Reviews & Opinions
Independent and trusted. Read before buy Kurzweil PC88 Made Easy!

Kurzweil PC88 Made Easy

Manual

Download (English)
Instruction: After click Download and complete offer, you will get access to list of direct links to websites where you can download this manual.

About

Kurzweil KFP-2M Double Piano-Style Footswitch PC88/K2000
The Kurzweil KFP-2m Double Piano-Style Footswitch has 2 mono plugs. Works with all Kurzweil keyboards and digital pianos except SP series and Troubador.

Details
Brand: Kurzweil
Part Number: KFP-2M
UPC: 889406017498


Here you can find all about Kurzweil PC88 Made Easy, for example manual and review. You can also write a review.

 

[ Report abuse or wrong photo | Share your Kurzweil PC88 Made Easy photo ]

Video review

YoungChang Kurzweil PC88 ROMDEMO( PC88 ROM )

 

User reviews and opinions

<== Click here to post a new opinion, comment, review, etc.

Comments to date: 7. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
ya_akov 5:30am on Sunday, August 15th, 2010 
Overall, I would take this phone over the Droid. I think that the form factor, and Sense UI really help for the consumer. I think that the Droid. its a great phone if you know how to use it. needs an update to 2.0/2.1 and its just about perfect from my point of view. great design.
writergirl 8:53am on Sunday, July 11th, 2010 
i got this flew in from the US and i must say it looked good as i brought it out, i was even impressed by the apps it had on the phone.
philippeP 10:26pm on Wednesday, June 30th, 2010 
I have always wanted a smart phone that was not outdated by the time my two year contract was up.
dptech 10:34am on Thursday, May 20th, 2010 
BUYER BEWARE - This phone is not compatible with North American 3G bands. All in all I love this phone, only one I can think that is better is the Samsung I9000 Galaxy S. OK. First to all the people who say that this is different than the verizon model; do some reasearch before you post. Second.
Brazilgirl 12:28am on Tuesday, May 11th, 2010 
Great cover,durable,bright color,fast shipment,very pleased with purchase. love the pink sparkle cover. Thanks! Fits the phone perfectly This item is mislabeled. It is not for motorolal, it is for iphone only!
mwolfe 12:52am on Thursday, May 6th, 2010 
Great phone, however, the user interface could be better; I get tried of the on off switch to answer a phone call. I would like to see more service in my town, granted I bought them for use while I was at work.
ahoch 2:08pm on Monday, April 19th, 2010 
really like it, have had it for over a month and it holds up well and is very pretty. great buy!

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

Zone Parameters Almost all of the editing features of the PC88 are accessed through this section. Under each button is a series of parameters, which you access using the << and >> buttons under the display. You then use the Data Entry section to change the value of the currently displayed parameter.
1. Press the MIDI Transmit Button. The display shows that you are on the MIDI Channel parameter. 2. Press the >> button. You are now on the Destination parameter, which by default is set to Local+MIDI. 3. Press the - button under the alpha wheel. The value changes to MIDI. Rotate the wheel clockwise. It changes back to Local+MIDI. Notice that there is an underscore below the letter L in the display. This shows that the parameter is highlighted. Usually there is only one parameter in the display at a time, but sometimes there are two. 4. Press the KeyRange button. There are two parameters in the display - Low Note and High Note. Notice the underscore under the C. Press the >> button and you will see the underscore move under the G.
Zone Select The four zone select buttons have two functions. When playing a Setup, they allow you to mute and unmute zones. When you are editing a Setup, they allow you to switch between zones for editing. Since the display has only two lines, there is only enough room to show the value of 1 zone at a time. 1. Press the MIDI Setups button, then press 1 on the numeric keypad, then press Enter. You have called up Setup 001 A Piano Trio. On the bottom line of the display, after A01, it should say 1:Stage Piano 440. If it doesnt, press the Zone 1 button once and you will see this info. This shows you the Program that is on zone 1. 2. Notice that the Zone 1 and Zone 2 buttons are green. This tells you the Setup has 2 zones. If you play the keyboard, you will hear Piano on the right side and Bass+Ride Cymbal on the left. 3. Press the Zone 1 button. It now turns orange. This means that zone is muted. If you play the keyboard, the right side makes no sound. Press Zone 1 and the button turns green again and you will hear the piano. 4. Press the Zone 2 button. The bottom line of the display now says A01 2:Leg Bass &Ride, showing you the Program in zone 2. An important point that can lead to confusion: If a specific zone is NOT currently in the display, pressing that Zone Select button will bring up that zone in the display. But if the Zone is already in the display, then pressing the same numbered Zone Select button will mute it. 5. Press the MIDI Transmit button. The top line now shows Zone 2 0:061. When you are editing any parameter the top line always shows you the current zone, as well as the bank and program number of the program assigned to that zone (in this case, it is the Internal Voices bank 0, Program 61 - Legato Bass & Ride. The bottom line says MIDI Channel:02. showing you zone 2 is assigned to channel 2.

