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Lowrance M68C S-MAP

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About

Lowrance M68C S-MAPLowrance 116-05 M68C S/Map - No Transducer
M68C S/Map Compact Fishinderw/0 TransducerHigh-brightness 3.5" (8.9cm) diagonal 256-color - 1/4 VGA active matrix TFT transflective LCD Impressive 320V x 240H pixel resolution 12-parallel channel GPS+W

Details
Brand: Eagle
Part Numbers: 116-05, 116-052, 11605, 116052, 34267, CWR-34267, M68C w
UPC: 042194523354, 42194523354

 

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User reviews and opinions

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Comments to date: 3. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
quichote 11:33am on Friday, June 25th, 2010 
My kids and I were able to use the fish finder right out of the box. It showed the fish beautifully.
dr-nice666 8:33pm on Saturday, June 5th, 2010 
I use this on Lake Ouachita in Arkansas. There are many rivers that run into this lake and there are many islands so it is easy to get turned around.
matzeburger 10:36pm on Monday, March 29th, 2010 
i like it for the songs that it dos when it finds fish "Functional","I like it","Easy To Use","Easy To Maintain","Durable" BEST UNIT MY FLEET "Easy To Use","Functional","Durable","Easy To Maintain"

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

How this manual can get you out on the water, fast!
Welcome to the exciting world of digital sonar and GPS! We know you're anxious to begin finding fish, but we have a favor to ask. Before you grab the unit and begin installing it, please give us a moment or two to explain how our manual can help you get the best performance from your combination fish finder and GPS receiver. First, we want to thank you for buying a Lowrance sonar/GPS unit. Whether you're a first time user or a professional fisherman, you'll discover that your unit is easy to use, yet capable of handling demanding navigation and sonar tasks. Our goal for this book is to get you on the water fast, with a minimum of fuss. Like you, we'd rather spend more time boating or fishing and less time reading the manual! So, we designed our book so that you don't have to read the whole thing from front to back for the information you want. At the start (or end) of each segment, we'll tell you what content is coming up next. If it's a concept you're already familiar with, we'll show you how and where to skip ahead for the next important topic. We've also made it easy to look up any tips you may need from time to time. Here's how: The manual is organized into 11 sections. This first section is an introduction to the M68 sonar and GPS. It tells you the basics you need to know before you can make the unit look around and tell you where you are, or look below the surface to find some fish. Section 2 will help you install your unit, as well as the transducer (the most important part of any sonar installation). We'll also tell you about some of the available accessories. Section 3 covers Basic Sonar Operation. It will show you how easy it is to run your sonar, right out of the box. This section features a one-page Sonar Quick Reference. (If you've already jumped ahead and figured out how to install the unit yourself, and you just can't wait any longer, turn to the Quick Reference on page 37 and head for the water with your unit!) After you've gained some experience with your sonar, you'll want to check out Section 4, which discusses more advanced Sonar Options and Other Features. When you come to a sonar menu command on the unit's screen, you can look it up in the manual by skimming over the table of contents or the in1
Section 1: Read Me First!
dex, or just flipping through Section 3 or scanning through the sonar options in Section 4. Section 5 is a brief introduction to the powerful ice fishing applications of the M68C and M68C IceMachine. (See section 2 to learn how you can get the most out of your M68C with the addition of a special portable power pack for ice fishing.) If you're having difficulty with your sonar, you can find an answer to the most common problems in Section 6, Sonar Troubleshooting. The manual switches from sonar to navigation in Section 7, which introduces you to Basic GPS Operations. This section features a onepage GPS Quick Reference on page 91. Section 7 contains short, easy-to-scan GPS lessons that follow one another in chronological order. They're all you'll need to know to find your way on the water quickly. After you've learned the basics (or if you already have some GPS experience), you may want to try out some of the unit's many advanced navigation features. That brings us to Section 8, Advanced GPS Operations. This section contains the rest of the unit's GPS command functions, organized in alphabetical order. When you come to a GPS menu command on the screen, you can look it up in the manual by skimming over the table of contents or index, just flipping through Section 7 or scanning through the command portion of Section 8. This unit is ready to use right out of the box, but you can fine tune and customize its operation with dozens of options. Since sonar is the unit's key feature, we put the main sonar options in Section 4. Some options, such as screen brightness settings, affect both sonar and GPS operations. We describe how to use those common options along with GPS options in Section 9, System Setup and GPS Setup Options. Section 9 is organized in alphabetical order. In Section 10, we go into more detail on one of the unit's most remarkable GPS capabilities Searching. There are so many map items you can search for, we had to give this function its own section in the manual! Finally, in Section 11, we offer Supplemental Material, including a list of the GPS datums used, warranties and customer service information. Now, if you're into the fine details, glance over the next segment on specifications to see just how much sonar and GPS power your unit contains. It's important to us (and our power users), but, if you don't care how many watts of power the unit has, or how many waypoints it can store, skip ahead to important information on how sonar works, on page 4. (Background on GPS begins on page 5.) 2

How Your Sonar Works

Sonar has been around since the 1940s, so if you already know how it works, skip down to read about the relatively new technology of GPS. But, if you've never owned a sonar fish finder, this segment will tell you the underwater basics. Sonar is an abbreviation for SOund NAvigation and Ranging, a technology developed during World War II for tracking enemy submarines. (Lowrance developed the world's first transistorized sportfishing sonar in 1957.) A sonar consists of a transmitter, transducer, receiver and display. In simple terms, here's how it finds the bottom, or the fish: The transmitter emits an electrical impulse, which the transducer converts into a sound wave and sends into the water. (The sound frequency can't be heard by humans or fish.) The sound wave strikes an object (fish, structure, bottom) and bounces back to the transducer, which converts the sound back into an electrical signal. The receiver amplifies this return signal, or echo, and sends it to the 4
display, where an image of the object appears on the scrolling sonar chart. The sonar's microprocessor calculates the time lapse between the transmitted signal and echo return to determine the distance to the object. The whole process repeats itself several times each second.

How Your GPS Works

You'll navigate faster and easier if you understand how this unit scans the sky to tell you where you are on the earth and, where you're going. (But if you already have a working understanding of GPS receivers and the GPS navigation system, skip on ahead to Section 2, Installation & Accessories on page 9. If you're new to GPS, read on, and you can later impress your friends with your new-found knowledge.) First, think of your unit as a small but powerful computer. (But don't worry we made this unit easy to use, so you don't need to be a computer expert to find your way!) The unit includes a keypad and a screen with menus so you can tell it what to do. The screen also lets the unit show your location on a moving map, as well as point the way to your destination. This unit uses an internal antenna/receiver module, which makes the whole system work something like your car radio. But instead of your favorite dance tunes, this receiver tunes in to a couple of dozen GPS satellites circling the earth. (It will also listen in to the WAAS satellites in orbit, but more about that in the upcoming segment introducing you to GPS and WAAS.) Your unit listens to signals from as many satellites as it can "see" above the horizon, eliminates the weakest signals, then computes its location in relation to those satellites. Once it figures its latitude and longitude, the unit plots that position on the GPS screen. The whole process takes place several times a second! Another portion of the unit's onboard memory is devoted to recording GPS navigation information, which includes waypoints, event marker icons, trails and routes. This lets you look back the way you came, and retrace your path. Think of this data storage like the hard drive memory in a computer or a tape in a cassette tape recorder. You can save several different GPS data files, erase 'em and record new ones, over and over again.

Like most GPS receivers, this unit doesnt have a compass or any other navigation aid built inside. It relies solely on the signals from the satellites to calculate a position. Speed, direction of travel, and distance are all calculated from position information. Therefore, in order for the unit to determine direction of travel, you must be moving and the faster, the better. This is not to say that it wont work at walking or trolling speeds it will. There will simply be more "wandering" of the data shown on the display. GPS alone is plenty accurate for route navigation, but the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has special aircraft navigation needs that go beyond basic GPS. So, the FAA has developed a program to boost GPS performance with its Wide Area Augmentation System, or WAAS. The FAA commissioned the system on July 11, 2003. WAAS is designed to increase GPS accuracy to within 7.6 meters vertically and horizontally, but it consistently delivers accuracies within 1-2 meters horizontal and 2-3 meters vertical, according to the FAA. It does this by broadcasting correction signals on GPS frequencies. Your unit automatically receives both GPS and WAAS signals. However, there are some fringe areas of the U.S., including parts of Alaska, that do not yet receive robust WAAS coverage. Continued WAAS development is planned to extend WAAS coverage in the years to come. WAAS boosts the accuracy of land GPS navigation, but the system is designed for aircraft. The satellites are in a fixed orbit around the Equator, so they appear very low in the sky to someone on the ground in North America. Aircraft and vessels on open water can get consistently good WAAS reception, but terrain, foliage or even large man-made structures can sometimes block the WAAS signal from ground receivers. You'll find that using your GPS receiver is both easy and amazingly accurate. Its easily the most accurate method of electronic navigation available to the general public today. Remember, however, that this receiver is only a tool. Always have another method of navigation available, such as a map or chart and a compass. Also remember that this unit will always show navigation information in the shortest line from your present position to a waypoint, regardless of terrain! It only calculates position, it cant know whats between you and your destination, for example. Its up to you to safely navigate around obstacles, no matter how youre using this product.
How to use this manual: typographical conventions
Many instructions are listed as numbered steps. The keypad and arrow "keystrokes" appear as boldface type. So, if you're in a real hurry (or just need a reminder), you can skim the instructions and pick out what 7

3. Assembling the transducer. Once you determine the correct position for the ratchets, assemble the transducer as shown in the following figure. Don't tighten the lock nut at this time.

