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Lowrance X-85

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Lowrance X-85 Operation Instruction

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Lowrance X-85Lexerd - Lowrance X85 TrueVue Anti-Glare Fish Finder Radar Screen Protector


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Brand: Lexerd
UPC: 894685040303


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Comments to date: 4. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
pedrosa420 9:13pm on Sunday, October 24th, 2010 
We have done our research on HDTVs (LCD & plasma) for a long time before making the purchase. Picture perfect None so far Unbelievable picture. Superb picture on factory settings.
khantoos 9:00pm on Monday, July 26th, 2010 
With all that being said I think this is a great tv and well worth the price. This TV has been outstanding so far. It has plenty of HDMI outputs, a really nice menu and it looks beautiful.
Daffo 10:14pm on Saturday, July 10th, 2010 
Disappointing performance I got this set as a replacement for a Sony Bravia W4500 which seemed to suffer from a visual colour banding defect caused by... Awsome TV Have been looking for about 2 years and settled on Panasonic Plasma 1080P

this fits the bill, Terestrial Tv is good and clear.
Adam 10:02am on Tuesday, March 16th, 2010 
Intro Buying a plasma is something I had been dreaming about ever since they hit the market over 10 years ago, and after many years of waiting.

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Documents

doc0

To Sonar Unit

POWER CONNECTIONS
RED WIRE BLACK WIRE 3 amp FUSE
TO SPEED/TEMP OR TEMP SENSORS (Not included)

12 VOLT BATTERY

SPEED/TEMPERATURE SENSORS This unit accepts up to three temperature sensors which can monitor surface water, live well, air, and virtually any other temperature. You do need to be careful when purchasing the temperature sensors, however. Each temperature sensor has its own "address". The sensors are labeled "Water", "T-2" (or Temp-2), and "T-3" (or Temp-3). If you want two (or more) temperature readings, you'll need to use the proper sensors. For example, you can't use two T-3 sensors. The sensors that will fit these units are: TS-1BK TS-2BK TS-3BK TS-12BK ST-TBK One sensor for "Water" temperature display. One sensor for "T-2" temperature display. One sensor for "T-3" temperature display. Two sensors for "Water" and "T-2" temperature displays. One speed sensor and one temperature sensor for "Speed" and "Water" displays.
You can combine these sensors in many combinations. See the list on the following page for temperature and speed sensor combinations.

Sensor Chart

(Note: Do not use these sensors in any other combination.) ST-TBK = 1 speed sensor and 1 temperature display ST-TBK + TS-2BK = 2 temp sensors and one speed sensor ST-TBK + TS-2BK + TS-3BK = 3 temp sensors and one speed sensor TS-1BK = 1 temperature sensor TS-12BK = 2 temperature sensors or TS-1BK + TS-2BK = 2 temperature sensors TS-12BK + TS-3BK = 3 temperature sensors or TS-1BK + TS-2BK +TS-3BK = 3 temperature sensors
Here's some sample wiring diagrams:

TS-12 BK

Two Temperature Sensors (Water and T-2)

POWER CABLE

TS-3 BK
Three Temperature Sensors (Water, T-2, and T-3)

ST-TBK

TS-2 BK
Three Temperature Sensors plus Speed (Water, T-2, T-3, and Speed)

LOWRANCE

192 kHz TRANSDUCER
TO SAM-50HPD (NOT INCLUDED)
CONNECTORS The diagram above shows the three connectors on the back of the sonar unit. Looking at the back of the unit, the 192 kHz transducer connector is at the far left. Plug the 192 kHz transducer in here. The center connector is for the power cable. The connector at the far right is for a serial cable that is included with the SAM-50HPD. This is the cable that allows the SAM to communicate with the sonar unit. See the SAM-50HPD's installation manual for more information.

Transducer Installation

Some of the models covered by this manual have a transom-mount transducer included. There two different transducers that could be packed with your unit. One is a 20 cone angle "Skimmer" transducer that can be mounted on the transom or epoxied inside certain boats to "shoot-thru" the hull. The other transducer is an 8 cone angle "Skimmer" transducer that is transom-mounted only. The 8 transducer has a kick-up mounting bracket helps prevent damage if the transducer strikes an object while the boat is moving. If the transducer does kick-up, the bracket can easily be pushed back in place without tools. Read this manual carefully before attempting the installation. Determine which of the mounting positions is right for your boat. Use extreme care if mounting the transducer inside the hull, since once it is epoxied into position, the transducer usually cannot be removed. Remember, the transducer location is the most critical part of a sonar installation.