6. Press the Zone 1 button. It shows you that zone 1 has program 17 from the Internal Voices bank and is assigned to channel 1. 7. Press the Zone 1 button again. Notice that the Zone 1 button turns orange - the zone is muted. The display also shows a - after the zone number in the display. The mute function works both when playing and editing a Setup. This can be useful when you are creating your Setups - you can temporarily mute a zone to hear the others. Press the Zone 1 button again to unmute the zone. 8. Press the Solo button. The Zone 1 button turns red, showing that zone is soloed. If you play the keyboard you will only hear the piano. Press the Zone 2 button. It switches to red and the Zone 1 button to green, soloing the bass sound.
Effects This section is very simple. You can select an effects setting for each Program by pressing the appropriate buttons. Pressing a button repeatedly toggles through the values of that button. Additional effects parameters are available through the Effects menu in the Zone parameters section. Those will be covered in Tutorial #12. There are two basic parameters for Reverb - Room Type and Quality. The first button choose the Room Type and the second button chooses the Quality. If you press the Room Type button enough times so that you turn it off, the Quality button will also turn off (since no reverb is selected). The third button lets you choose Chorus or Delay. You can have both Reverb and Chorus/ Delay or either one alone. In Internal Voices mode, each program can have its own effects settings. No special saving procedure is necessary - the PC88 simply remembers the last setting you chose for that particular program. This applies to all the programs, including the ones on the VGM board. 1. Press the Internal Voices button, then 1 on the numeric keypad, then Enter, to choose the Stage Piano program. Assuming you have not changed the default effects settings, they will be set to Stage Bright Reverb. If not, switch the values so that they are set to Stage Bright. 2. Press the Quality button so that it switches from Bright to Normal. 3. Press 3 on the numeric keypad and then Enter, to choose the Digital E. Piano program. The effects switch to Room Bright Reverb plus Chorus 1. 4. Press 1 on the numeric keypad, then Enter. Notice it returns to Stage Normal, instead of Stage Bright, its original setting. In MIDI Setups mode, things are slightly more complicated. In order for the effects settings to be remembered, you must go through the Store process (which will be covered in the tutorial section). Even more important, since there is only one effects processor in the basic PC88, plus one more on the VGM board, you can only have one or two different effects settings in a setup. No matter how many zones you have, any zones which use a program from the Internal Voices bank will have the same settings, and any zones which use a program 5

still follow the example, using the E, F, and G buttons in the Assignable Controllers area to do the same thing.
1. Layering Two or More Programs
To play two or more programs, you must create a Setup with a zone for each program, and each zone set to a different MIDI channel. 1. Press the MIDI Setups button, then type 127, then press Enter on the numeric keypad. 2. Press the MIDI Transmit button. If the display doesnt show Zone 1, press the Zone 1 button. Press 1, then Enter. The button will now be lit green and the display will show it is set to channel 1. 3. Press the Program button. Choose the Program you want for the first zone. You can select it by using the alpha wheel, the + and - buttons, or the numeric keypad. (The programs and their numbers are listed in Appendices A & B in the manual.) Or you can use the Sound Select and Next/ Previous Group buttons, as described at the beginning of this document. 4. Step 3 will allow you to choose any program from the Internal Voice bank. But if you have the VGM board and want to choose a program from one of the VGM banks, then you need to switch banks. There are two ways to do this. If you know exactly which program you want, then the fastest way is to type the bank number, followed by the +/ button, followed by the program number, then Enter. - (The bank numbers were listed at the beginning of this document.) OR If you want to scroll through the programs in a bank, press the << button to get to the Bank parameter. Use the alpha wheel to choose the bank you want. Then press the >> button to get back to the Program parameter and use the alpha wheel to scroll through the programs in that bank. 5. Now that you have chosen your first sound, you will choose your layered sound. Press the MIDI Transmit button, then press the Zone 2 button. Notice that the channel is set to Off and the Zone 2 button is unlit. Set it to channel 2. (You can actually choose any channel but 1, since 1 is being used by zone 1.) The Zone 2 button turns green, showing that it is active. 6. Press the Program button. Repeat steps 3 or 4 to assign a program for your second layer. Play the keyboard. You should hear both sounds together. Notice that the sustain pedal works for both layers. 7. If you want to add a third or fourth layer, j ust repeat steps 5 and 6. (Just make sure to choose a different MIDI channel for each zone.) 8. Thats it!. Now all you have to do is Name and Store your Setup. Press Store. The display says Replace Setup 127?. Press the >> button so that the display says Rename Setup 127?. Press Enter. Now you are in the naming routine. You will see an underline cursor under the first character (D). Press the <<< or >>> soft buttons to move the cursor. Press a button on the numeric keypad one or more times