Nut Metal washer

Rubber washers Bolt

Metal washer

Assemble transducer and bracket.
4. Drilling mounting holes. Hold the transducer and bracket assembly against the transom. The transducer should be roughly parallel to the ground. The transducer's centerline should be in line with the bottom of the hull. Don't let the bracket extend below the hull! Mark the center of each slot for the mounting screw pilot holes. You will drill one hole in the center of each slot. Drill the holes using the #29 bit (for the #10 screws).

Transom Transom

Position transducer mount on transom and mark mounting holes. Side view shown at left and seen from above at right.
5. Attaching transducer to transom. Remove the transducer from the bracket and re-assemble it with the cable passing through the bracket over the bolt as shown in the following figures.
Route cable over bolt and through bracket. Side view shown at left and seen from above at right.
Attach the transducer to the transom. Slide the transducer up or down until it's aligned properly with the bottom of the hull as shown in the preceding and following figures. Tighten the bracket's mounting screws, sealing them with the sealant/adhesive compound. Adjust the transducer so that it's parallel to the ground and tighten the nut until it touches the outer washer, then add 1/4 turn. Don't over tighten the lock nut! If you do, the transducer won't "kick-up" if it strikes an object in the water.

Bottom of hull

Flat-bottom hull Deep-"vee" hull Align transducer centerline with hull bottom and attach to transom.
6. Route the transducer cable through or over the transom to the sonar unit. Make sure to leave some slack in the cable at the transducer. If possible, route the transducer cable away from other wiring on the boat. Electrical noise from the engine's wiring, bilge pumps, VHF radio wires and cables, and aerators can be picked up by the sonar. Use caution when routing the transducer cable around these wires. WARNING: Clamp the transducer cable to the transom close to the transducer. This can prevent the transducer from entering the boat if it is knocked off at high speed. If you need to drill a hole in the transom to pass the connector through, the required hole size is 5/8". Caution: If you drill a hole in the transom for the cable, make sure it is located above the waterline. After installation, be sure to seal the hole with the same marine grade above- or below-waterline sealant/adhesive used for the mounting screws. 7. Make a test run to determine the results. If the bottom is lost at high speed, or if noise appears on the display, try sliding the transducer bracket down. This puts the transducer deeper into the water, hopefully below the turbulence causing the noise. Don't allow the transducer bracket to go below the bottom of the hull! TROLLING MOTOR BRACKET INSTALLATION 1. Attach the optional TMB-S bracket to the transducer as shown in the following figure, using the hardware supplied with the transducer. (Note: The internal tooth washer is supplied with the TMB-S.)

Overlay Data command: chooses what types of information (such as water temperature) to show overlaid on the sonar chart screen. Sonar Features command: launches the Sonar Features menu which controls many functions and options, including screen color mode, auto depth and sensitivity, surface clarity, noise rejection, Fish I.D. symbols, the zoom bar and zone bar. Ping Speed command: sets the rate at which sonar pings are made.
The M68 has four major Sonar display options. They are the Full Sonar Chart, Split Zoom Sonar Chart, Digital Data and Flasher. You access the various display modes by pressing the PAGES key, then pressing to SONAR| or to desired page|ENT. The Full Sonar Chart is the main Sonar display option. This is a "crosssection" view of the water column beneath the boat. The chart moves across the screen, displaying sonar signal echoes that represent fish, structure and the bottom.
Digital data overlay (depth & temperature) Surface signal Surface clutter

Depth scale

In FasTrack, fish arches show as horizontal bars. Fish arches around school of bait fish Zoom bar

Structure

Bottom signal Sonar Page, showing full sonar chart mode.

FasTrack bar graph

Sonar chart display options (from left) full sonar chart and split zoom.
Sonar chart display options (from left) digital data and flasher.
You can customize how the Sonar Page pictures and other data are displayed in many ways. We'll discuss all of those features and options in the Advanced Sonar Operation section, but to show you how easy the sonar unit is to operate, the following page contains a simplified, 10step quick reference that will cover most fish finding situations. The quick reference describes how your unit will operate with all the sonar features in their automatic modes, which are set at the factory.
Basic Sonar Quick Reference
1. Mount the transducer and unit. Connect the unit to electric power and the transducer. 2. Launch your boat. 3. To turn on the unit, press and release PWR key. 4. Head for your fishing grounds. Your unit automatically displays digital depth and surface water temperature in the corner of the screen. The auto settings will track the bottom, displaying it in the lower portion of the screen. The full sonar chart will scroll from right to left, showing you what's under the boat as you cruise across the water. 5. As you're watching the sonar returns, you can change the display by: Zoom in to enlarge the chart for more detail: press ZIN. Zoom out to return to full chart mode: press ZOUT. 6. If necessary, adjust sensitivity to improve chart readability. Press

Changing the upper and lower limits gives you far greater control over the depth range. This feature lets you "zoom in" the display in almost unlimited combinations. Nearly any segment of the water column, from the surface to the bottom can be shown. This enlarges the sonar targets to best suit your fishing needs and water conditions.
At left, Sonar Page Menu with Upper and Lower Limits command selected. At right, Sonar Chart Limits menu, with Upper Limit selected.
To change the upper and lower limits: 1. From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to UPPER AND LOWER LIMITS|ENT. The Sonar Chart Limits menu appears, with Upper Limit selected. 2. To set the upper limit, press ENT. Press or until the first digit is correct, then to move to the second digit. Repeat until the depth is correct, then press EXIT. 3. To set the lower limit, press to LOWER LIMIT|ENT. Press or until the first digit is correct, then to move to the second digit. Repeat until the depth is correct, then press EXIT|EXIT|EXIT.

Area "zoomed"

Normal display, in auto depth range mode, left. At right, display "zoomed" with Upper and Lower Limits focusing on the portion of the water column from 10 feet to 20 feet deep.
To turn off upper and lower limits: 1. From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to AUTO DEPTH RANGE|ENT|EXIT.

FasTrack

This feature automatically converts all echoes to short horizontal lines on the display's far right side. The graph on the rest of the screen continues to operate normally. FasTrack gives you a rapid update of conditions directly under the boat. This makes it useful for ice fishing, or when you're fishing at anchor. When the boat is not moving, fish signals are long, drawn out lines on a normal chart display. FasTrack converts the graph to a vertical bar graph that, with practice, makes a useful addition to fishing at a stationary location.

Surface clutter

Fish arches Structure In FasTrack, fish arches show as horizontal bars. Bottom signal GrayLine Sonar Page showing FasTrack. FasTrack bar graph
Fish I.D. (Fish Symbols & Depths)
The Fish I.D. feature identifies targets that meet certain conditions as fish. The microcomputer analyzes all echoes and eliminates surface clutter, thermoclines, and other signals that are undesirable. In most instances, remaining targets are fish. The Fish I.D. feature displays fish symbols on the screen in place of the actual fish echoes. There are several fish symbol sizes. These are used to designate the relative size between targets. In other words, Fish I.D. displays a small fish symbol when it thinks a target is a small fish, a medium fish symbol on a larger target and so on. The sonar's microcomputer is sophisticated, but it can be fooled. It can't distinguish between fish and other suspended objects such as trotlines, turtles, submerged floats, air bubbles, etc. Individual tree limbs extending outwards from a group of limbs is the hardest object for the Fish I.D. feature to distinguish from fish. 52

Sonar Color Mode

The default color scheme for the sonar chart is white background, but we offer other variations to suit your viewing preferences. You can select the chart to be displayed in grayscale, blue background, reverse grayscale, bottom black or IceView mode. (For more information on IceView, see the entry on that topic Sec. 5.) To change the chart mode color scheme: 1. From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to SONAR FEATURES|ENT. 60
2. Press to SONAR CHART MODE|ENT. 3. Press or to Mode Name|ENT. 4. Press EXIT|EXIT to return to the Sonar Page.
Sonar Page & Sonar Chart Display Options
The M68 offers four Sonar chart display options. To choose among them, press EXIT to clear any menus, then press PAGES and use the arrow keys to select the desired mode. Full Sonar Chart This is the default mode used when the Sonar is turned on for the first time or when it's reset to the factory defaults. The bottom signal scrolls across the screen from right to left. Depth scales on the right side of the screen aid in determining the depth of targets. The line at the top of the screen represents the surface. The bottom depth and surface temperature (if the unit is equipped with a temperature sensor or a transducer with a temp sensor built in) show at the top left corner of the screen. The FasTrack display shows just to the right of the scale. This changes all echoes into short horizontal bars, replicating a flasher sonar. The zoom bar on the far right shows the area that's zoomed when the zoom is in use. (See the Zoom section for more information.)
Full Sonar Chart. The Overlay Data (depth and water temperature) are each set to a different text size.
Split Zoom Sonar Chart A split chart shows the underwater world from the surface to the bottom on the right side of the screen. The left side shows an enlarged version of the right side. The zoom range shows at the bottom left corner of the screen. 61
Split Zoom Sonar Chart. Image at left shows the left window zoomed to 2X. The right image shows the left window zoomed to 4X. The depth overlay data is set to the default large text size; the water temperature is set to the medium text size.
Digital Data/Chart This mode shows seven digital data boxes or windows containing (by default): Water Depth; Water Temp; Temp 2; Track; Distance to Destination; Speed; and the unit's Voltage.

