Factor: 4 Cost: 24 IPCs Description Battleships attack and defend in sea zones. These powerful (and expensive) ships attack and defend with a die roll of 4 or less, and must be hit twice in the same battle to be destroyed. On the first hit, the ship is laid on its side.
It may still attack and defend normally. If hit a second time, the ship is removed. If it does not receive a second hit, it is considered repaired and turned upright at the end of the turn. Battleships may also support attacks on enemy occupied coastal territories or islands. (See Amphibious Assaults section on page 16 for details.) Note: If a battleship takes the hit from a submarines First-strike attack, then the battleship may still fire back against the sub. However, if that battleship takes a second hit from the subs attack, it gets no counter-shot. (See Submarine First-strike rules on page 14.)

Diagram 18. Carriers

AIRCRAFT CARRIERS Movement: 2 Attack Factor: 1 Defense Factor: 3 Cost: 18 IPCs Description Aircraft carriers have strong defensive capabilities. They may attack and defend only in sea zones. Carriers attack with a roll of 1 and defend with a roll of 3 or less. Aircraft carriers may carry (or provide landing spots) for up to two Allied fighter planes. Allied fighter planes may take off and land on a friendly aircraft carrier on their respective turns. Aircraft carriers may be moved during the Noncombat Movement phase to allow fighters to land on them when they would otherwise be out of range. Aircraft carriers and fighter planes "interact" with each other somewhat differently depending upon whether or not it is the carriers turn. If you own the carrier and it is your turn: You must own the fighter aboard your aircraft carrier in order to move the fighter and/or attack with it. It must also take off before you move the carrier. If the fighter doesnt take off before you move the carrier, the fighter is treated as cargo for the remainder of your turn and may not fly, fight or be used as a casualty. An Allied fighter on your carrier may not take off, as it is not the Allied fighters turn. If a fighter lands upon your aircraft carrier during your turn, you may not move the carrier for the remainder of that turn. If you own the carrier and it is the enemys turn: If your carrier is defending against an attack, any fighters aboard are allowed to defend, and may be used as casualties instead of the carrier (except against a successful submarine attack). If your carrier is destroyed, your fighters may move up to one space to find a friendly carrier, island or territory on which to land. The landing site must have been controlled by you (or under Allied control) since the beginning of the turn. If your fighters dont find a safe place to land, they are considered lost.

Aircraft Carrier Movement Example The US player wants to move fighter planes from an aircraft carrier in sea zone 10 to attack the Japanese transport and submarine in sea zone 24. The fighters fly three spaces to sea zone 24 ahead of the carrier. On the first round, the fighters roll a 2, scoring a hit and a 4 which is a miss. Japan must select a casualty. Since a fighter may not attack a submarine without a destroyer present, Japan must select the transport as a casualty. The two infantry units aboard are also lost. Japan returns fire with the transport and misses with a 2. The sub cannot fire back because it may not attack air units. Since subs and fighters may not attack each other, the battle is over and the fighters must find a place to land. During the Non-combat Movement phase, the US player moves his aircraft carrier two spaces to sea zone 19. The two fighters then move one space to land back on the carrier. On Japans turn, the Japanese submarine moves into sea zone 19 to attack the US carrier. With its first-strike capability, the sub manages to sink the carrier. (The carrier must be selected as a loss against a sub attack.) The two fighters are considered to be defending in the air, but may not attack the sub. They must now find a place to land that is one space away. Since there is only ocean or the Japanese-held Wake Island one space away, the fighters are also lost.
DESTROYERS Movement: 2 Attack Factor: 3 Defense Factor: 3 Cost: 12 IPCs Description Destroyers attack and defend in sea zones with a die roll of 3 or less. They may also support attacks on enemy-occupied coastal territories or islands. (See Amphibious Assaults section on page 16 for details.) Destroyers are particularly effective against submarines. They eliminate an attacking submarines first-strike ability and also allow friendly air units to attack enemy submarines. If all destroyers in a battle are taken as casualties, then fighter planes lose the ability to attack submarines, and submarines regain their first-strike capability, if applicable. When conducting shore bombardment in support of an Amphibious Assault, destroyers roll a 2 or less to hit, not their normal attack factor of 3 or less.
Japanese Destroyers A Japanese destroyer may transport one infantry unit. When loading or unloading an infantry unit Japanese destroyers follow the same rules as transport ships, summarized below. A Japanese destroyer may carry an infantry across sea zones to other land territories and unload it there. They may unload into a friendly territory during the Non-combat Movement phase. When unloading into an enemy territory during the Combat Movement phase, it is called an Amphibious Assault. (See page 16.) A Japanese destroyer that lands a unit during an Amphibious Assault may not conduct shore bombardment. It may, however, participate in a naval battle prior to the Amphibious Assault being made. The destroyer may move 0, 1 or 2 sea zones, and unload its infantry unit in the same move. The infantry unit may be picked up before, during or after the destroyer moves. During play, units being transported are placed with the destroyer directly in the sea zone. Once a Japanese destroyer unloads, its move is over. An infantry unit may be loaded and unloaded on the same turn. Moving an infantry unit into and out of a destroyer counts as that infantry units full move. The unit may not move to additional territories after landing, nor may it move to a territory and then board a destroyer on the same turn. A destroyer may not load or unload its cargo directly to or from another destroyer or transport.