to enter a character above the cursor. The characters that correspond to the alphanumeric buttons are labeled under each button. If the character that appears is not the one you want, press the button again. For example, pressing 1 once will choose an A. Pressing it again will choose B, and one more time will choose C. Press the +/ button on the alphanumeric pad to switch between upper and lower case characters. Press 0 one or more times to enter the numerals 0 through 9. Press CLEAR (on the alphanumeric keypad) to erase the selected character without moving any other characters. To insert a space, press the E button in the Assignable Controllers section. To delete a character press the F button, and to move the cursor instantly to the end of the name in the display, press the G button. In addition to letter and number characters there are numerous other characters you can choose. For example, if you layered piano and strings, you might want to name your Setup Piano & Strings. You can choose these characters by scrolling with the alpha wheel or the + and - buttons. At the end of this document, is a list of all the characters and the order in which they appear. Once you have the name the way you want it, press Enter. 9. The PC88 now j umps back to the Store dialog. The display will read Replace Setup 127?. You dont want to save over the preset Setup 127, since you will want to have it available as a template to start from. So choose a different number. If you havent saved anything yet, you will find empty locations between 33 and 125 if you have a PC88 or 65 and 125 if you have a PC88MX. If you are on a blank location, the display will change to say Save Setup xx? (xx is the number you have chosen). Now press Enter. Congratulations - you have created and stored your first Setup! A programming note: The steps above take the approach of editing all the parameters in one zone, then going to the next zone and editing the parameters for that zone. But you can also work by editing the same parameter for all zones, then going to the next parameter and editing that for all zones. For instance, you could go to the MIDI Transmit page and set the MIDI channel for each zone (by pressing the Zone Select buttons, then go to the Program parameter and choose the programs in each zone. Either way of working is j ust as valid - it all depends on how you want to work! All of the tutorials here use the approach of setting all the parameters for one zone at a time, to help minimize confusion. Just remember to always check the zone number in the display so you are aware of which zone you are editing.
2. Splitting Two or More Programs
1. Go through steps 1-4 in tutorial #1. 2. Press the Key Range button. The display will show the key range for zone 1, from C-1 to G9. (C4 is middle C on the keyboard.) You are going to make zone 1 be the right side of the split, so you need to change the lowest note for this zone. The cursor is already under the Low Note parameter. So, simply press and hold the Enter button, then strike the key on the keyboard that you want to be the lowest note for the right side of the split. The display will change to show that note. 3. Go through steps 5 and 6 in tutorial #1 to create the second part of your split. 4. Press the Key Range button. Since zone 2 is the left side of your split, you need to change the high note so that it doesnt overlap with zone 1. Press the >> to move the cursor to the High Note parameter. Press and hold the Enter button, then strike the note on the keyboard that is one note lower than the note you chose for the lowest note in zone 1. Play the keyboard. You should hear the two sounds split at the notes you chose. 5. Notice that if you press the sustain pedal when playing both sides of the split, both sides sustain. Although this might be fine in some circumstances, often you wont want this. For example, if you create a piano and bass split, you will probably want the piano part to sustain, but not the bass. Hold the Controllers button and step on the sustain pedal. The display j umps to show Zone:2 SwitchPdl1, Sw Type:Momentary. Press the >> to get to the On Control parameter for Switch Pedal 1. Currently it is set to Sustain. Press 0, then Enter to set it to None. Now play the keyboard and notice how the sound in zone 1 will sustain but the sound in zone 2 does not. 6. Go through steps 8 and 9 in tutorial #1 to name and save your Setup. You can easily add zones 3 and 4 using the same methods. Each zone can be set to any range of notes, so you can have various zones layered while they are split with other zones. Or create a 3 or 4 way split. Or overlap the zones only partially.

5. Returning Volume Levels to Full Values when Exiting a Setup
OK, so now you have created a Setup with the sliders set to control volume. Lets say that you are performing a song and you have faded out one or more zones and you go to a new Setup. You play the keyboard but dont hear the sounds on those zones! Keep in mind that all controller information is channel specific. Once a MIDI channel received a message for a controller (like Volume with a value of 0), that MIDI channel stays at that same amount until it either gets a new value of that controller, or it gets the Reset All Controllers message (this is Controller 123, and is sent when you press the Panic button). To avoid this problem, you can use Exit values. 1. Call up the Setup you created in tutorial #4. 2. Hold the Controllers button and move Slider A. If the display doesnt show Zone:1, press the zone 1 button. Press the >> button 5 times. The display should now read Zone:1 Slider A, Exit Value:None. Set the value to 127. 3. Hold the Controllers button and move Slider B. Press the zone 2 button. Press the >> button 5 times. The display should now read Zone:2 Slider B, Exit Value:None. Set the value to 127. 4. Resave your Setup by pressing the Store button. (You can save it back to the same location.) Now when you leave this Setup, the volume on channels 1 and 2 returns to the full amount, no matter where you have moved the sliders. Using Exit values is always a good idea when assigning volume to controllers, but it can have many other uses as well. For example, it could be used to turn off the arpeggiator, or return panning to center, etc.
6. Adjusting Relative Volumes with One Slider
So far we have only shown assigning a controller to one zone. But there is no reason that you cant use one controller to affect two or more zones. Lets say that you want to create a Setup with three layered zones - Piano, Electric Piano, & Strings. Furthermore, lets say you need to control the Piano and Electric Piano volumes separately, but you want to have the Strings volume controlled with the same slider you use to control the Electric Piano. In addition, you need the Strings to always be quieter than the Electric Piano. 1. Follow tutorial #1 to create a 3 zone, layered Setup, with Piano in zone 1, Electric Piano in zone 2, and Strings in zone 3. 2. Hold the Controllers button and move Slider A. If the display is not on zone 1, press the Zone 1 button. The display now shows Zone:1 Slider A, Ctrl Num:None. Press 7, then Enter to assign Slider A to Volume. 3. Press the Zone 2 button Hold the Controllers button and move Slider B. The display now shows Zone:1 Slider B, Ctrl Num:None. Press 7, then Enter to assign Slider B to Volume. 4. Press the Zone 3 button. Press 7, then Enter to assign Slider B to Volume. Play the keyboard and move the two sliders. Notice that Slider B controls the volume on both zones 2 and 3. But the strings are still as loud as the electric piano. 5(a). Press the >> button twice. The display now shows Zone:3 Slider B, Ctrl Offset:0. Press the +/ button, then 37, then Enter. The Offset will now be set to -37. The Offset parameter will subtract (or add if the number is positive) a specific amount to the normal value of the slider. So when the slider is all the way up, the value is 12737=90. So as you move the slider up and down, the strings are always 37 less in volume than the electric piano. As you move the slider down to the normal 37 position, the volume level for the strings would be 37-37=0. What happens when you move the slider lower? MIDI can only send values between 0 and 127, so once the value reaches 0, the slider doesnt send any additional messages as you move it lower. 5(b). There is a second way to accomplish the same thing, although the end results will be slightly different. You should still be on the Offset parameter for Zone 3. Set it back to 0 so there is no Offset, and press the << button once. The display now shows Zone:3 Slider B, Ctrl Scale:100%. Press 71, then Enter. The Scale parameter applies a percentage to the normal slider value. So if you move the slider all the way up, the value will be 127 x.71=90.17 (since MIDI only send integer values this will be rounded to 90). So when the slider is all the way up, it is sending the same value as the example above using Offset.

same level as when the slider is all the way up or down. Try setting both zones to Linear and hold notes while you move the slider, and compare that to using the Sine+ and Cosine+ curves. You should be able to hear a difference.