Digital Data/Chart

Flasher The Flasher page represents a flasher style sonar. A circular dial shows all returning echoes at a high screen refresh rate. It uses the ColorLine feature to show weaker targets as lighter colors. The bottom depth is also shown as a black bar across the outer circle.

Satellite Page. Left view indicates unit has not locked on to any satellites and does not have a fix on its position. Center view shows satellites being scanned. Right view shows satellite lock-on with a 3D position acquired (latitude, longitude and altitude.)
This screen shows a graphical view of the satellites that are in view. Each satellite is shown on the circular chart relative to your position. The point in the center of the chart is directly overhead. The small inner ring represents 45 above the horizon and the large ring represents the horizon. North is at the top of the screen. You can use this to see which satellites are obstructed by obstacles in your immediate area if the unit is facing north. The GPS receiver is tracking satellites those satellites whose numbers appear in light blue on the circular chart. The receiver hasn't locked onto a satellite if the number is dark blue, therefore it isn't being used to solve the position. Beneath the circular graph are the bar graphs, one for each satellite in view. Since the unit has twelve channels, it can dedicate one channel per visible satellite. The taller the bar on the graph, the better the unit is receiving the signals from the satellite. The "Estimated Position Error" (horizontal position error) shown in the upper right corner of the screen is the expected error from a benchmark location. In other words, if the EPE shows 50 feet, then the position shown by the unit is estimated to be within 50 feet of the actual location. This also gives you an indicator of the fix quality the unit currently has. The smaller the position error number, the better (and more accurate) the fix is. If the position error flashes dashes, then the unit hasn't locked onto the satellites, and the number shown isn't valid. The Satellite Status Page has its own menu, which is used for setting various options. (Options and setup are discussed in Sec. 9.) To access the Satellite Status Page Menu, from the Status Page, press MENU. 85
Navigation Page This screen has a compass rose that not only shows your direction of travel, but also the direction to a selected waypoint. To get to the Navigation Page: Press PAGES| to MAP| or to NAVIGATION|EXIT. The navigation screen looks like the one below when you're not navigating to a waypoint or following a route or trail. Your position is shown by an arrow in the center of the screen. Your trail history, or path you've just taken, is depicted by the line extending from the arrow. The arrow pointing down at the top of the compass rose indicates the current track (direction of travel) you are taking.

At left, the distance from the boat's current position to the cove is 5.78 miles. At right. the distance from Houston to New Orleans is 316.9 miles.
Find Distance From Point to Point
You can also measure distance between two other points on the map. 1. While on the Map Page press: MENU| to FIND DISTANCE|ENT. 2. Center your cursor over the first position. (A rubber band line appears, connecting your current position to the cursor's location.) Press ENT to set the first point, and the rubber band line disappears. 3. Move the cursor to the second position. The rubber band line reappears, connecting the first point you set to the cursor. The distance along that line will appear in the box at the bottom of the screen. 4. Press EXIT to clear the command and return to the page screen.
Icons are graphic symbols used to mark some location, personal point of interest or event. They can be placed on the map screen, saved and re107
called later for navigation purposes. These are sometimes referred to as event marker icons. The M68 has 42 different symbols you can pick from when creating an icon. Icons are similar to waypoints, but they do not store as much information (like names) as waypoints do. You can't use a menu to navigate to icons as you can with waypoints. (But, you can use the map cursor and navigate to any icon on the map.) You can create an icon at the cursor position on the map, or at your current position while you are navigating. Create Icon on Map 1. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the place where you want to make an icon. 2. Press ENT and the screen shows a "Select Icon Symbol" menu. 3. Press or or or to select your icon symbol, then press ENT. The icon appears on the map.
Cursor selects icon location, left; Select Icon Symbol menu, center; Boat Ramp icon on map, right. (Cursor has been moved for clarity.)
Create Icon at Current Position 1. While you are traveling, press ENT and the screen shows a "Select Icon Symbol" menu. 2. Press or or or to select your icon symbol, then press ENT. The icon appears on the map. Delete an Icon You can delete all the icons at one time, you can delete all icons represented by a particular symbol, or you can use the cursor to delete a selected icon from the map. 1. Press MENU| to DELETE MY ICONS|ENT. 108

Waypoints

Delete a Waypoint To delete a waypoint from the waypoint list: press WPT|ENT|ENT|ENT| to waypoint name|ENT| to DELETE WAYPOINT|ENT| to YES|ENT. To return to the previous page, press EXIT|EXIT. To delete a waypoint from the map: 1. Use the arrow keys to select the waypoint with the cursor. 2. Press WPT| to DELETE WAYPOINT|ENT| to YES|ENT. To return to the previous page and clear the cursor, press EXIT. To delete all waypoints at one time: press MENU|MENU| to SYSTEM SETUP|ENT| to DELETE ALL MY WAYPOINTS|ENT| to YES|ENT. To return to the previous page, press EXIT|EXIT. Edit a Waypoint

Waypoint Name

To edit waypoint name: 1. Press WPT|ENT|ENT|ENT| to waypoint name|ENT| to EDIT WAYPOINT|ENT|ENT. 2. Press or to change the first character, then press to the next character and repeat until the name is correct. Press ENT then EXIT|EXIT|EXIT|EXIT to return to the previous page display.

Waypoint Symbol

To edit waypoint symbol: 1. Press WPT|ENT|ENT|ENT| to waypoint name|ENT| to EDIT WAYPOINT|ENT| then to CHOOSE SYMBOL|ENT. 2. Use arrow keys to select desired symbol and press ENT. To return to the previous page, press EXIT|EXIT|EXIT|EXIT.

Waypoint Position

To edit waypoint position: 1. Press WPT|ENT|ENT|ENT| to waypoint name|ENT| to EDIT WAYPOINT|ENT. 2. Latitude: press to LATITUDE|ENT. Press or to change the first character, then press to the next character and repeat until the latitude is correct. Press EXIT. 3. Longitude: press to LONGITUDE|ENT. Press or to change the first character, then press to the next character and repeat until the longitude is correct. Press EXIT. 4. When latitude and longitude are correct, return to the previous page: press EXIT|EXIT|EXIT|EXIT. 117
Selecting a Waypoint To select a waypoint on the map (for navigating to, for editing, etc.,) use the arrow keys and center the cursor over the waypoint. A highlighted halo will appear around the waypoint. Set a Waypoint by Average Position This feature sets a waypoint at the current position after taking several position readings and averaging them. This boosts waypoint position accuracy by helping to eliminate errors caused by atmospheric conditions and other factors. 1. Press WPT| to NEW|ENT. 2. Press or to AVERAGE POSITION|ENT| to CREATE|ENT. 3. Wait while the unit takes points to average for the position. (The greater the number of points, the greater the accuracy.) When the desired number of points accumulates, press ENT to create and save the waypoint. 4. The Edit Waypoint menu appears. You can simply save the waypoint by pressing EXIT|EXIT or you can edit the waypoint. Set a Waypoint by Projecting a Position This feature sets a waypoint at a point located a specific distance and bearing from a reference position. The reference position can be selected from your waypoint list or the map feature list. 1. Press WPT| to NEW|ENT. 2. Press to PROJECTED POSITION|ENT| to CREATE|ENT. 3. Press to CHOOSE REFERENCE|ENT. Use and to select a waypoint or map feature. When the point has been selected, press ENT and the point's position appears as the reference position. 4. Press to DISTANCE|ENT. Press or to change the first character, then press to the next character and repeat until the distance is correct. Press ENT. 5. Press to BEARING|ENT. Press or to change the first character, then press to the next character and repeat until the bearing is correct. Press ENT. 6. Press to PROJECT|ENT. The Edit Waypoint menu appears. You can simply save the new projected waypoint by pressing EXIT|EXIT or you can edit the waypoint. (Press EXIT|ENT if you want to immediately begin navigating to the new waypoint.)