2. Slide the transducer between the two ratchets. Temporally slide the bolt though the transducer assembly and hold it against the transom. Looking at the transducer from the side, check to see if it will adjust so that its face is parallel to the ground. If it does, then the A position is correct for your hull. If the transducers face isnt parallel with the ground, remove the transducer and ratchets from the bracket. Place the ratchets into the holes in the bracket with the letter B aligned with the dot stamped in the bracket. Reassemble the transducer and bracket and place them against the transom. Again, check to see if you can move the transducer so its parallel with the ground. If you can, then go to step 3. If it doesnt, repeat step 2, but use a different letter until you can place the transducer on the transom correctly.

RATCHETS

3. Once you determine the correct position for the ratchets, assemble the transducer as shown at left. Don't tighten the lock nut at this time.

NUT METAL WASHER

RUBBER WASHERS BOLT

METAL WASHER

CAUTION! CLAMP THE TRANSDUCER CABLE TO TRANSOM NEAR THE TRANSDUCER. THIS WILL HELP PREVENT THE TRANSDUCER FROM ENTERING THE BOAT IF IT IS KNOCKED OFF AT HIGH SPEED.

GOOD LOCATION

POOR LOCATION

POOR ANGLE GOOD LOCATION

4. Hold the transducer and bracket assembly against the transom. The transducer should be roughly parallel to the ground. The bottom of the transducer bracket should be in line with the bottom of the hull. Don't let the bracket extend below the hull! Mark the center of the slots for the mounting holes. Drill two 5/32" holes in the marked locations for the #10 screws supplied with the transducer.

TRANSOM

SIDE VIEW
5. Remove the transducer from the bracket and re-assemble it with the cable passing through the bracket over the bolt as shown above. Attach the transducer to the transom. Slide the transducer up or down until its aligned properly on the transom as shown above. Tighten the brackets mounting screws. Adjust the transducer so that its parallel to the ground and tighten the lock nut until it touches the flat washer, then add 1/4 turn. Dont over tighten the lock nut! If you do, the transducer wont kick-up if it strikes an object in the water. 6. Route the transducer cable to the sonar unit. Make certain to leave some slack inthe cable at the transducer as shown above. If possible, route the transducer cable away from other wiring on the boat. Electrical noise from the engines wiring, bilge pumps, VHF radio wires and cables, and aerators can be picked up by the sonar. Use caution when routing the transducer cable around these wires. IMPORTANT! Clamp the transducer cable to the transom close to the transducer. This can prevent the transducer from entering the boat if it is knocked off at high speed. 7. Make a test run to determine the results. If the bottom is lost at high speed, or if noise appears on the display, try sliding the transducer bracket down. This puts the transducer deeper into the water, hopefully below the turbulence causing the noise. Don't allow the transducer bracket to go below the bottom of the hull!

POOR LOCATION GOOD LOCATION POOR ANGLE
3. Dont mount the transducer directly behind strakes or ribs on the bottom of the hull. Typically, a good location on aluminum boats is between the ribs closest to the engine. 4. Once you determine the best location for the transducer, hold the bracket against the transom. The transducer should be roughly parallel to the ground. The bottom of the hull should be about halfway between the centerline of the transducer and its bottom. (See the illustration below.)
Mark the transom in the center of each slot in the transducer bracket. Now drill one hole in the center of each slot. Use #12 stainless steel screws (not included) to loosely attach the brackets to the transom. 5. Adjust the transducer and bracket so that the front of the transducer is slightly lower than the back. See the section on fish arches in this manual for proper transducer angles. Tighten all screws. Clamp the transducer cable to the transom close to the transducer. This will prevent the transducer from entering the boat should it be knocked off at high speed.
6. Route the transducer cable to the sonar unit. Keep the transducer cable away from other wiring on the boat, if possible. Electrical noise from engine wiring or bilge pumps can be picked up on the transducer cable. This can show up as unwanted interference on the sonar display.