8. Velocity Switching

You can use how hard you strike the key to switch between zones. This is usually most effective if you have programs that have samples of the same instrument at different velocity levels. The PC88 doesnt have programs which are like this, so you would most likely use this technique when controlling an external module. But the following example demonstrates the technique with internal PC88 sounds. 1. Create a Setup with two zones, following tutorial #1. Assign Program #44 Marimba to zone 1 and #60 Metal marimba to zone 2. 2. Press the Velocity button. If you are not on zone 1, press the Zone 1 button. Press the >> button 3 times. The minimum velocity for this zone is 1. Press the >> button again. Change the maximum velocity to 80. Press the Solo button so you hear only zone 1. Play the keyboard with varying degrees of force. The marimba gets louder as you strike harder until you reach a velocity of 80, then it does not play at all. 3. Press the Zone 2 button. The maximum velocity is set to 127. Press the << button to go back to the Vel Min parameter. Set it to 81. Play the keyboard with varying degrees of force. Notice you hear no sound until you reach a velocity of 81, then zone 2 continues to get louder as you play up to 127. Press the Solo button again to hear both zones. Play the keyboard to hear the switching between the two zones. Another useful application is to add a zone with velocity. You could create a 2 zone layered Setup. For one zone, you leave it to play through all velocities. But for the second zone, you change the MinVel parameter so that zone only kicks in above a certain velocity. Now when you play the keyboard, you hear one zone or two, depending on how hard you strike the keys. This is great for adding a little extra kick to a sound, if you add some type of short percussive program for the second zone. You may also want to set the volume for that zone lower than the first zone (as described in tutorial #4) so that the effect of adding the second zone is more subtle.
9. Switching from One Setup to Another With a Pedal
If you need to switch between Setups very quickly in performance, it can be useful to do this with a switch pedal. To do the following tutorial, you will need a switch pedal plugged into the Switch Pedal 2 j ack in the PC88. (You could use Switch Pedal 1, but then you wouldnt be able to use it for Sustain.) 1. Create a Setup with one or more zones, following tutorial #1. 2. Hold the Controllers button and step on the pedal connected to the Switch Pedal 2 j ack. The display will read Zone:1 SwitchPdl 2, SW Type: Momentary. If the display shows a different Zone, that is OK. Only one zone is needed to accomplish what you want to do, and it can be any zone, as long as the zone is active. 3a. Press the >> button, so that you are on the OnCtrl parameter. Press 137, then Enter to select GoTo Setup for the value. In addition to the 128 MIDI controller messages, there are a number of special functions that can be assigned to a physical controller. They are listed on pages 5-13 & 5-14 of the manual. You can scroll up to them with the alpha wheel, or enter specific numbers (documented in the manual) to go directly to them. 4a. Press the >> button to get to the On Value parameter. Choose a Setup number that you want to jump to from this Setup. Enter that number as the value for this parameter. 3b-4b. Another option is to use the Setup Increment function instead of the GoTo Setup. In this case, you would type 135, then Enter when on the On Ctrl parameter, then set On Value to 127. This option will cause the PC88 to select the next higher numbered Setup, when you Step on the pedal. You could also use another pedal and assign it to Setup Decrement. Then the two pedals would allow you to step through the setups in ascending or descending order. (But of course, you would need to assign the pedals to these values in each Setup.) 5. Name & Save your Setup. It is important you save your Setup before testing the pedal, since stepping on the pedal will cause you to leave the current Setup and if it isnt saved, you will have to program it again. Now step on the pedal. You should see the PC88 j ump to the Setup that you have chosen. Instead of using a pedal, you could accomplish the same thing assigning the GoTo Setup to the E, F, or G controller buttons, but of course, then you have to take your fingers off the keys.

10. Switching from One Program to Another with a Pedal
If you have created a multiple zone Setup and only want to change a single program, you can use the GoTo Program function instead of using the GoTo Setup function. This can be useful if you dont want to make a bunch of extra Setups. It is also great for switching back and forth between two programs while keeping the other zones the same. This tutorial will be set up so that you can switch back and forth. The limitation for this tutorial is that the program that you switch to must be in the same bank as the program you are switching from. 1. Create a multiple zone Setup, following tutorial #1. For the purposes of this tutorial, make sure that the program that you want to switch from is in the Internal Voices Bank. (The programs in the other zones can be in any bank.) Also for the purposes of this tutorial, we will assume you will use zone 1 as the zone that will switch programs. You will need to remember the program number of the program you choose for zone 1 - you will type in that number in step 6. 2. Hold the Controllers button and step on the pedal connected to the Switch Pedal 2 j ack. If you are not on zone 1, press the Zone 1 button. The display will now read Zone:1 SwitchPdl 2, SW Type: Momentary. Use the alpha wheel to switch the value to Toggle. The difference between Momentary and Toggle is: A Momentary switch is On while you press it and Off when you let go (like a typical sustain pedal). A Toggle Switch stays On when you press and let go and then turns Off when you press again (like a typical power switch). 3. Press the >> button. Press 134, then Enter to choose GoTo Program for the On Ctrl. 4. Press the >> button. Enter the program number of the program you want to switch to. It must be a program in the current bank (the Internal Voices bank for this tutorial). 5. Press the >> button. Notice that the OffCtrl value is set to GoTo Program (the same as On Ctrl). Although the On Ctrl and Off Ctrl parameters can be set to send different messages, you would normally expect them to send the same control message (but with different values for On and Off). For this reason, whenever you set the On Ctrl parameter, it also sets the Off Ctrl to the same thing. So if you want a different value for Off Ctrl, you must set it after setting the On Ctrl parameter. We will see an example of this in the next tutorial. 6. Press the >> button. Enter the number of the program that you originally assigned for zone 1 (the same number you set with the Program parameter). 7. Name and Save your Setup. Now play the setup, then step on the pedal. You should hear the sound from zone 1 switch to your second sound. Step on the pedal and play again. You should hear the original zone 1 sound again.