GPS Auto Search on the Satellite Status Menu.
You can force the unit to immediately kick into auto search mode. Here's how: 1. Press PAGES| to MAP| to SATELLITES. 2. Press MENU| to GPS AUTO SEARCH|ENT| to YES|ENT.
Coordinate System Selection
The Coordinate System Menu lets you select the coordinate system to use when displaying and entering position coordinates.
Menus for changing coordinate system used to display positions.
To get to Coordinate System Selection: 1. Press MENU|MENU| to GPS SETUP|ENT. 2. Press to COORDINATE SYSTEM|ENT. This unit can show a position in degrees (36.14952); degrees, minutes and thousandths of a minute (36 28.700'); or degrees, minutes, seconds and tenths of a second (36 28' 40.9"). It can also show position in: UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) projection; MGRS (Standard); MGRS (Standard + 10); Map Fix; Loran TD; British, Irish, Finnish, German, New Zealand, Swedish, Swiss, Taiwan, Greek and Military grids. UTM's are marked on USGS topographic charts. This system divides the Earth into 60 zones, each 6 degrees wide in longitude. British, Irish, Finnish, German, New Zealand, Swedish, Swiss, Taiwan, and Greek grid systems are each the national coordinate system used only in their respective countries. In order to use these grid systems, you must be in the respective country. This unit will pick the matching datum for you when you select the grid. See the entry on Map Datum Selection for more information. The military grid reference system (MGRS) uses two grid lettering schemes, which are referred to as standard and standard + 10 MGRS 121
on this unit. Your position and datum in use determines which one to use. If you use standard, and your position is off significantly, then try the alternate. NOTE: When the position format is changed, it affects the way all positions are shown on all screens. This includes waypoints. To change the coordinate system, press ENT while COORDINATE SYSTEM is highlighted. Press the or arrow keys to highlight the desired format. Press ENT to select it. Press EXIT to erase the menus. To setup Loran TD: NOTE: If the Loran TD conversion is chosen, you must enter the local Loran chain identification for the master and slaves. Do this by selecting "Setup Loran TD" at the bottom of the "Coordinate System" menu and select the ID. Press EXIT to erase this menu.

Configure Loran TD menu.

Map Fix
Map Fix is used with charts or maps. This system asks for a reference position in latitude/longitude, which you take from a marked location on the map. It then shows the present position as distance on the map from that reference point. For example, if it shows a distance of UP 4.00" and LEFT 0.50", you then measure up four inches and to the left a half-inch from the reference point on the map to find your location. To configure a map fix: To use this format, you need to follow these steps in order. First, take your map of the area and determine a reference latitude/longitude. (Please note that in order for this system to work, the lati122

tude/longitude lines must be parallel with the edge of the map. USGS maps are parallel, others may not be. Also, this works better with smaller scale maps.) The reference position can be anywhere on the map, but the closer it is to your location, the smaller the numbers will be that you'll have to deal with. Once you've decided on a reference position, you must save it as a waypoint. (See the waypoint section for information on saving a waypoint.) After you've saved the reference position as a waypoint, exit from the waypoint screens. 1. Press MENU|MENU| to GPS SETUP|ENT. 2. Press to COORDINATE SYSTEM|ENT. 3. Press to SETUP MAP FIX|ENT. The following screen appears, and MAP SCALE is highlighted. Press ENT and enter the map's scale one numeral after another. The scale is generally at the bottom of the paper map. It's shown as a ratio, for example 1:24000. When the scale is entered, press EXIT and the unit returns to the Configure Map Fix screen.
Configure a map fix so the M68 can find your position on a printed chart or topographical map. Press to SELECT ORIGIN|ENT|ENT|ENT to bring up the waypoint list.
Select the waypoint that you saved the reference point under and press
ENT. The unit displays a waypoint information screen with the command SET AS ORIGIN selected; press ENT and the unit returns to the Configure Map Fix menu. Finally, press EXIT to erase this menu. Now press to COORD SYSTEM|ENT, select MAP FIX from the list and press ENT|EXIT.
All position information now shows as a distance from the reference point you chose. 123

Customize Page Displays

The Full Map, Navigation and Position pages can all be customized to display many different types of navigation information in data boxes.
Pages can be customized by turning data boxes on or off.
These data boxes (sometimes referred to as text boxes, data windows or information displays) are controlled with the Customize command. The boxes usually appear at the edge of the display screen. Information type is abbreviated on the Map and Navigation pages, but spelled out on the Position page. The Position Page boxes cannot be turned off; you can only change what information type is displayed in each window. In the previous Map Page figure, the Distance (1.48 mi DST) shown in the top left corner does not appear in a box. Unboxed text that "floats" on top of the screen is controlled by the Overlay Data command, discussed later in this section. Customize Map or Navigation Page While on the Map or Navigation pages, press MENU| to CUSTOMIZE|ENT. Press or to select a data box you would like to see on the page. With the data option highlighted, press ENT. The selected data option is checked and moves to the top of the list. After all options are set, press EXIT to return to the page display. Boxes at the bottom of the screen now provide the customized data. NOTE: The Map Page can display as many as six data boxes, plus the steering arrow box. The Navigation Page can display six data boxes. To turn off a data box, use the same instructions described above to uncheck a data option. Customize Position Page This page has four boxes you can customize. While on the GPS Position Page, press MENU| to CUSTOMIZE|ENT. The data box in the top left cor124

Find Waypoint menu, left and Map Page menu, right.
NOTE: You can search for items even if the unit hasn't acquired a position yet, or start from a position other than your own. When you do a search, distance and bearing to the selected item will be calculated from the unit's current position. If the unit hasn't acquired a position, it will use the last known position. If the cursor is active, the unit will always begin the search at the cursor. You can look up items by name, or search for the item nearest to you.
Find Any Item Selected by Map Cursor
On the Map Page: with a map feature selected by the cursor press WPT. To return to the previous page, press EXIT.
A Map Place selected by the cursor, left, Waypoint Information screen, right.
NOTE: Since the Go To command is highlighted, you can navigate to the selected map place by pressing ENT|EXIT while in the Waypoint Information screen.

Find Map Places

1. Press WPT, press or to select a map place category, then press ENT. You will be given two options: Search By Name or By Nearest.
Find Waypoint menu with Water category selected, left, and with the Lake/River subcategory selected, right.
2. Search by nearest. Press ENT. The "Find By Nearest" menu will show a "calculating" screen, then a list of the nearest map places will appear. Press or to the selected map place and press ENT to call up the Waypoint Information screen. 144
Find by Nearest option, left, Calculating screen, center, map places list, right.
3. Search by name. Press |ENT. There are two options: A. You can spell out the map place in the top selection box. Press or to change the first letter, then press to move the cursor to the next letter and repeat until the name is correct, then press ENT|ENT. B. Jump down to the lower selection list by pressing ENT, then press or to select a map place from the list, then press ENT to call up the map place's Waypoint Information screen.
Find by Name option, left, Find by Name menu, right.
4. When the map place's Waypoint Information screen is displayed, you can choose to "Go To" the map place by pressing ENT or find it on the map by pressing |ENT.
Go To Waypoint option, left; Find on Map option, right.
Find Streets or Intersections
Find a Street 1. From the Map Page, press MENU| to FIND STREETS|ENT and the Find Streets Menu appears.
Find Streets command, left, Find Streets menu, right.
2. You must fill in a street name in the First Street dialog box. Press ENT to display the Find By Name menu. There are two options: A. You can spell out the street in the top selection box. Press or to change the first letter, then press to move the cursor to the next letter and repeat until the name is correct, then press ENT|ENT. B. Or you can jump down to the lower box and pick a street from the selection list. Press ENT, then press or to select a street from the list and press ENT.

doc1

Pub. 988-0152-021 www.lowrance.com

M56 S/Map

Fish-finding Sonar & Mapping GPS
Installation and Operation Instructions
Copyright 2003 Lowrance Electronics, Inc. All rights reserved. Lowrance is a registered trademark of Lowrance Electronics, Inc. Marine-Tex is a trademark of Illinois Tool Works Inc.
Lowrance Electronics may find it necessary to change or end our policies, regulations, and special offers at any time. We reserve the right to do so without notice. All features and specifications subject to change without notice. All screens in this manual are simulated.
For free owner's manuals and other information, visit our web site:

www.lowrance.com

Lowrance Electronics Inc. 12000 E. Skelly Dr. Tulsa, OK USA 74128-2486 Printed in USA.