FLAT-BOTTOM HULL

DEEP-"VEE" HULL
NOTE: Some aluminum boats with strakes or ribs on the outside of the hull create large amounts of turbulence at high speed. These boats typically have large outboard motors capable of propelling the boat at speeds over 35 mph. The transducer should be mounted as far below the hull as possible on these boats. This will place the face of the transducer below the turbulent water, allowing the sonar unit to work at high speeds. 7. Make a test run to determine the results. If there is interference on the display when running the boat at high speed, try lowering or changing the angle of the transducer. NOTE Periodically wash the transducer's face with soap and water to remove any oil film. Oil and dirt on the face will reduce the sensitivity or may even prevent operation. CAUTION! MAKE CERTAIN TO CLAMP THE TRANSDUCER CABLE TO THE TRANSOM NEAR THE TRANSDUCER. THIS WILL HELP PREVENT THE TRANSDUCER FROM ENTERING THE BOAT IF IT IS KNOCKED OFF AT HIGH SPEED.
KEYBOARD The keyboard has keys arranged in two vertical columns beneath the arrow keys. The menu key near the bottom left corner of the keyboard activates the first menu page. The other keys are used to activate the alarm menu, make menu selections, and change modes. MODE - Pressing this key switches the unit between different modes. MENU - Press this key to show the menus and gain access to most functions. ARROW KEYS - These keys are used to make menu selections and to move objects on the screen. ZOUT, ZIN - These keys let you zoom the screen in and out to see detail. ALARM - Press this key to activate any of the sonar alarms. PWR - This key turns the sonar unit and it's lights on and off. ENT, EXIT - These keys let you enter or erase values.

the left or right arrow keys to sequence through the available groups. When the desired group appears, press the EXIT key to erase the modes menu. Reprogram Windows Groups You can customize the window groups to meet your own fishing or boating situations. This unit gives you eight different windows that can be rearranged into many combinations. To reprogram a group, first go to the "System Setup" menu as shown at right. Next, highlight the "Reprogram Groups" label and press the right arrow key. A screen similar to the one shown at right appears. Press the right or left arrow keys to select the window group that you want reprogrammed. We'll customize group "H" in this example. Once the desired window group shows, press the up arrow key to reprogram it. The screen shown at the bottom of this page appears. The 1/4 chart appears in the upper right corner. Press the left or right arrow keys to view the available windows. When the desired window appears, press the up arrow key to select it. The unit adds this window to the selected group, then returns to this screen so you can select the next window. Once you've selected all of the windows for your group, it returns to normal operation with the customized screen showing. In this example, we changed group "H" to the one shown at the top of the next page.
Reset Window Groups To return all groups to the factory settings, use the "Preset Options" on the "System Setup" menu. To return only one group to its factory setting, select "reprogram groups" from the "System Setup" menu. The screen shown below right appears.
Press the left or right arrow key until the desired window group that you want to reset appears. When it appears, simply press the down arrow key and the unit will reset only that group. Press the EXIT key to erase the menu.
AUTOMATIC When the sonar unit is first turned on, the Automatic feature is enabled. This is indicated by the word AUTO at the top of the screen. The Automatic feature adjusts the sensitivity and range so the bottom signal is displayed in the lower half of the screen at all times. To turn Automatic off, first press the MENU key, then press the up or down arrow keys until the "AUTO" menu appears. Press the left arrow key to switch to the manual mode. The letters Man appear at the top of the screen, indicating the unit is in the manual mode. To turn Automatic on, repeat the above steps to get the auto menu, then press the right arrow key.