FIGHTERS Movement: 4 Attack Factor: 3 Defense Factor: 4 Cost: 12 IPCs Description Fighter planes are very strong defensively, although they have a limited flying range of four spaces. Fighters attack with a roll of 3 or less and defend with a roll of 4 or less. Fighters that fly out to attack during the Combat Movement phase, must land during the Non-combat Movement phase. Fighters may also escort friendly bombers or attack enemy air units during Strategic Bombing Raids. (See page 19.) Note: The Hellcats are provided for the American player as well as the green P-38 Lightning. These are both fighters and operate in exactly the same way. Combat Air Patrol (CAP) A fighter plane may establish a Combat Air Patrol CAP during the Non-combat Movement phase. See page 24 for details.
Either way, the combined Allied forces must chose one of their ships as a casualty should the sub have a successful hit. Submarine Combat Example Two Japanese submarines attack an American naval force of one battleship and one destroyer with two submarines. The Japanese player rolls two dice, hoping for a 2 or lower. The roll is two 2s two hits! The American player tips his battleship on its side, showing it has taken one hit. He then selects the destroyer as a casualty, moving it into the Casualties area. Because the destroyer is present, the submarine First-strike rule does not apply. (See page 14). The American player rolls two dice, hoping for a 3 with his destroyer and a 4 with his battleship. The destroyer misses with a 5, but the battleship hits with a 4. Japan loses a submarine. In the second round, the Japanese submarine now gets a first shot because there is no longer a destroyer in the battle. The sub misses with a roll of a 5. The battleship counterattacks, but misses with a 6. Not wishing to push his luck, the Japanese player decides to submerge the remaining submarine and tips it on its side.
Following are some additional fighter plane rules: Fighter planes on an island or island group do not take part in a naval battle in the adjacent, or surrounding, sea zone. Fighters may not be sent on "suicide runs" where they go into combat with no place to land afterward. However, fighters may be sent on "risky" missions. These are combat movements that need an aircraft carrier to move (or survive) in order to land. If, during combat, the aircraft carrier is lost, then the fighters must finish their movements by landing in another safe territory or carrier within range. If unable to do this, the fighters are lost. When fighters are sent on risky missions as described above, you must declare up front where each plane plans to land after combat is complete. For example, you may not move a bunch of fighters into battle assuming some will be lost so that there will be enough room to land the surviving fighters on nearby carriers. If you move a fighter its full four-space range into battle with the intent of landing it on a carrier in that battle, then you may not later decide to retreat this fighter with other units. If you do retreat your other units, the plane is destroyed. It may not land on the carrier when the carrier retreats. Only fighters may land and take off from aircraft carriers. No more than two fighters are allowed on an aircraft carrier. If a fighter on a carrier wants to take off and attack, it must do so from where the carrier is positioned at the start of its turn. When taking off from a carrier, do not count the carriers sea zone as one space.