Table of Contents

Sec. 1: Read Me First!... 1 Capabilities and Specifications: M56.. 3 How your Sonar Works... 4 How your GPS Works... 5 Introduction to GPS and WAAS... 5 How to Use this Manual: Typographical Conventions. 7 Sec. 2: Installation & Accessories.. 9 Preparations... 9 Transducer Installation... 9 Recommended Tools and Supplies.. 10 Selecting a Transducer Location.. 10 How Low Should You Go?.. 11 Shoot-Thru-Hull vs. Transom Mounting.. 12 Transom Transducer Assembly and Mounting. 13 Trolling Motor Bracket Installation.. 16 Transducer Orientation and Fish Arches.. 17 Shoot-Thru-Hull Preparation and Installation. 18 Power and Cable Connections... 22 Mounting the Sonar Unit: In-Dash or Bracket. 23 Portable Sonar Installation.. 27 Portable Transducer Assembly.. 29 Sec. 3: Basic Sonar Operation... 31 Keyboard Basics... 31 Memory.... 32 Menus... 32 Main Menu... 32 Sonar Menu... 33 Pages... 35 Basic Sonar Quick Reference... 37 Sonar Operations... 38 Fish Symbols vs. Full Sonar Chart... 40 Other Free Training Aids... 41 Sec. 4: Sonar Options & Other Features.. 43 ASP (Advanced Signal Processing).. 43 Alarms.... 44 Depth Alarms... 44 Zone Alarm... 45 Fish Alarm... 46 Chart Speed... 47 Depth Cursor... 47 Depth Range - Automatic... 48 Depth Range - Manual... 49 Depth Range - Upper and Lower Limits... 49 FasTrack... 51
Fish I.D. (Fish Symbols & Depths).. 51 FishReveal... 52 FishTrack.... 54 Grayline... 54 Overlay Data... 55 Ping Speed & HyperScroll... 57 Reset Options... 58 Sensitivity & Auto Sensitivity.. 59 Set Keel Offset.... 61 Sonar Color Mode.... 62 Sonar Page & Sonar Chart Display Options.. 62 Full Sonar Chart... 62 Split Zoom Sonar Chart... 63 Digital Data/Chart.. 63 Flasher... 64 Sonar Simulator... 64 Stop Chart.... 65 Surface Clarity.... 65 Zoom Pan... 67 Sec. 5: Sonar Troubleshooting.. 69 Sec. 6: Basic GPS Operations... 73 Keyboard... 73 Power/Lights (Turn Unit On and Off).. 74 Main Menu... 74 Pages... 76 Sonar Page... 76 Satellite Status Page... 76 Navigation Page... 78 Full Map Page... 80 GPS Quick Reference.. 82 Find your Current Position.. 83 Moving around the Map: Zoom & Cursor Arrow Keys. 83 Selecting any Map Item with the Cursor.. 84 Set a Waypoint.... 84 Navigate to a Waypoint... 86 Set Man Overboard (MOB) Waypoint.. 87 Navigate Back to MOB Waypoint.. 87 Navigate to Cursor Position on Map.. 88 Navigate to a Map Place.. 90 Creating and Saving a Trail... 90 Displaying a Saved Trail... 92 Navigating Trails... 92 Cancel Navigation... 96 Sec. 7: Advanced GPS Operations.. 97 Find Distance from Current Position to Another Location. 97
Find Distance from Point to Point... 97 Icons.... 98 Create Icon on Map... 98 Create Icon at Current Position... 98 Delete an Icon... 99 Navigate to an Icon... 99 Routes.... 100 Create and Save a Route.. 100 Delete a Route.... 102 Edit a Route... 103 Navigate a Route.. 103 Navigate a Route in Reverse.. 105 Trails.... 105 Delete a Trail... 105 Edit a Trail Name... 105 Utilities.... 106 Alarm Clock... 106 Sun/Moon Rise & Set Calculator.. 106 Trip Calculator... 106 Trip Down Timer.. 106 Trip Up Timer.... 106 Waypoints... 107 Delete a Waypoint... 107 Edit a Waypoint (Name, Symbol and Position). 107 Set a Waypoint by Average Position.. 108 Set a Waypoint by Projecting a Position.. 108 Sec. 8: System & GPS Setup Options..109 Alarms... 109 Auto Satellite Search... 110 Coordinate System Selection.. 111 Map Fix... 112 Customize Page Displays... 113 GPS Simulator... 115 Simulating Trail or Route Navigation.. 116 Initialize GPS.... 116 Map Auto Zoom... 117 Map Data.... 117 Earth Map Detail.. 117 Pop-Up Map Info... 118 Fill Land with Gray... 118 Map Overlays (Range Rings; Lat/Long Grid).. 118 Map Datum Selection... 118 Map Detail Category Selection.. 119 Map Orientation.... 120 Overlay Data... 121

Pop-Up Help... 123 Reset Options.... 124 Screen Contrast and Brightness.. 124 Set Language.... 125 Set Local Time... 126 Show WAAS Alarm... 126 Software Version Information... 127 Sounds and Alarm Sound Styles.. 127 Track Smoothing.... 128 Trail Options... 128 Delete All Trails... 129 Update Active Trail Option... 129 Update Trail Criteria (Auto, Time, Distance).. 129 Trail Update Rate (Time, Distance).. 130 Delete Trail... 130 New Trail... 131 Trail Visible/Invisible and Other Trail Options. 131 Units of Measure... 131 Sec. 9: Searching...133 Find any Item Selected by Map Cursor... 133 Find Map Places.... 134 Find Streets or Intersections.. 136 Find Waypoints... 140 Sec. 10: Supplemental Material..143 Index....149
WARNING! A CAREFUL NAVIGATOR NEVER RELIES ON ONLY ONE METHOD TO OBTAIN POSITION INFORMATION. CAUTION When showing navigation data to a position (waypoint), a GPS unit will show the shortest, most direct path to the waypoint. It provides navigation data to the waypoint regardless of obstructions. Therefore, the prudent navigator will not only take advantage of all available navigation tools when traveling to a waypoint, but will also visually check to make sure a clear, safe path to the waypoint is always available. WARNING! When a GPS unit is used in a vehicle, the vehicle operator is solely responsible for operating the vehicle in a safe manner. Vehicle operators must maintain full surveillance of all pertinent driving, boating or flying conditions at all times. An accident or collision resulting in damage to property, personal injury or death could occur if the operator of a GPS-equipped vehicle fails to pay full attention to travel conditions and vehicle operation while the vehicle is in motion.
How this manual can get you out on the water, fast!
Welcome to the exciting world of digital sonar and GPS! We know you're anxious to begin finding fish, but we have a favor to ask. Before you grab the unit and begin installing it, please give us a moment or two to explain how our manual can help you get the best performance from your combination fish finder and GPS receiver. First, we want to thank you for buying a Lowrance sonar/GPS unit. Whether you're a first time user or a professional fisherman, you'll discover that your unit is easy to use, yet capable of handling demanding navigation and sonar tasks. Our goal for this book is to get you on the water fast, with a minimum of fuss. Like you, we'd rather spend more time boating or fishing and less time reading the manual! So, we designed our book so that you don't have to read the whole thing from front to back for the information you want. At the start (or end) of each segment, we'll tell you what content is coming up next. If it's a concept you're already familiar with, we'll show you how and where to skip ahead for the next important topic. We've also made it easy to look up any tips you may need from time to time. Here's how: The manual is organized into 10 sections. This first section is an introduction to the M56 sonar and GPS. It tells you the basics you need to know before you can make the unit look around and tell you where you are, or look below the surface to find some fish. Section 2 will help you install your unit, as well as the transducer (the most important part of any sonar installation). We'll also tell you about some of the available accessories. Section 3 covers Basic Sonar Operation. It will show you how easy it is to run your sonar, right out of the box. This section features a one-page Sonar Quick Reference. (If you've already jumped ahead and figured out how to install the unit yourself, and you just can't wait any longer, turn to the Quick Reference on page 37 and head for the water with your unit!) After you've gained some experience with your sonar, you'll want to check out Section 4, which discusses more advanced Sonar Options and Other Features. 1

Section 2: Installation & Accessories

Preparations

You can install the sonar and GPS systems in some other order if you prefer, but we recommend this installation sequence: CAUTION: You should read over this entire installation section before drilling any holes in your vehicle or vessel! 1. Determine the approximate location for the sonar/GPS unit, so you can plan how and where to route the power/transducer cable. This will help you make sure you have enough cable length for the desired configuration. 2. Determine the approximate location for the transducer and its cable route. 3. Determine the location of your battery or other power connection, along with the power cable route. 4. Install the transducer and route the transducer cable to the sonar/GPS unit. 5. Route the power cable from the unit's location to an appropriate power source and connect it there. 6. Connect the transducer/power cable to the unit and mount the sonar/GPS unit to the bracket.