SENSITIVITY The sensitivity controls the ability of the unit to pick up echoes. A low sensitivity level excludes much of the bottom information, fish signals, and other target information. High sensitivity levels enables you to see this detail, but it can also clutter the screen with many undesired signals. Typically, the best sensitivity level shows a good solid bottom signal with Grayline and some surface clutter. When the it's in the Automatic mode, the sensitivity is automatically adjusted to keep a solid bottom signal displayed, plus a little more. This gives it the capability to show fish and other detail. However, situations occur where it becomes necessary to increase or decrease the sensitivity. This typically happens when you wish to see more detail, so an increase in sensitivity is indicated. The procedure to adjust it is the same whether the unit is in the automatic or manual mode. To adjust the sensitivity, press the MENU key, then press the up or down arrow keys until the "SENS" menu appears as shown above. The sensitivity menu has left and right arrows, plus a horizontal bar graph. The graph gives a visual indication of the sensitivity level. The number to the right of the bar graph shows the percentage of sensitivity in use. To increase the sensitivity level, press the right arrow key. As you press the key, the menus bar graph will grow wider and the percentage will increase in value. You can also see the difference on the chart record as it scrolls. When the sensitivity is at the desired level, release the key. To decrease the sensitivity level, press the left arrow key. The bar graph and percentage will decrease. When the sensitivity is at the desired level, release the key. When you reach either the maximum or minimum limit, a tone sounds. To erase the menu, press the EXIT key.
RANGE - Automatic When turned on for the first time, the unit automatically places the bottom signal in the lower half of the screen. This is called Auto Ranging and is part of the automatic function. Typically, the range cannot be changed manually while the unit is in automatic, as shown at right. However, depending upon the bottom depth and the current range, you can change the range to a different depth. In the example screen shown below, the bottom depth has descended to a point where you can change the range to 150 feet. To do this, simply press the right arrow key while the Auto Range menu is displayed. When you're finished with this menu, press the EXIT key to erase it.
RANGE - Manual You have complete control over the range when the sonar is in the manual mode. To change the range, first make certain the unit is in the manual mode. Next, press the MENU key and the up or down arrow keys until the range menu appears as shown at right. Press the left or right arrow keys to decrease or increase the range. The available ranges are 0-5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 100, 150, 200, 300, 500, 800, and 1000 feet. After the desired range is displayed, press the EXIT key to erase the range menu. NOTE: The depth capability depends on the frequency selection, transducer installation, water and bottom conditions, and other factors.

ZOOM - MANUAL MODE The Z-IN (zoom-in) and Z-OUT (zoom-out) keys enlarge and reduce the size of the echoes on the screen when the unit is in the manual mode, the same as the automatic mode. However, you can manually adjust the zoom when the unit is in the manual mode. To do this, press the MENU key, then press the right or left arrow keys until the "CHART ZOOM" menu appears. Now press the right arrow key. A screen similar to the one at right appears. This is the split-screen zoom menu. A zoom bar shows at the far right side of the screen. All echoes between the top and bottom of the zoom bar are shown on the left side of the screen. Pressing the up or down arrow keys moves the zoom bar up or down. As you adjust the zoom bar, the range changes on the left side of the screen at the same time. To return to the full-screen mode, simply press the EXIT key. This also erases the zoom bar and move zoom menu. GRAYLINE GRAYLINE lets you distinguish between strong and weak echoes. It paints gray on targets that are stronger than a preset value. This allows you to tell the difference between a hard and soft bottom. For example, a soft, muddy or weedy bottom returns a weaker signal which is shown with a narrow or no gray line. A hard bottom returns a strong signal which causes a wide gray line. If you have two signals of equal size, one with gray and the other without, then the target with gray is the stronger signal. This helps distinguish weeds from trees on the bottom, or fish from structure. GRAYLINE is adjustable. Since GRAYLINE shows the difference between strong and weak signals, adjusting the sensitivity may require a different GRAYLINE level, also. The level chosen by the sonar unit at power on is usually adequate for most conditions. Experiment with your unit to find the GRAYLINE setting thats best for you. To adjust the GRAYLINE level, press the MENU key, then press the up or
down arrow keys until the GRAYLINE menu appears. A screen similar to the one at right appears. Press the left arrow key to decrease the gray level or the right arrow key to increase it. The percentage of GRAYLINE in use changes as the arrow keys are pressed. The bar chart also gives a graphical indication of the GRAYLINE level. You can see the change on the screen (both on the menu and on the chart record) as you press the keys. After youve finished, press the EXIT key to erase the menu. CHART SPEED The rate echoes scroll across the screen is called the chart speed. Its adjustable by first pressing the menu key, then pressing the up or down arrow keys until the "CHT SPD" (chart speed) menu appears as shown below left. Increase the chart speed by pressing the right arrow key or decrease it by pressing the left arrow key. The percentage of chart speed in use changes as the arrow keys are pressed. The bar chart also gives a graphical indication of the chart speed. You can see the change on the screen (both on the menu and on the chart record) as you press the keys. After youve made the adjustment, press the EXIT key to erase the menu.