BOMBERS Movement: 6 Attack Factor: 4 Defense Factor: 1 Cost: 15 IPCs Description Bombers attack with a roll of 4 or less and defend with a roll of 1. Bombers may fly the farthest, but they cost more than fighters. Bombers that fly out to attack during the Combat Movement phase, must land during the Non-Combat Movement phase. Bombers may also conduct Strategic Bombing Raids. (See page 19.) They may not do both on one turn. Bombers must land in a friendly land territory (including an island or island group) within range. They may not land in territories you just captured, nor may they land on aircraft carriers. Bombers may not be sent on "suicide runs" where they go into combat with no place to land afterward.
Note: There are other special rules for fighter planes aboard aircraft carriers. These rules are explained in the Aircraft Carriers section on page 31 & 32.
We will be happy to hear your questions or comments about this game. Write to: Avalon Hill, C/O Hasbro Games, Consumer Affairs Department, P.O. Box 200, Pawtucket, RI 02862 or telephone 888-836-7025 (toll-free). Canadian consumers please write to: Hasbro Canada, P.O. Box 267, Station A, Longueuil, Quebec J4H 3X6. Check us out on the Web: www.avalonhill.com Www.hasbro.com
2000 Avalon Hill Games, Inc., a Hasbro affiliate. 2000 Hasbro, Pawtucket, RI 02862. All Rights Reserved. 41388

doc1

Axis & Allies Pacific 1940 FAQ
May 10, 2010 This is the official FAQ for Axis & Allies Pacific 1940, and it has been approved by Larry Harris. It contains clarifications of answers and additional questions (in red) that are not found in the FAQ on the Avalon Hill website. These additional entries will be added there also, as time and resources allow. This FAQ is provided here in order to make sure that the most recent additions to the FAQ are available to players as soon as possible.

Errata

Setup: The following errors exist in the setup cards: United States: Add an airbase and a naval base to the Philippines. ANZAC: Remove the minor industrial complex from New Zealand, and change the major industrial complex in New South Wales to a minor industrial complex. The Map: Sea zone 5 should not be adjacent to Korea. The border between sea zones 5 and 6 should meet at the border between Amur and Korea, leaving Amur still touching only sea zone 5 but Korea touching only sea zone 6. Page 6, How the War Is Won: The fourth and fifth sentences of the second paragraph should read "Japan wins the game by controlling any 6 of these 8 victory cities (one of which must be Tokyo) at the end of a complete round of play (after the completion of the ANZAC turn). The Allies, Great Britain, the United States, China, and Australia and New Zealand (ANZAC), win the game by controlling the territory of Japan and holding it until the end of the Japanese player's turn following the capture of the territory, as long as they control at least one Allied capital (Western United States, India or New South Wales). Page 8, The Political Situation: This entire section should be replaced with the following: At the beginning of the game, Japan and China are at war. However, none of the other Allied powers begin the game at war with Japan. They remain neutral for the time being, but each will be drawn into the war in turn as certain events unfold. The following rules reflect the growth and development of these historical events from 1940 on. Japan At the beginning of the game, Japan is only at war with China. Japan considers movement of units into China by any other power as an act of war against it. Japan may declare war on any or all Allied powers at the beginning of the Combat Move phase of any of its turns. Japan may attack Dutch territories only if a state of war exists between it and the United Kingdom and ANZAC. Japan may attack French territories at any time, requiring no declaration of war against any Allied power before doing so. The United Kingdom and ANZAC The United Kingdom and ANZAC have a special relationship, and they are treated as one for political purposes. Either power is free to declare war on Japan at the beginning of the Combat Move phase of any of its turns, resulting in a state of war between both powers and Japan. Neither power may move units into China unless a state of war exists between them and Japan. These two powers also have an arrangement with the Dutch government in exile (Holland having been captured by Germany) and have taken guardianship of the Dutch territories in the Pacific. As a result, they are free to move units into these territories as a noncombat movement at any time, as long as they have not yet been captured by Japan. They may actually take control of them (gaining their IPC income) by moving land units into them. Additionally, the United Kingdom