11. Switching Banks & Programs with a Pedal
A limitation of the GoTo Program function described in the previous tutorial is that it only sends a program change message, and not the bank controller. So what if you want to switch between programs in two different banks. The following tutorial provides a solution for this. 1. Create a multiple zone Setup, following tutorial #1. For the purposes of this tutorial, we will assume you will use zone 1 as the zone that will switch programs. 2. Hold the Controllers button and step on the pedal connected to the Switch Pedal 2 j ack. If you are not on zone 1, press the Zone 1 button. The display will now read Zone:1 SwitchPdl 2, SW Type: Momentary. Unlike the previous tutorial, we will leave this set on Momentary. 3. Press the >> button. Press 32, then Enter. The On Controller parameter is now set to controller #32, the bank controller. 4. Press the >> button. Decide which program you want to switch to, making sure that it is in a different bank than the program you previously chose for zone 1. Enter the bank number of the bank your new program is in (the bank numbers were documented at the beginning of this document). The ON Value is now set to the bank number. 5. Press the >> button. Press, 134, then Enter. The Off Controller parameter is now set to GoTo Program. 6. Press the >> button. Enter the number of the program you want to switch to. The Off Value is now set to that program number. 7. Name and Save your Setup. Step on the pedal and release it. Zone 1 should switch to the sound you have chosen. So what is happening? When you step on the pedal it sends the bank change command; when you let go, it sends the program change command, allowing you to switch to any program from any bank. The only limitation of this method is that you can only switch in one direction with a single controller - you cant use one pedal to switch back and forth between two different programs. But you could always assign another controller to do the same thing to switch back, or even to a different program. For instance, you could use the E and F controller buttons, with E set to switch to a new sound and F set to switch back to the original sound.
12. Customizing the Effects Settings
This tutorial will explore customizing the effects parameters beyond the buttons available on the front panel Effects section. This tutorial is designed for the PC88MX, since it shows using both the Internal and VGM effects processors. If you have a regular PC88, you can still follow this tutorial, but simply ignore the steps that refer to zone 3. 1. Create a three zone layered Setup, following tutorial #1. In zone 1, for the Program, select #44 Marimba from the Internal Voices Bank. In zone 2, for the Program, select #60 Metal Marimba from the Internal Voices Bank. In zone 3, for the Program, select #4 Electric Piano 1 from the GM Bank. 2. If zone 1 is not currently showing in the display, press the Zone 1 button. Now, using the buttons in the Effects section, select Room for the Reverb Room Type and Bright for the Reverb Quality. 3. Press the Zone 3 button. Using the buttons in the Effects section, turn off the Reverb and select Chorus 1. 4. Press the Zone 1 button again. Notice that the buttons switch to show Room Bright for the Reverb, with No Chorus. Press the Zone 2 button. The effects settings stay the same. It is important to understand that there are two separate effects processors in the PC88MX. (If you have a regular PC88, you have only one effects processor). These effects processors are completely independent and function only for specific programs. The Internal Effects processor controls all the sounds from the Internal Voices Bank. the VGM Effects processor controls all the sounds from the GM, Expansion Voices, and 64 Note Poly banks. This also means that ALL programs controlled by a specific effects processor will use the same effects. So if you have two zones in your setup using the programs in the Internal Voices bank, making a change to the effects in one zone will actually be changing them for both zones. That is why when you switched from zone 1 to zone 2 in this setup, the effects didnt change, but switching from zone 3 to zone 1 did show a change. 5. Press the Effects button in the Zone Parameters section. The display now shows Zone:2 0:060, IntFx: RoomBright. Notice that the display shows the same values you selected from the dedicated effects buttons. Making any changes there will affect the display, and vice versa. Press the Quality button once to change from Bright to Normal. Notice that the display has changed to show RoomNormal. Move the alpha wheel one click to the right. The display now shows RoomNormal+Ch1. Notice that the Chorus 1 button has now lit up. Move the wheel back one click so it is again set to RoomNormal. 6. Press the Zone 3 button. Notice that the display still says RoomNormal but the effects buttons show no reverb and Chorus 1. The reason that the display and the buttons dont match is that the parameter we are looking at in the display is for the INTERNAL effects, but this zone is playing a program from the GM bank, which would use the VGM effects. Press the Chorus button to select Chorus 2, and notice that the display still does not change.