CHART SPEED MENU

CHART STOP MENU
To stop the chart, press the menu key, then press the up or down arrow keys until the "CHART" menu appears as shown above right. Press the left arrow key to stop the chart. To start the chart again, press the right arrow key.
FISH ID The Fish ID feature identifies targets that meet certain conditions as fish. The microcomputer analyses all echoes and eliminates surface clutter, thermoclines, and other signals that are undesirable. In most instances, remaining targets are fish. The Fish ID feature displays symbols on the screen in place of the actual fish echoes. There are four fish symbol sizes: tiny, small, medium, and large. These are used to designate the relative size between targets. In other words, it displays a small fish symbol when it thinks a target is a small fish, a medium fish symbol on a larger target, etc. The microcomputer is sophisticated, but it can be fooled. It can't distinguish between fish and other suspended objects such as trotlines, turtles, submerged floats, air bubbles, etc. Individual tree limbs extending outwards from a group of limbs is the hardest object for the Fish ID feature to distinguish from fish. You may see Fish ID symbols on the screen when actually, there are no fish. Practice with the unit in both the Fish ID mode and without to become more familiar with the Fish ID feature. When the unit is turned on for the first time, the Fish ID feature is automatically turned off. To turn the Fish ID feature on, press the menu key, then press the arrow keys until the FISH ID menu appears. Press the right arrow key to turn the fish ID feature on. To turn the Fish ID feature off again, repeat the above steps, but press the left arrow key until "OFF" is highlighted. Any targets the microcomputer determines are fish will be displayed as fish symbols. Remember, the Fish ID feature cant be used when the unit is in the manual mode. If you turn the Fish ID feature on when the unit is in manual, the microcomputer will turn the automatic feature on. If you turn automatic off when the Fish ID feature is on, the Fish ID feature will be turned off also. FISHTRACK The FishTrack feature shows the depth of a fish symbol when it appears on the display. This lets you accurately gauge the depth of targets. This feature is available only when the Fish ID feature is on.
When the unit is first turned on, FishTrack is off. To turn the FishTrack feature on, press the menu key, then press the up or down arrow keys until the FISH ID menu appears. Now press the right arrow key. Pressing it once switches the Fish ID feature on, but leaves FishTrack off. To turn FishTrack on, press the right arrow key again, which highlights the "TRACK" label on the Fish ID menu. CHART SETUP You can customize the chart screen. To do this, press the MENU key, then press the up or down arrow keys until the "CHART SETUP" menu appears. Now press the right arrow key. The screen shown at right appears. The digital depth display at the top left corner of the screen normally shows in large numbers. You can change this to smaller numbers or turn it off completely using the "Show Digital" menu at the top of this screen. You can also turn the temperature, speedometer, distance log, zoom bar, zone alarm bar, and cursor on or off using this menu. See below for more information on these items.