Transducer Installation

These instructions will help you install your Skimmer transducer on a transom, on a trolling motor or inside a hull. Please read all instructions before proceeding with any installation. Your Skimmer transducer typically comes packaged with a one-piece stainless steel bracket for mounting it to the transom of your boat. The optional trolling motor mount uses a one-piece plastic bracket with an adjustable strap. These are "kick-up" mounting brackets. They help prevent damage if the transducer strikes an object while the boat is moving. If the transducer does "kick-up," the bracket can easily be pushed back into place without tools. Read these instructions carefully before attempting the installation. Determine which of the installation methods is right for your boat. 9
Remember, the transducer location and installation is the most critical part of a sonar installation. Recommended Tools and supplies If you prefer the option of routing the cable through the transom, you will need a 5/8" drill bit. NOTE: The following installation types also call for these recommended tools and required supplies that you must provide (supplies listed here are not included):

Transom installation

Tools include: two adjustable wrenches, drill, #29 (0.136") drill bit, flathead screwdriver. Supplies: high quality, marine grade above- or belowwaterline sealant/adhesive compound.
Trolling motor installations
Tools: two adjustable wrenches, flat-head screwdriver. Supplies: plastic cable ties.
Shoot-through hull installations
Tools: these will vary depending on your hull's composition. Consult your boat dealer or manufacturer. Other tools are a wooden craft stick or similar tool for stirring and applying epoxy, and a paper plate or piece of cardboard to mix the epoxy on. Supplies: rubbing alcohol, 100 grit sandpaper, specially formulated epoxy adhesive available from LEI (see ordering information on the inside back cover). A sandwich hull also requires polyester resin. Selecting a Transducer Location 1. The location must be in the water at all times, at all operating speeds. 2. The transducer must be placed in a location that has a smooth flow of water at all times. If the transducer is not placed in a smooth flow of water, interference caused by bubbles and turbulence will show on the sonar's display in the form of random lines or dots whenever the boat is moving. NOTE: Some aluminum boats with strakes or ribs on the outside of the hull create large amounts of turbulence at high speed. These boats typically have large outboard motors capable of propelling the boat at speeds faster than 35 mph. Typically, a good transom location on aluminum boats is between the ribs closest to the engine. 3. The transducer should be installed with its face pointing straight down, if possible. For shoot-thru applications: Many popular fishing 10

At left, Sonar Page menu with Chart Speed command selected. At right, Chart Speed Control Bar.
If you do experiment with chart speed, remember to reset it to maximum when you resume trolling or moving across the water at higher speed. To change chart speed: 1. From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to CHART SPEED|ENT. 2. The Chart Speed Control Bar appears. Press to decrease chart speed; press to increase chart speed. 3. When it's set at the desired level, press EXIT.

Depth Cursor

The depth cursor consists of a horizontal line with a digital depth box on the right side. The numbers inside the box show the depth of the cursor. 47

Cursor line

Depth box At left, Sonar Page menu with Depth Cursor command selected. At right, sonar chart with the depth cursor active. The line indicates the large fish is 40.53 feet deep.
The cursor can be moved to any location on the screen, letting you pinpoint the depth of a target. 1. From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to DEPTH CURSOR|ENT. 2. The depth cursor appears. Press to lower the cursor line; press to raise the cursor line. 3. To clear the depth cursor, press EXIT.

Depth Range - Automatic

When turned on for the first time, the bottom signal is automatically placed in the lower half of the screen. This is called Auto Ranging and is part of the automatic function. However, depending upon the bottom depth and the current range, you can change the range to a different depth. To do this: 1. From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to DEPTH RANGE|ENT.
At left, Sonar Page menu with Depth Range command selected. At right, the Depth Range Control Scale.
2. The Depth Range Control Scale appears. Press or to select a different depth range. A dark bar highlights the selected range. Range numbers in gray cannot be selected. 3. When the new range is selected, press EXIT to clear the menu.

Depth Range - Manual

You have complete control over the range when the unit is in the manual mode. There are 12 depth ranges, from 5 feet to 800 feet.
To switch to Manual Depth Range:

and boat wakes can create enough tiny air bubbles to clutter much of the water column. In that case, a decrease in sensitivity is indicated to reduce some of the clutter. The control bar used to adjust sensitivity up or down is the same whether the unit is in the automatic or manual mode. In automatic you can adjust sensitivity up to 100 percent but the unit will limit your minimum setting. In auto, the unit will continue to make small adjustments, allowing for the setting you selected. In manual mode, you have complete control over sensitivity, with the ability to set it anywhere from zero to 100 percent. Once you select a level in manual, the unit will continue to use that exact sensitivity setting until you change it or revert to auto mode. To adjust sensitivity in auto mode: 1. Press MENU|ENT. 2. The Sensitivity Control Bar appears. Press to decrease sensitivity; press to increase sensitivity. When it's set at the desired level, press EXIT. (When you reach the maximum or minimum limit, a tone sounds.)
To adjust sensitivity in manual mode: 1. First, turn off Auto Sensitivity: from the Sonar Page, press MENU| to AUTO SENSITIVITY|ENT. 2. Press to SENSITIVITY|ENT and the Sensitivity Control Bar appears. Press or to pick a different sensitivity setting. When it's set at the desired level, press EXIT. To turn Auto Sensitivity back on: From the Sonar Page, press MENU| to AUTO SENSITIVITY|ENT|EXIT. 60
NOTE: To return to the original factory setting for Auto Sensitivity, see the entry in this section on Reset Options. If sensitivity is in manual mode, the Reset Options command will switch back to Auto and reset the factory setting at the same time.
For quicker sensitivity adjustments, try leaving the Sensitivity Control Bar on the screen as the chart scrolls. You can see the changes on the screen as you press the up or down arrows. This is handy when there's a lot of clutter in the water, and you are matching the sensitivity to rapidly changing water conditions.

Set Keel Offset

This unit measures water depth from the face of the transducer. Since the transducer is installed below the water surface, the distance displayed by the digital depth, chart depth scale, chart cursor or fish symbols is not the exact water depth. If the transducer is 1 foot below the surface, and the screen shows the water depth as 30 feet, then the actual depth is 31 feet. On sailboats or other large vessels with deep drafts, the distance between the transducer installation and the keel or lower engine unit can be several feet. In those cases, an inexact depth reading could result in grounding or striking underwater structure. The Keel Offset feature eliminates the need for the navigator to mentally calculate how much water is under his keel. Keel Offset lets you calibrate the digital depth indicators: chart depth scale, chart cursor depth and fish symbol depth displayed on the screen. To calibrate the depth indicators, first measure the distance from the face of the transducer to the lowest part of the boat. In this example, we will use 3.5 feet. We enter this as a negative 3.5 feet, which makes the depth indicators perform as if the transducer's lower in the water than it really is. 1. Press MENU|MENU| to SONAR SETUP| to SET KEEL OFFSET|ENT. 2. The Keel Offset dialog box appears. Press to so that the displayed number shows a minus () sign instead of the plus (+) sign. 3. Press until the number shows 3.5, then press EXIT. The depth indicators now accurately show the depth of water beneath the keel. NOTE: If knowing the exact depth of water beneath the keel is less important, you can calibrate the depth indicators so that they show the actual water depth from surface to bottom. To do this, first measure the 61

You can access the Main Menu from any of the display options by pressing MENU|MENU. To clear the menu screen and return to the page display, press EXIT.
The Main Menu commands and their functions are: Screen command: changes the contrast or brightness of the display screen. Sounds command: enables or disables the sounds for key strokes and alarms and sets the alarm style. Alarms command: turns GPS or sonar alarms on or off and changes alarm thresholds. Route Planning command: used to plan, view or navigate a route. My Trails command: shows, hides, creates and deletes plot trails. Also used to navigate or backtrack a trail. Cancel Navigation command: turns off the various navigation commands. Used to stop navigating after you have reached your destination waypoint or map cursor location; or after you reach the end of a route or trail. Sonar Setup command: sets various sonar options. GPS Setup command: sets various GPS receiver options. System Setup command: sets general configuration options. Sun/Moon Calculations command: finds the rising and setting time of the sun and the moon. Trip Calculator command: shows trip status and statistics. Timers command: controls the up timer, down timer and alarm clock settings. 75
The unit has two Pages that represent the two major operating modes. They are the Map Page and the Sonar Page. Each Page has several subset display options. They are accessed by pressing the PAGES key, then using or to select a Page, then or to select a display option. (Clear the Pages Menu by pressing EXIT.)
Pages Menu, showing some Map display options.
Sonar Page The Sonar Page displays the sonar chart, a view of the water column from the surface to the bottom. The chart scrolls across the screen from right to left, displaying signal echoes that represent fish, structure and the bottom. The Sonar Page is discussed in detail in Sec. 3. To get to the Sonar Page: Press PAGES| to SONAR|EXIT. Satellite Status Page The Satellite Status GPS Page, shown in the following images, provides detailed information on the status of the M56's satellite lock-on and position acquisition. To get to the Satellite Status Page: Press PAGES| to MAP| or to SATELLITES|EXIT. No matter what Page display you are on, a flashing current position indicator/question mark symbol and flashing GPS data displays indicate that satellite lock has been lost and there is no position confirmed. The Satellite Status Page shows you the quality and accuracy of the current satellite lock-on and position calculation. WARNING: Do not begin navigating with this unit until the numbers have stopped flashing!