and ANZAC consider attacks against any Dutch territories to be acts of war against them directly. Once a Dutch territory has been captured by Japan, however, it may be captured and controlled by any power. The United States The United States may not declare war on Japan unless Japan first declares war on it or makes an unprovoked declaration of war against the United Kingdom or ANZAC. However, if the United States is still not at war with Japan by the Collect Income phase of its third turn, it may declare war on Japan at that time. Representing a switch from a peacetime to wartime economy, the American player collects an additional 40 IPCs. This wartime economy takes effect during the first U.S. turn in which it is at war with Japan, regardless of the event that triggered the state of war. France France's capital has been captured by Germany. As a result, French territories are treated in the same way as any Allied territories whose capital is held by an enemy power (see Liberating a Territory, pg. 18). The Soviet Union The Soviet Union has entered into a non-aggression treaty with Japan. As a result, no units from any power on either side may enter Soviet territories at any time. Page 10, Phase 1: Purchase & Repair Units: The second sentence of the first paragraph should read "All the units listed in the mobilization zone on the game board are available for purchase by all powers, except for China, which has limited purchasing options (see page 9)." Page 17, Step 4. Defending Units Fire (Land and Sea Battles): "Defending units roll one die for each unit with a defense value, including units behind the casualty strip, that did not fire in step 2." Page 20 - Collect Income: The last sentence of the first paragraph should read "However, before you can actually receive any income, you must check for any losses incurred by naval attacks against your shipping routes (see below)." Page 20 - Collect Income Conduct Convoy Disruptions: The third condition for a convoy disruption should read "At least one warship belonging to a power with which you are at war must be in the sea zone." Page 21 - National Objectives & Bonus Income - Japan: The first bullet point should read "Gain 5 IPCs: Control Sumatra, Java, Celebes and Borneo at the same time." Page 21 - National Objectives & Bonus Income - United States: The first bullet point should read "Representing a switch from a peacetime to wartime economy, gain 40 IPCs if the U.S. is at war with Japan." Page 22, Industrial Complexes (cardboard counter) Unit Characteristics: The third and fourth sentences should be replaced with "The major industrial complexes have a 10 printed on them. The final sentence should read Industrial complexes cannot be built on islands (Japan is the exception). (Australia is not an island.) Page 24, Artillery Unit Characteristics: This paragraph should read: Supports Infantry and Mechanized Infantry: When an infantry or mechanized infantry attacks along with an artillery, its attack increases to 2. Each infantry and/or mechanized infantry must be matched one-for-one with a supporting artillery unit. Artillery does not support infantry or mechanized infantry on defense.