setting. Both depth alarms work only off the digital bottom depth signals. No other targets will trip these alarms. If you turn the digital off, the depth alarms will be inoperative. These alarms can be used at the same time or individually. CAUTION! The depth alarms are turned off when the FASTRAK mode is turned on! To adjust the shallow alarm, highlight the "Shallow Depth" label. To adjust the deep alarm, highlight the "Deep Depth" label. Both alarms adjust identically. We'll use the shallow alarm as an example. Highlight the "Shallow Depth" label, then press the right arrow key. The screen shown at right appears. Use the up or down arrow keys to select the number, the right and left keys to move from number to number in the depth. For example, to set the shallow alarm depth to 10 feet, press the right arrow key once, then press the up arrow key once. The changes the second "0" to a "1". Next, press the right arrow key again and press the down arrow key once. This changes the "1" at the end of the number to a "0". The depth now shows 10 feet. Press the ENT key to accept this setting. The unit returns to the alarms menu, showing a shallow depth of 10 feet. Now you can activate the alarm by highlighting the "Shallow Alm" label and pressing the right arrow key. With the shallow alarm set at ten feet, anytime the digital display goes below ten feet, the shallow alarm sounds. Set the deep alarm in the same manner. If the bottom depth reading goes below the deep alarm setting, the deep alarm will sound.
ZONE ALARM The zone alarm is triggered when any echo passes inside the zone alarm bar, shown on the right side of the screen. To turn the zone alarm on, highlight the "Zone Alarm" label on the alarms menu, then press the right arrow key. To adjust the zone alarm, highlight the "Zone Adjust" label, then press the right arrow key. A screen similar to the one at right appears. To adjust the top of the zone bar higher or lower, press the up or down arrow keys while the up and down arrows are surrounding the "Upper Zone" on the screen as shown above. To adjust the bottom of the zone bar, first press the right arrow key to move the arrows to the "Lower Zone" on the screen, then use the up or down arrow keys. When the zone alarm is set, press the EXIT key to erase the menus. FISH ALARM Use the fish alarm for a distinctive audible alarm when fish or other suspended objects are detected by the Fish I.D. feature. A different tone sounds for each fish symbol size shown on the display. To turn the fish alarm on, press the ALARM key, then highlight the "Fish Alarm" label and press the right arrow key. The unit will revert to the sonar display with the fish alarm turned on. Repeat the above steps to turn the fish alarm off. Note: If the unit is in the manual mode, turning the Fish Alarm on will also turn the automatic mode and Fish ID on, also. ADJUST CHART SURFACE CLARITY (SCC) The markings extending downward from the zero line on the chart are called surface clutter. These markings are caused by wave action, boat wakes, temperature inversion, and other natural causes. The Surface Clarity Control (SCC) reduces or eliminates surface clutter signals from the display. SCC varies the

Temperature Graph Some of the screens have a temperature graph, as shown at right. Normally, the temperature graph has a 2 range. On the screen shown at right, the temperature graph has a range from 71 to 73. You can change this range to 4 or 10 using the "Temp Graph Scale" label on the Units of Measure menu. Highlight that label, then press the right arrow key until the desired temperature graph range is highlighted. Press the EXIT key to erase the menu. Reset Distance Log If you have a speed sensor attached, the unit starts counting the distance you've travelled each time you turn it on. You can reset this distance to zero by turning the unit off and on again, however, it's easier to highlight the "Reset Distance Log" label on the System Setup menu, then press the right arrow key. This resets the log and keeps you in the System Setup menu. To erase this menu, press the EXIT key. Preset Options The unit "remembers" all settings such as units of measure, auto/manual, sensitivity, even when power is removed from the unit. To return the unit to the factory settings, highlight the "Preset Options" label on the "System Setup" menu, then press the right arrow key. It returns to the full chart screen with all settings returned to their factory values.
Keel Offset The sonar measures water depth from the face of the transducer. Since the transducer is below the surface of the water, this distance is not the exact water depth. If the transducer is one foot below the surface, and the sonar reports the water depth as 30 feet, then the depth is actually 31 feet. You can calibrate the depth reading using the keel offset feature. First, highlight the "Keel Offset" label on the "System Setup" menu, then press the right arrow key. The screen shown at right appears. The current bottom depth shows in the upper left corner of the screen. The keel offset shows in the upper right corner. In this example, we need to change the keel offset so that the sonar will add one foot to the depth, since the transducer is one foot below the surface.