7. To hear the effect changes better, it will be easier to temporarily mute the VGM effect while you edit the Internal effect. Press the Zone 3 button. Since Zone 3 was already selected, the second button press mutes the zone and the light turns orange. Play the keyboard and you will only hear the Marimba and Metal Marimba patches. 8. Although you can use the buttons in the effects section to quickly call up basic effects settings, you have additional control available within the Zone parameters. Press the Zone 1 button. Press the >> button. The display changes to show Int Rev Wet. dry This is the wet/ mix for the reverb. Try changing the values from low to high, using the alpha wheel, and play the keyboard to hear the difference. After playing with it, set this parameter to 85. 9. Press the >> button. The display now shows Int Rev Time. This sets the overall decay time of the reverb. Again, use the alpha wheel to change the values and play the keyboard to hear the difference. After playing with it, set this parameter to 70. For more on how this parameter works, please see page 7-2 in the manual. 10. Now we will edit the Chorus effect in Zone 3. Press the Zone 3 button twice. The first button press selects the zone and the second one unmutes it. The button is green again. Now we will want to mute the other two zones so we can hear the Electric Piano clearly. But instead of going through all the button presses needed to select those zones and mute them, an easier way is to solo the current zone. Press the Solo button. The Zone 3 button now turns red, showing that it is the only zone you will hear. 11. Press the >> button three times. The display now shows the VGMFx parameter. Notice it is set to Chorus 2, which is what we had selected for this zone, in the Effects section. 12. The VGM effects have an identical set of parameters to those available for the Internal effects. Press the >> button 3 times. You will pass by the VGM Rev Wet and VGM Rev Time. Since we have no reverb on this zone, we wont be using those parameters. The display now shows VGM Eff Wet. This controls the wet/ dry mix of the chorus and reverb. Try changing the values from low to high, using the alpha wheel, and play the keyboard to hear the difference. After playing with it, set this parameter to 75. 13. Press the >> button again. This parameter is VGM Eff Delay, and controls the time of the Delay effect. Since we are using Chorus, changing this parameter wont do anything. Press the Solo button. All of the Zones are now heard if you play the keyboard. 14. Name and Save this Setup.

When you call up a Setup, the initial tempo will normally be set to the value you set in the Tempo parameter. However, if you have a controller (such as a slider) assigned to Tempo AND you set an Entry value for that slider, that Entry value will override the Tempo setting in the Arpeggiator menu. If you do use an Entry value for a controller assigned to Tempo, you will notice that two numbers are displayed. The first number will be a value between 0 and 127, while the second number will be the actual BPM value (between 20 and 300 BPM). A final note - the Tempo parameter only applies as long as the Clock parameter in the Global menu is set to Internal. If you set it to External, it will follow the tempo of any clock messages detected at the MIDI IN port. If no clock is detected, there will be no arpeggiation (no sound will be heard when you press the keys). 11. Press the Arpeggiator button, then press >> seven times to return to Tempo, and once again to go to Duration. This lets you set the duration of each note being played by the arpeggiator. Try setting different values to hear the difference. At 100%, it is completely legato. The lower you set the number, the more staccato the notes are played. 12. Press the >> button. The Velocity Mode parameter determines what velocities are used to create the notes. The current setting should be Played, which is the default. As we noticed before, the notes get softer or louder in the arpeggio depending on how hard you strike the keys. Try setting this parameter to different values to see the difference. If it is set to Fixed, then a specific velocity is used for all notes, determined by the Fixed Vel parameter (the next parameter, accessed with the >> button). If it is set to Last, then all of the arpeggiated notes use the velocity of the last note you strike. Try playing a 3 note chord softly, then striking a fourth note hard - all of the notes will now be loud. If you then restrike j ust that one note softly, all the notes are soft. Setting the value to Pressure means the velocities will be controlled by aftertouch. As you push down on any key, the velocities will be come louder. As with Last, pushing down on any one key will affect all the notes. (This setting will only work if the MPressure controller is assigned to Pressure, which we did in step 4.) The final value is Ctrl 117, which allows you to control the velocities from a MIDI controller. This is covered in tutorial #17. 13. Press >> twice to get to the Note Shift parameter. This parameter and the following two parameters are used in conjunction with each other. Note Shift will take the notes that you play and transpose them up or down. Each time the arpeggio pattern is repeated, the notes will transpose by the amount you set. Set the Note Shift to 2, then play a chord. The notes will arpeggiate, then transpose up a whole step and repeat the pattern, then transpose up a whole step again and repeat the pattern. Press the >> button. The next parameter, Shift Limit will determine how far the PC88 will keep shifting from the original pitches. Set the Shift Limit to 12 and play the keys again. Notice that the pattern will shift up in whole steps till it reaches an octave transposition, then the pattern starts shifting down in whole steps till it reaches the original notes you played, then starts shifting up again. Press the >> button. The Limit Option parameter determines what happens once the arpeggiator reaches the Limit. With the default value of Unipolar, it shifts up and down, as you have seen. Try setting this to different values and listen to the end results. Complete descriptions of all these values are found in the manual on page 6-5. 31