May10,2010

Axis&AlliesPacific1940FAQ
Page 24, Mechanized Infantry: The Attack value should read 1 (2 when supported by artillery). The following paragraph should be added to Unit Characteristics: Supported by Artillery: When mechanized infantry attacks along with an artillery, the mechanized infantrys attack increases to 2. Each mechanized infantry must be matched one-for-one with a supporting artillery unit. If your mechanized infantry outnumber your artillery, the excess mechanized infantry units still have an attack of 1. For example, if you attack with two artillery and five mechanized infantry, two of your mechanized infantry have an attack of 2 and the rest have an attack of 1. Mechanized infantry are not supported by artillery on defense.
Special Comments and Clarifications Related to Neutral Powers
The United States begins the game neutral and is initially not considered part of the Allies, though it does have Allied sympathies. The United Kingdom and ANZAC are at war with Germany, on the other side of the world, but not with Japan. While Japan is considered to be on the opposite side from these powers, they are not considered to be enemies. While they remain neutral toward each other, these powers have some special conditions and restrictions on what they can and cannot do. The United States, being at war with no one and having a strict isolationist policy, has especially tight restrictions. A power may never attack a territory controlled by or containing units belonging to a power with which it is not at war. In the event that a power at war attacks a sea zone containing units belonging to a power with which it is already at war and units belonging to a power with which it is not at war, the latter power's units are ignored. Those units will not participate in the battle in any way, and a state of war with that power will not result. A powers ships do not block naval movements of other powers with which it is not at war, nor are they blocked by them. They can occupy the same sea zone. In addition to these restrictions, when not at war the United States may not attack neutral territories. It also may not move units into territories or onto ships belonging to another power or use another power's naval bases. This includes Dutch territories. Also, no other power may move land or air units into the United States' territories or onto its ships or use its naval bases. If a power is not yet at war with another power, and there are no restrictions currently keeping them from being at war (see The Political Situation on pg. 8), it may declare war on that power. This must be done on the declaring power's turn at the beginning of the Combat Move phase, before any combat movements are made, unless otherwise specified in the political rules (see pg. 8). An actual attack is not required. Once war is declared, all territories and sea zones controlled by or containing units belonging to the power or powers on which war is declared instantly become hostile, and the normal rules of moving into or through hostile spaces apply. Important exception During the combat movement phase following the announced declaration of war, transports already in sea zones that have just become hostile may be loaded in those sea zones (but not in other hostile sea zones). This may occur only during the first Combat Move phase following the announced declaration of war. Once that initial combat movement phase is over, normal transport loading restrictions apply.

The Map

Q. Does sea zone 6 connect to Manchuria? A. No. Q. Are the Canadian territories (Yukon Territory and British Columbia) controlled by the United Kingdom? A. Yes.
Q. Is New Zealand an island? A. Yes. Even though it touches the edge of the map, itis an island territory because it touches only a single sea zone and no other territory. Q. Are islands that appear on the map but have no name label, such as the one in sea zone 1, game spaces? Can I land units on them? A. No. If an island is not named, its not a game space.

Movement

Q. I'm a bit uncertain about how far air units can move. How exactly do you count air unit movement points? A. The important thing to remember here is that every time a unit crosses a boundary between spaces, it uses one movement point. A fighter taking off from one island and landing on another island in an adjacent sea zone will use three movement points one to enter the sea zone that the original island is in, one to move to the next sea zone, and one to move to the destination island in that sea zone. In a similar example, if that fighter were doing the same thing except taking off from a carrier in the original sea zone instead of an island, it would use only two movement points because it's already in the origination sea zone rather than on an island within it. Since it's starting from the sea zone rather than the island, it only crosses two space boundaries during its movement. Q. None of the Allied powers may move units into China when they are not at war with Japan. Does this include moving air units through China on their way to somewhere else? A. Yes, it does. Allied powers may not move air units through original Chinese territories unless they are at war with Japan. Q. Lets say Im doing an amphibious assault and there are no enemy ships in the sea zone around the island Im attacking, but the island has an airbase and enemy fighters. Can I move extra ships and planes into the sea zone along with my transports that wont support the assault just in case my opponent decides to scramble the fighters to defend the sea zone? What about if theres only an enemy sub in the sea zone? Can I move a destroyer in along with my transport just to keep the sub from getting a free shot at it, even though the destroyer will not participate in the assault? A. Yes, in both cases. You may move units into a sea that presents a danger to your units during combat movement, even though they may not actually end up fighting. Just the chance that there will be combat is enough to allow it.

Kamikaze Attacks and Scrambling
Q. Can kamikaze attacks be done during Japans turn? A. No. Kamikaze attacks are a defensive action, so they may only be used during Allied powers turns. Q. Do kamikaze attacks require a Japanese air unit to be used and destroyed? A. No. The Japanese player must simply discard one kamikaze token for each attack. Q. If Japan is going to both use kamikaze and scramble fighters in the same sea zone, which one happens first? Can I see the results of my kamikaze attacks before I decide how many air units to scramble? A. Since all movement must be completed before any combat occurs, scrambling must be done before kamikaze attacks are resolved. Q. Can I scramble fighters or tactical bombers from Queensland or Western United States? A. No. They can only be scrambled from island territories with airbases. An island is a single territory completely surrounded by a single sea zone.