Figure 1. Figure 2.

Navigating along a route: Fig. 1 shows the Navigation Page at the start of a route, heading straight for the first waypoint (Wpt 1). In Fig. 2, the traveler has arrived at Wpt 1; the arrival alarm has been triggered and the bearing arrow on the compass rose has turned to point toward Wpt 2, off to the northeast.
In Fig. 3 the traveler has turned northeast on his new course and is heading straight for Wpt 2, which is 0.28 miles away. Fig. 4 shows route navigation on the Map Page. In this figure, the traveler has reached Wpt 2 and is starting on the leg between Wpts 2 and 3.
Navigate a Route in Reverse Here's how you run a route backward, from the end waypoint to the beginning waypoint: 1. From the NAVIGATION PAGE, press MENU|ENT or from the MAP PAGE, press MENU|MENU| to ROUTE PLANNING|ENT. 2. Press to select route name|ENT| to REVERSE ROUTE|ENT| to NAVIGATE ROUTE|ENT. 3. Upon arrival at your destination, cancel navigation: press MENU|MENU| to CANCEL NAVIGATION|ENT| to YES|ENT.

Trails

Delete a Trail This is the command used to erase or delete a trail: Press MENU|MENU| to MY TRAILS|ENT| to trail name|ENT| to DELETE TRAIL|ENT| to YES|ENT.
You can also delete all trails at once: 1. Press MENU|MENU| to MY TRAILS|ENT. 2. Press to DELETE ALL|ENT| to YES|ENT. Edit a Trail Name To edit a trail name: press MENU|MENU| to MY TRAILS|ENT| to trail name|ENT|ENT. Press or to change the first character, then press 105
to the next character and repeat until the name is correct. Press ENT then EXIT|EXIT|EXIT|EXIT to return to the previous page display.
You can quickly call up the Edit Trail menu by selecting a trail on the map with the cursor. Simply move the cursor over a trail and a pop-up box appears. Press WPT and the Edit Trail menu opens.
At left, trail selected with map cursor. The box at the bottom of the screen shows distance and bearing from current position to the selected point on the trail. At right, the Edit Trail menu.

NOTE: When the position format is changed, it affects the way all positions are shown on all screens. This includes waypoints. To change the coordinate system, press ENT while COORDINATE SYSTEM is highlighted. Press the or arrow keys to highlight the desired format. Press ENT to select it. Press EXIT to erase the menus. To setup Loran TD: NOTE: If the Loran TD conversion is chosen, you must enter the local Loran chain identification for the master and slaves. Do this by selecting "Setup Loran TD" at the bottom of the "Coordinate System" menu and select the ID. Press EXIT to erase this menu.

Configure Loran TD menu.

Map Fix
Map Fix is used with charts or maps. This system asks for a reference position in latitude/longitude, which you take from a marked location on the map. It then shows the present position as distance on the map from that reference point. For example, if it shows a distance of UP 4.00" and LEFT 0.50", you then measure up four inches and to the left a half-inch from the reference point on the map to find your location. To configure a map fix: To use this format, you need to follow these steps in order. First, take your map of the area and determine a reference latitude/longitude. (Please note that in order for this system to work, the latitude/longitude lines must be parallel with the edge of the map. USGS maps are parallel, others may not be. Also, this works better with smaller scale maps.) The reference position can be anywhere on the map, but the closer it is to your location, the smaller the numbers will be that you'll have to deal with. 112
Once you've decided on a reference position, you must save it as a waypoint. (See the waypoint section for information on saving a waypoint.) After you've saved the reference position as a waypoint, exit from the waypoint screens. 1. Press MENU|MENU| to GPS SETUP|ENT. 2. Press to COORDINATE SYSTEM|ENT. 3. Press to SETUP MAP FIX|ENT. The following screen appears, and MAP SCALE is highlighted. Press ENT and enter the map's scale one numeral after another. The scale is generally at the bottom of the paper map. It's shown as a ratio, for example 1:24000. When the scale is entered, press EXIT and the unit returns to the Configure Map Fix screen.

You can pick any spot on the map to begin your simulation session by using the Initialize GPS command. This makes your unit think it's located at the position you select. See the following entry for details.

Initialize GPS

This command is handy when you are practicing in simulator mode. (See the previous entry for GPS Simulator.) In simulator mode, this command makes the unit operate as if it is sitting someplace other than its actual location. So, you and your unit could be located in Kansas City, but easily practice navigating in the ocean off Islamorada, Florida. 1. Press MENU|MENU| to GPS SETUP|ENT|ENT. 2. A message appears, telling you to move the cursor near the desired location and press ENT. When the message automatically clears, follow the message instructions. 3. In a moment, your present position marker arrow appears on the map in the location you selected with the cursor. The unit will consider that spot as its last known position until changed by either a live satellite lock-on or a new simulator location. 116

Map Auto Zoom

This receiver has an auto zoom feature that eliminates much of the button pushing that other brands of GPS receivers force you to make. It works in conjunction with the navigation features. First, start navigation to a waypoint. (See the waypoint section for more information on navigating to a waypoint.) Then, with the auto zoom mode on, the unit zooms out until the entire course shows, from the present position to the destination waypoint. As you travel toward the destination, the unit automatically begins zooming in one zoom range at a time always keeping the destination on the screen. To turn this feature on, from the MAP PAGE, press MENU| to AUTO ZOOM|ENT|EXIT. Repeat these steps to turn it off.

Map Data

This menu lets you turn the map off, if desired (which turns the map screen into a GPS plotter); turn off or on the pop-up map info boxes; or fill land areas with gray. You can also turn on or off Map Overlays, which display latitude and longitude grid lines or range rings on the map. To get to Map Data: From the Map Page, press MENU| to MAP DATA|ENT.
Map Menu, left, Map Data Menu, right.
Earth Map Detail From the Map Page, press MENU| to MAP DATA|ENT. Press ENT to adjust the level of mapping details shown. Select OFF to change the unit to a simple plotter. After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. 117
Pop-up Map Info From the Map Page, press MENU| to MAP DATA|ENT. Press to POPUP MAP INFORMATION. With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off.) After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. Fill Land With Gray From the Map Page, press MENU| to MAP DATA|ENT. Press to FILL LAND WITH GRAY. With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off.) After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. Map Overlays (Range Rings; Lat/Long Grid) The map screen can be customized with four range rings and/or grids that divide the screen into equal segments of latitude and longitude. Range rings are handy for visually estimating distances on the map. The ring diameters are based on the current zoom range. For example: at the 100 mile zoom, the screen will show two rings with your current position in the center. The large ring touching the left and right sides of the screen is 100 miles in diameter (same as the zoom range). The second smaller ring is 50 miles in diameter (always 1/2 the zoom range). The distance from your current position to the smaller ring (the ring's radius) is 25 miles (always 1/4 the zoom range). With the arrow keys and map cursor, you can scroll the map to see the third and fourth rings. In this example, the distance to the third ring is 75 miles and distance to the fourth ring is 100 miles from your current position. To set range rings: From the Map Page, press MENU| to MAP DATA|ENT. Press to RANGE RINGS. With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off.) After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. To set Lat/Long Grid: From the Map Page, press MENU| to MAP DATA|ENT. Press to LAT/LON GRID LINES. With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off.) After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display.

1. From the Map or Sonar page, press MENU| to OVERLAY DATA|ENT. 2. Press or to select Data Type|press or to Data Size|EXIT|EXIT. The selected data type will be displayed in the new size. (To change the font size for more than one Data Type at the same time, just follow the above steps, but make all the needed changes before you press Exit to clear the menu.)
If you wish, you can change the font size when you select a data type for the first time: 1. From the Map or Sonar page, press MENU| to OVERLAY DATA|ENT. 2. Press or to select Data Type|press or to select Data Size|ENT. The data will be shown in the new font size. To return to the previous page, press EXIT|EXIT.

Pop-up Help

Help is available for virtually all of the menu labels on this unit. By highlighting a menu item and leaving it highlighted for a few seconds, a "pop-up" message appears that describes the function of the menu item. This feature is on by default. To set up Popup Help: Press MENU|MENU| to SYSTEM SETUP|ENT| to POPUP HELP. With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off.) After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. 123
System Setup Menu, left, with Pop-up Help command highlighted. At right, this example shows the Pop-up Help message for the Sensitivity command, located on the Sonar Menu.
To reset all features to their factory defaults: Press MENU|MENU| to SYSTEM SETUP|ENT| to RESET OPTIONS|ENT| to YES|ENT. NOTE: Reset Options does not erase any waypoints, routes, icons, plot trails or sonar logs.
Screen Contrast and Brightness
To access the Screen menu, press MENU|MENU|ENT.