These three parameters allow you to do some pretty wild things with the arpeggiator. The best thing to do is just experiment with different settings. When you find something you like, you can save it as a Setup. 14. Press the >> button. If you turn the last parameter, Glissando, to On, then the arpeggiator will not only play the notes you strike, it will also play all the notes in between the notes you strike. In addition to making regular arpeggios with pitched instruments, you can get interesting effects with by using the arpeggiator with drum and percussion programs. The PC88 itself has somewhat limited abilities in this area since you cant edit the drum programs, but if you use the PC88 to control an external sound module in which you can edit the sounds, you can create many interesting patterns. The key to this is to create programs that have no sample assigned to specific notes. That way, by including those notes in your arpeggiated pattern, you can get the equivalent of rests, to create more varied rhythmic patterns. You can actually demonstrate this on the PC88 itself (if you have the VGM board), using the Latin Percussion program (#63 in the Expansion Voices bank). This program was designed so that playing certain patterns of keys would create specific rhythms. You can use the arpeggiator to repeat that pattern over and over while you hold the notes instead of having to play them. For example if you set the Play Order to Up and you hold all the notes in a C maj or scale from C4 to C5, you will hear the Latin Tumbao pattern. These patterns are documented in the manual on page C-5. You may want to go through the various parameters we have described to create an arpeggiator setting you want to work with. Then Name and Save this Setup - we will be using it as a starting point for the next few tutorials.
16. Using the Various Arpeggiator Latch Modes
The Latch Mode parameter allows you great variation in deciding which notes that you play should be used (latched) by the arpeggiator. In the previous tutorial, Latch Mode was set to Keys, so that the arpeggiator simply latched any note you pressed and held it only as long as the key was held down. But there are many other possibilities. 1. Start with the Setup you created in the last tutorial. Hold the Controllers button and press the G controllers button. Make sure the Switch Type is set to Toggle. Press the >> button. If the button is not already set to 119 Arp Latch1, assign it to that controller. Press the >> button and set the On Value to 64. Press the >> button twice and set the Off Value to 0. Make sure the button is turned Off (the button itself is not lit). 2. Press the Arpeggiator button. Press the >> button 4 times to get to the Latch Mode parameter. Change the value to Overplay. Play some notes on the keyboard. Notice they do not arpeggiate. Now hold some notes and press the G button. The notes start arpeggiating. Let go of the keys. They still continue to arpeggiate. Play some more notes. Notice they are not added to the arpeggio. When you use Overplay mode, only the notes held when the switch is turned on will be arpeggiated. 3. Turn the G button Off. Change the value of the Latch Mode to Arpeg. Hold some notes on the keyboard, and turn the button on. Let go of the keys. So far, it works identically to Overplay mode. Now press another key. Notice that the note is added to the arpeggio. Let go of the key. The new note is removed from the arpeggio, but the other notes continue to play. 4. Turn the G button Off. Change the value of the Latch Mode to Add. Hold some notes on the keyboard, and turn the button on. Let go of the keys. Again, so far it works identically to Overplay mode. Now press another key. As with Arpeg mode, the note is added to the arpeggio. Let go of the key. Notice that it continues to be arpeggiated. You can keep striking keys and they will keep being added. Note that with Arpeg and Add modes, you dont have to be holding any notes when you turn on the G button. You can turn it on and then play notes and they will start arpeggiating. But if you then let go of the notes, they will stop playing in Arpeg mode but keep playing in Add mode (since you played the keys after turning on the Latch). 5. Turn the G button Off. Change the value of Latch Mode to Auto. The previous 3 modes all used controller 119 to latch the notes for the arpeggiator. Auto does not use controller 119. Play a chord. The notes arpeggiate. Press another key. The note gets added to the arpeggio. Let go of the key. Notice that the note is still part of the arpeggio. In fact you can let go of all keys but one, and every key that you pressed will still be part of the arpeggio. That is the difference between Auto and Keys (our original Latch mode). With Keys, once you let go of the key, the note is removed from the arpeggio. But with auto you can keep striking as many keys as you want to keep adding notes, and as long as you hold one note, you will hear all of the arpeggiated. 6. Finally, change the value of Latch Mode to Pedals. Hold the Controllers button and press the pedal connected to the Switch Pedal 1 j ack. Make sure that the Switch Type is set to Momentary. Press the >> button, then 119, then Enter, to set the pedal to Latch 1.

If you have a second switch pedal, make sure it is plugged into the Switch Pedal 2 jack. Hold the Controllers button and step on that pedal. If you dont have a second pedal, hold the Controllers button and press the E Controllers button. Make sure that the Switch Type is set to Momentary. Press the >> button, then 118, then Enter, to set the pedal to Latch 2. 7. Now, both pedals (or pedal and button) are used to Latch the arpeggiator. Play a chord. The notes are arpeggiated. Let go of the keys. The arpeggiation stops. In Pedals mode, if both are off, then the arpeggiator works as if it is in Keys mode - any notes you play are arpeggiated. Hold a chord and step on the Pedal 1 and hold it down. Let go of the keys. The notes continue to arpeggiate. Play a few more notes. They are added to the arpeggio. With Controller 119 On in Pedals mode, the arpeggiator works as if it is Add mode. Let go of Pedal 1. The arpeggiation stops. Hold a chord and step on Pedal 2 (or press the E button) and hold it down. Let go of the keys. Again the notes continue to arpeggiate. Play a few more notes. This time they are NOT added to the arpeggio. With Controller 118 On in Pedals, mode, the arpeggiator works as if it is Overplay mode. Let go of Pedal 2 (or button E). The arpeggiation stops. The reason we call this Pedals mode is that the two controllers work similarly to the way the two pedals work when they are assigned to Sustain and Sostenuto. With Controller 119, any notes held when you step on the pedal, PLUS any notes played while the pedal is still down are arpeggiated (similar to the way a piano sustains with the sustain pedal). With Controller 118, any notes held when you step on the pedal are arpeggiated, but any notes played after pedal is depressed are NOT arpeggiated (similar to the way a piano sustains with the sostenuto pedal, which is the middle pedal on a 3 pedal piano). As you can see, the latching modes give you a great deal of control over which notes get arpeggiated. We encourage you to play around with these modes as well as the other arpeggiation parameters to see what interesting uses you can find for it. One last thing to remember is that if you have a controller assigned to turn the Arpeggiator On and Off (which we did by assigning button F to this function in tutorial #15), the arpeggiator must be turned On in order for any of the latching functions to work.