Combat

Q. Aircraft carriers have an attack vaIue of zero. Does this mean that they cant attack other units and can only be used defensively in battles? A. No. They can participate in an attack and take hits just like any other warship. They just dont get an attack roll. Q. Can attacking aircraft carriers alone automatically destroy defenseless transports? A. No, because they have no attack value. Q. I'm a little confused about how transports work in combat. Could you explain when they can be taken as casualties and how "defenseless" transports work? A. Transports are a part of a sea combat, just like other sea units. They are participants in combat, not bystanders. A combat involving transports plays out like any other combat, with three exceptions. The first exception is that transports don't roll combat dice. As a result, they will never hit anything. They must rely on combat units for protection. The second exception is that transports may only be taken as casualties when there is no other choice. In other words, they can't be used as "cannon fodder". Combat units protect transports, not the other way around. The final exception is that when it gets to the point where only one side is rolling dice, and it's only a matter of time before the other side's transports are destroyed, you can stop rolling dice and remove the transports. The sole point of the defenseless transport rule is to keep you from rolling potentially endless dice until you kill all of the helpless transports. This is the only time that transports are ever automatically destroyed. A classic example of the defenseless transport rule is a fighter attacking a lone transport. You could roll a die again and again until you roll a 3 or less while the transport doesn't return fire. The defenseless transport rule simply allows you to forego the rolls and remove the transport automatically. Remember, it takes a dedicated combat action to destroy even a defenseless transport, so a ship or plane can't simply move through a sea zone and destroy it in passing. It must end its combat move there and declare an attack. Let's look at another, more complex, example of transports in combat. An attacking force consisting of two bombers, a destroyer and two loaded transports is attempting an amphibious assault. The sea zone is defended by a destroyer and two submarines. In the first combat round, all of the attacking units fire and get one hit. The defender takes the destroyer as the casualty and returns fire, missing with his destroyer but rolling snake eyes for his subs and scoring two hits! The attacker must take his destroyer for the first hit, since subs can't hit planes and transports must be taken last as casualties. The second hit must now be taken on a transport, since that's the only eligible unit remaining. The attacker is now in a sticky situation. He has only two bombers and a transport remaining against two defending subs. Since the bombers can no longer hit the subs (the attacker doesn't have a destroyer), and the subs can't hit the bombers, the only effective firing going on will be the subs firing on the transport. It's only a matter of time before the subs sink the transport, but the transport can still retreat before it is hit, so it's not defenseless. The attacker's only real option at this point is to retreat before the remaining transport is destroyed.

Submarines

Q. Can a defending submarine submerge before an attacking sub fires on it? A. Yes. The decision whether to submerge is made before any dice are rolled, and the submerging subs are removed from the battle immediately. Of course, if the attacker has a destroyer, the defending sub may not submerge at all.
Q. If a US fleet attacks a Japanese sub, and a UK destroyer is in the same sea zone, will it cancel the special abilities of the Japanese sub, even though the UK destroyer doesn't participate in the battle? A. No. Units in the same sea zone belonging to a power allied to the attacker never participate in a battle in any way. Only a destroyer belonging to the attacking power will cancel the Submersible, Surprise Strike and Cannot Be Hit by Air Units abilities of defending submarines. However, since all defending units in the sea zone participate in the battle, any defending destroyer will cancel these abilities of attacking subs, even if the destroyer and fighter belong to different powers. Q. Let's say I attack a sea zone that contains both enemy subs and surface warships. If at some point during the battle, all of the enemy surface warships are sunk and only subs remain, can I ignore the subs and end the battle? A. No. Subs (and/or transports) can only be ignored during movement, and you can only ignore them when there are no surface warships in the sea zone with them. When you attack a sea zone, you attack all of the enemy units in that sea zone. Q. Assume there's a sea zone that contains an enemy sub and cruiser, and that I attack it with a destroyer and a fighter. If the defender scores two hits in the first combat round, can I take the hit from the cruiser on my destroyer, saving my fighter, since the sub cant hit it? A. No. Because you have a destroyer, the defenders sub rolls in Step 4 along with his or her cruiser. Since both defending units roll in the same combat step and all dice are rolled in a step before applying casualties, the two hits are applied together. Therefore, you must apply both hits if possible. The only way to apply both hits is to take the cruiser hit on your fighter and the sub hit on your destroyer. Q. Submarines can attack transports that move through their sea zone unaccompanied by surface warships. Under exactly what conditions do surface warships prevent sub attacks on moving transports? A. In order to prevent sub attacks, a transport or group of transports must make its entire move accompanied by a specific surface warship or group of surface warships. Each transport or group of transports that is not escorted will be fired upon once by each sub in the sea zone. Q. If a power with which Im not at war moves an unescorted transport through a sea zone where I have a submarine, can I attack it? A. No.