Once in the Screen menu:

To adjust the display's contrast: The CONTRAST slider bar is already selected. Press or to move the bar. The left end of the scale is minimum contrast; the right end is maximum contrast. 124
Screen Command, left, and Screen Menu with Contrast bar selected, right.
To adjust the display's brightness: Press to BRIGHTNESS. Press or to move the bar. The left end of the scale is minimum contrast; the right end is maximum contrast. To adjust the screen's display mode: Press to DISPLAY MODE|ENT|press or to select mode|EXIT.

Display Mode menu.

Set Language
This unit's menus are available in 10 languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Russian, Dutch and Finnish. To select a different language: 1. Press MENU|MENU| to SYSTEM SETUP|ENT. 2. Press to SET LANGUAGE|ENT. 3. Use or to select a different language and press ENT. All menus now appear in the language you selected. 125

Set Local Time

Using the correct local time setting is handy when estimating local arrival time while navigating. Also, the time and date are saved when a waypoint is created. To access the Set Local Time menu, you must first acquire your position. Once that is done: press MENU|MENU| to SYSTEM SETUP|ENT| to SET LOCAL TIME|ENT.

Sounds command, left. At right, the Sounds menu.

Once in the Sounds menu:

To set Key Press Sounds: With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off). After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. To set Alarm Sounds: Press to ALARM SOUNDS. With the option highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off). After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. To set Alarm Volume: Press to VOLUME. Press or to move the bar. The left end of the scale is low volume; the right end is high volume. After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display. To set Alarm Style: Press to ALARM STYLE|ENT. Press or to change the style, then press ENT. After the option is set, press EXIT|EXIT to return to the page display.

Track Smoothing

This is a factory setting on the GPS Setup menu that should always be left on. When stopped or traveling at slow speeds (such as walking or trolling), Track Smoothing prevents wandering of trails, the steering arrow, compass rose and a map in track-up mode.
Track Smoothing option, turned on.

Trail Options

There are several options you can use with trails. Some affect all trails, other options can be applied to a particular trail. You can change the way trails are updated, you can display or hide trails, create a new trail, delete a trail, etc.

General Trail Options

To access the Trails Menu: Press MENU|MENU| to MY TRAILS|ENT.
Main Menu, left, Trails Menu, center, Trail Options, right.
Delete All Trails To remove all of the trails from memory: from the Trails Menu, press to DELETE ALL|ENT| to YES|ENT. Update Active Trail Option This menu lets you change the way the trail updates occur. WARNING: If you uncheck the Update Trail option, automatic trail creation and recording will be turned off. You must turn it back on to record trails. The default setting is on. From the Trails Menu, press to TRAIL OPTIONS|ENT. With UPDATE TRAIL highlighted, press ENT to check it (turn on) and uncheck it (turn off).
Update Trail Criteria (Auto, Time, Distance)
The options are: automatic, time, or distance. When it's in the default automatic mode, the unit doesn't update the plot trail while you're traveling in a straight line. Once you deviate from a straight line, the unit "drops" a plot point (trail waypoint) onto the trail. This conserves plot trail points. If a plot trail uses all of the available points allotted to it, the beginning points are taken away and placed at the end of the trail.

A. To navigate to the waypoint, press ENT. (The Go To Waypoint command is already highlighted.) The unit will show navigation information to the waypoint. B. To find the waypoint, press to FIND ON MAP|ENT. The Map Page appears with the cursor highlighting the found waypoint. To clear these menus and return to the previous page, press EXIT repeatedly.
Section 10: Supplemental Material Datums Used by This Unit
WGS 1984 Default Adindan Mean for Ethiopia, Sudan Adindan Burkina Faso Adindan Cameroon Adindan Ethiopia Adindan Mali Adindan Senegal Adindan Sudan Afgooye Somalia Ain el Abd 1970 Bahrain Ain el Abd 1970 Saudi Arabia Anna 1 Astro 1965 Cocos Islands Antigua Island Astro 1943; Antigua (Leeward Islands) Arc 1950; Mean for Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Swaziland, Zaire, Zambia and Zimbabwe Arc 1950 - Botswana Bermuda 1957 - Bermuda Arc 1950 - Burundi Arc 1950 - Lesotho Arc 1950 - Malawi Arc 1950 - Swaziland Arc 1950 - Zaire Arc 1950 - Zambia Arc 1950 - Zimbabwe Arc 1960 - Mean for Kenya, Tanzania Ascension Island 1958 Ascension Island Astro Beacon E 1945 Iwo Jima Astro DOS 71/4 - St. Helena Island Astro Tern Island (FRIG) 1961 - Tern Island Astronomical Station 1952 - Marcus Island Australian Geodetic 1966 - Australia & Tasmania Australian Geodetic 1984 - Australia & Tasmania Ayabelle Lighthouse Djibouti Bellevue (IGN) - Efate & Erromango Islands Campo Inchauspe - Argentina Canton Astro 1966 Phoenix Islands Cape - South Africa Cape Canaveral - Bahamas, Florida Carthage - Tunisia Switzerland Chatham Island Astro 1971; New Zealand (Chatham Island) Chua Astro Paraguay Corrego Alegre Brazil Dabola Guinea Djakarta (Batavia) Indonesia (Sumatra) Camp Area Astro - Antarctica (McMurdo Camp Area) Bukit Rimpah - Indonesia (Bangka & Belitung Islands) Bissau - Guinea-Bissau Bogota Observatory Colombia
DOS 1968 New Georgia Islands (Gizo Island) Easter Island 1967 Easter Island European 1950 Mean for Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, West Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland European 1950 Mean for Austria, Denmark, France, West Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland European 1950 Mean for Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Syria European 1950 Cyprus European 1950 Egypt European 1950 England, Channel Islands, Ireland, Scotland, Shetland Islands European 1950 Finland, Norway European 1950 Greece European 1950 Iran
European 1950 Italy (Sardinia) European 1950 (Sicily) European 1950 Malta Ireland 1965 Ireland ISTS 061 Astro 1968 South Georgia Islands ISTS 073 Astro 1969 Diego Garcia Johnston Island 1961 Johnston Island Kandawala Sri Lanka Kerguelen Island 1949 Kerguelen Island Kertau 1948 West Malaysia & Singapore Kusaie Astro 1951 Caroline Islands L.C. 5 Astro 1961 Cayman Brac Island Leigon Ghana Liberia 1964 Liberia Luzon Philippines (Excluding Mindanao) Luzon Philippines (Mindanao)

LOWRANCE ELECTRONICS FULL ONE-YEAR WARRANTY
"We," "our," or "us" refers to LOWRANCE ELECTRONICS, INC., the manufacturer of this product. "You" or "your" refers to the first person who purchases this product as a consumer item for personal, family or household use. We warrant this product against defects or malfunctions in materials and workmanship, and against failure to conform to this product's written specifications, all for one (1) year from the date of original purchase by you. WE MAKE NO OTHER EXPRESS WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER CONCERNING THIS PRODUCT. Your remedies under this warranty will be available so long as you can show in a reasonable manner that any defect or malfunction in materials or workmanship, or any non-conformity with the product's written specifications, occurred within one year from the date of your original purchase, which must be substantiated by a dated sales receipt or sales slip. Any such defect, malfunction, or non-conformity which occurs within one year from your original purchase date will either be repaired without charge or be replaced with a new product identical or reasonably equivalent to this product, at our option, within a reasonable time after our receipt of the product. If such defect, malfunction, or non-conformity remains after a reasonable number of attempts to repair by us, you may elect to obtain without charge a replacement of the product or a refund for the product. THIS REPAIR, OR REPLACEMENT OR REFUND (AS JUST DESCRIBED) IS THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY AVAILABLE TO YOU AGAINST US FOR ANY DEFECT, MALFUNCTION, OR NON-CONFORMITY CONCERNING THE PRODUCT OR FOR ANY LOSS OR DAMAGE RESULTING FROM ANY OTHER CAUSE WHATSOEVER. WE WILL NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BE LIABLE TO ANYONE FOR ANY SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR OTHER INDIRECT DAMAGE OF ANY KIND. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty does NOT apply in the following circumstances: (1) when the product has been serviced or repaired by anyone other than us; (2) when the product has been connected, installed, combined, altered, adjusted, or handled in a manner other than according to the instructions furnished with the product; (3) when any serial number has been effaced, altered, or removed; or (4) when any defect, problem, loss, or damage has resulted from any accident, misuse, negligence, or carelessness, or from any failure to provide reasonable and necessary maintenance in accordance with the instructions of the owner's manual for the product. We reserve the right to make changes or improvements in our products from time to time without incurring the obligation to install such improvements or changes on equipment or items previously manufactured. This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other rights which may vary from state to state. REMINDER: You must retain the sales slip or sales receipt proving the date of your original purchase in case warranty service is ever required.

 

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