26. Using SysEx to Store Your Setups
If you start to edit your own Setups, you will want to store them externally, in case anything happens to your battery backed memory, or you need to create more Setups than you have room for in the PC88. Since the PC88 does not have its own disk drive, you must save this info by sending a system exclusive dump to an external device such as a sequencer or sysex recorder. You can either dump the entire memory in one shot, or you can dump individual Setups. To dump the entire memory: 1. Connect a MIDI cable from the Out of the PC88 to the In of your external device. 2. Press the Global button, then press the >> button until you see Dump all Setups? in the display. 3. Start the recording on your external device and press Enter on the PC88. The MIDI Receive light will blink and the display will show you the Setups being dumped. Once it is finished, stop recording. A note for K2000/ K2500 users: The sequencer in the K2000/ K2500 can only allow songs up to 64k. A dump of the entire PC88 memory is larger than 64k. So you cant use this method. Instead you must dump individual Setups. If you need to dump all 128 Setups, you can put half of them in one song and half in another. To dump individual Setups: 1. Connect a MIDI cable from the Out of the PC88 to the In of your external device. 2. Call up the Setup you want to Dump. Press the Store button, then press the >> button twice. The display will now show Dump setup.?. 3. Start the recording on your external device and press Enter on the PC88. The MIDI Receive light will blink and the display will tell when the dump is finished. Once it is finished, stop recording. To load a dump back into the PC88: 1. Connect a MIDI cable from the In of the PC88 to the Out of your external device. 2. Play back the sequence, or initiate the dump playback from your external device. Thats it. You dont have to put the PC88 in any special mode to receive the dump. When a dump is sent back to the PC88, the information goes to the memory location for that Setup. It does NOT update the edit buffer. Therefore you have to call up that Setup after the dump to hear it. For example, lets say you have dumped Setup #65 previously 47
and have since edited that Setup and have #65 currently called up. If you dump the Setup back into the PC88 and then play the keyboard, you wont hear the older version you have to call up the Setup by typing in 65 and Enter on the keypad, or scrolling away and back to it. It is always a good idea to test your dumping procedure to make sure everything worked correctly, before making massive changes. You wouldnt want to delete several months of work only to find out the sysex dump wasnt correctly recorded. A simple way to test to make some easy change and send the dump back to make sure it is received correctly. For example, you can dump the Setup, then change one letter in the Setup name and save that change. then dump the Setup back to see if the name changes back to the original. Dont forget that you have to call up the Setup after dumping it back in.

doc1

Americas Premiere Vocal/Piano Duo ~ Double Grand
BACKSTAGE QUICK CHANGE AREA Safety Backup Hardwire Mike (in stand) Monitor Wedge #1 (elevated on chair) Long-arm Boom Mike KURZWEIL PC88 or comparable weighted professional keyboard synthesizer (keyboard stand, pedal, power supply)
OVERHEAD STAGE PLOT & SOUND REQUIREMENTS
REAR CURTAIN Overhead Screen or Screen on side of stage. Monitor Wedge #2

(elevated on chair)

with Deborah Johnson & Wayland Pickard 2 keyboards

2 Direct Boxes

AC power box or quad box
KURZWEIL PC88 or comparable Long-arm weighted professional keyboard synthesizer (keyboard stand, pedal, Boom Mike power supply) For concert hall stages, we have lids we can fly out with that will sit on a 2nd keyboard stand or small table. This will be surrounded with duvetyne cloth & gives the illusion of grand pianos.
Cordless Mic Monitor Wedge #3
Cordless Mic Mike Stand w/cordless clip Monitor Wedge #4
FRONT CURTAIN 2 Kurzweil PC 88 or comparable weighted pro keyboard Sound board-at least 12 inputs. Reverb in Monitors Stage lighting & follow spot
*2 hour sound check/tech rehearsal with sound, lighting & video requested early afternoon on day of performance.
AUDIENCE BASIC SOUND NEEDS: 4 monitors: 1-2 mixes 7 MICROPHONES 2 Cordless Vocal mikes 2 Hardline Vocal mikes (on standard 3 long boom) at keyboard/piano 1 Hardline safety/backup vocal mike (on stand near piano) 2 DIs for electronic pianos & 2 DIs for CD & DVD player. mikes Projector and Screen. DVD Player (we have projector & DVD player & can provide)

 

Tags

Cleaner Wusb54GS VP-D463I Morphous-2006 EB-S6 D-EJ017CK 170MP FE-300 UF-6100 KDL-60LX900 SC-EH590EB Europa 4 V-I Naite PSR-200 Review WK-3700 Plus 760 BT500 NWZ-X1061 Precision M50 VN-960 PC EPR125crrrmf Dvdr3510V-31 Vivicam 35 Canon L200 27907 WV-CL830 Easypen M610 Series AVR-3600DTS Mouse Canon S100 CA-MXS5RMD KDC-C710 42RV600T PV-L680D CLP-133 31132 RDR-HX525 HQ5813 1200 Rebel XTI NX-10 TEL 35B PRO 4723 Automatique SA-VE525 14 4-2 AN400 BM35 PMR Classic Travelmate 2490 GR-F258JTT X2000 2 WL-312 US2-mant940 4100IX Zoom SLV-D900E MW89MST Brood WAR Autoportee SG15 IC-24AT RH-4800W C3100 RP609Z BF641FST IR-FOX C FAX-30 XEC700 LMF-400 FP71G LN-121 RT-21FB70V Serie 3 VGN-NS21m S CC-ED200 DMC-FX7 Fostex DV40 VSX-D811s-K T2030-9 ALL-IN-ONE Spotmeter 42WB02S HT-DDW660 Image PT-AX100U HD 570 NWZ-E355 Laserjet 9000 FS-680 Nokia 2112 FZ 62 FC6843 02 NV-FS90B DEH-P5950IB Deskjet 916C Mini-S3 RM-TP503 Elna 683 DMR-EX795

 

manuel d'instructions, Guide de l'utilisateur | Manual de instrucciones, Instrucciones de uso | Bedienungsanleitung, Bedienungsanleitung | Manual de Instruções, guia do usuário | инструкция | návod na použitie, Užívateľská príručka, návod k použití | bruksanvisningen | instrukcja, podręcznik użytkownika | kullanım kılavuzu, Kullanım | kézikönyv, használati útmutató | manuale di istruzioni, istruzioni d'uso | handleiding, gebruikershandleiding

 

Sitemap

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101