Mobilizing New Units

Q. If I upgrade a minor industrial complex to a major one, how many units can it mobilize on the same turn that its upgraded? A. Three. Just as you cant mobilize units from a new industrial complex, you cant use the increased mobilization capacity from the upgrade until your next turn. Q. If I purchased units that I cant mobilize because of production limitations, what happens to the excess units? A. They are returned to the box, and the IPCs are refunded to you.
Collecting Income and Convoy Disruptions
Q. Do I get the bonus IPCs for any National Objectives that I start out meeting at the beginning of the game added to my starting IPCs? A. No. Bonus IPCs for meeting National Objectives are awarded during the Collect Income phase of your turn. You will receive your first bonus payment during that phase of your first turn.
Q. What is the maximum number of IPCs that the United States can lose in a turn from convoy disruptions in sea zone 10 when it is at war? Can the extra 40 IPCs that it gets be lost in this way? A. Since the additional 40 IPCs is National Objective income and doesnt come directly from a territory, it may not be lost to convoy disruptions. The maximum amount that the U.S. can lose in sea zone 10 is 12 IPCs (10 for Western United States plus 2 for Mexico). Q. If Japan captures Western United States, does its income increase by 50 IPCs? A. No. Japan would receive 10 IPCs income from the territory. Since the additional 40 IPCs is National Objective income and doesnt come directly from the territory, only the U.S. may receive it.

Miscellaneous

Q. The battle strip has different combat values than the rulebook for some of the units, and it doesnt have mechanized infantry or tactical bombers on it at all. Is the battle strip incorrect? A. Unfortunately, the battle strip for Axis & Allies 1942 Edition was included in this game by mistake. The unit combat values in the rulebook are correct. If you wish, you may contact Wizards Customer Service at the address or telephone number on the back of the Rulebook to request a replacement battle strip. Q. Can I upgrade a minor industrial complex to a major one if it has been damaged? A. Yes, but only if you repair the damage at the same time that you purchase the upgrade. Q. When I capture a territory with an antiaircraft gun in it, do I get to keep it even if it belonged to one of my allies before it was captured by the enemy? What about if I liberate one of my ally's territories that has an antiaircraft gun in it? A. Once an antiaircraft gun is captured, any claim of ownership on it by former owners is gone. If you capture it, it's yours, no matter who owned it in the past. If you capture a territory, you capture any AA guns in it. However, if you liberate a territory, any AA guns in it will go to your ally along with the liberated territory. In other words, control of AA guns always transfers along with control of the territory they're in. There is, however, one exception to this rule. Say ANZAC has an AA gun in New Guinea, and Japan captures both New Guinea and New South Wales (the ANZAC capital). If the United States takes New Guinea from Japan, it gets to keep both New Guinea and the AA gun, since ANZAC's capital is held by the enemy. If the United States then liberates New South Wales, ANZAC gets New Guinea back, but the United States gets to keep the AA gun there. This is the only time that a territory can change hands without any AA guns in it changing hands along with it.

 

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