NOISE A major cause of sonar problems is electrical noise. This usually appears on the sonars display as random patterns of dots or lines. In severe cases, it can completely cover the screen with black dots, or cause the unit operate erratically, or not at all. To eliminate or minimize the effects of electrical noise, first try to determine the cause. With the boat at rest in the water, the first thing you should do is turn all electrical equipment on the boat off. Make certain the engine is off, also. Turn the sonar unit on, then turn off ASP (Advanced Signal Processing). There should be a steady bottom signal on the display. Now turn on each piece of electrical equipment on the boat and view the effect on the sonars display. For example, turn on the bilge pump and view the sonar display for noise. If no noise is present, turn the pump off, then turn on the VHF radio and transmit. Keep doing this until all electrical equipment has been turned on, their effect on the sonar display noted, then turned off. If you find noise interference from an electrical instrument, trolling motor, pump, or radio, try to isolate the problem. You can usually reroute the sonar units power cable and transducer cable away from the wiring that is causing the interference. VHF radio antenna cables radiate noise when transmitting, so be certain to keep the sonars wires away from it. You may need to route the sonar units power cable directly to the battery to isolate it from other wiring on the boat. If no noise displays on the sonar unit from electrical equipment, then make certain everything except the sonar unit is turned off, then start the engine. Increase the RPM with the gearshift in neutral. If noise appears on the display, the problem could be one of three things; spark plugs, alternator, or tachometer wiring. Try using resistor spark plugs, alternator filters, or routing the sonar units power cable away from engine wiring. Again, routing the power cable directly to the battery helps eliminate noise problems. Make certain to use the in-line fuse supplied with the unit when wiring the power cable to the battery. When no noise appears on the sonar unit after all of the above tests, then the noise source is probably cavitation. Many novices or persons with limited experience make hasty sonar installations which function perfectly in shallow water, or when the boat is at rest. In nearly all cases, the cause of the malfunction will be the location and/or angle of the transducer. The face of the transducer must be placed in a location that has a smooth flow of water at all boat speeds. Read the transducer installation section in this manual for the best mounting position.

LOWRANCE ELECTRONICS FULL ONE-YEAR WARRANTY
We", our, or us refers to LOWRANCE ELECTRONICS, the manufacturer of this product. You or your refers to the first person who purchases this product as a consumer item for personal, family, or household use. We warrant this product against defects or malfunctions in materials and workmanship, and against failure to conform to this products written specifications, all for one year (1) from the date of original purchase by you. WE MAKE NO OTHER EXPRESS WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER CONCERNING THIS PRODUCT. Your remedies under this warranty will be available so long as you can show in a reasonable manner that any defect or malfunction in materials or workmanship, or any non-conformity with the products written specifications, occurred within one year from the date of your original purchase, which must be substantiated by a dated sales receipt or sales slip. Any such defect, malfunction, or non-conformity which occurs within one year from your original purchase date will either be repaired without charge or be replaced with a new product identical or reasonably equivalent to this product, at our option, within a reasonable time after our receipt of the product. If such defect, malfunction, or non-conformity remains after a reasonable number of attempts to repair by us, you may elect to obtain without charge a replacement of the product or a refund for the product. THIS REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND (AS JUST DESCRIBED) IS THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY AVAILABLE TO YOU AGAINST US FOR ANY DEFECT, MALFUNCTION, OR NON-CONFORMITY CONCERNING THE PRODUCT OR FOR ANY LOSS OR DAMAGE RESULTING FROM ANY OTHER CAUSE WHATSOEVER. WE WILL NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BE LIABLE TO ANYONE FOR ANY SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR OTHER INDIRECT DAMAGE OF ANY KIND. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty does NOT apply in the following circumstances: (1) when the product has been serviced or repaired by anyone other than us, (2) when the product has been connected, installed, combined, altered, adjusted, or handled in a manner other than according to the instructions furnished with the product, (3) when any serial number has been effaced, altered, or removed, or (4) when any defect, problem, loss, or damage has resulted from any accident, misuse, negligence, or carelessness, or from any failure to provide reasonable and necessary maintenance in accordance with the instructions of the owners manual for the product. We reserve the right to make changes or improvements in our products from time to time without incurring the obligation to install such improvements or changes on equipment or items previously manufactured. This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other rights which may vary from state to state. REMINDER: You must retain the sales slip or sales receipt proving the date of your original purchase in case warranty service is ever required.

How to Obtain Service

(Canadian Customers Only)
We back your investment in quality products with quick, expert service and genuine Lowrance replacement parts. If you need service or repairs, contact the Lowrance Factory Customer Service Department at the toll-free number listed below. A technician may be able to solve the problem and save you the inconvenience of returning your unit. You will be asked for your unit's serial number.

800-324-1356

Canada Only. Monday through Friday 8:00 A.M. - 8:00 P.M. Central Time.
(International Customers Only)
If you need service or repairs, contact the dealer in the country you purchased your unit. WARRANTY REPAIR WILL BE HONORED ONLY IN THE COUNTRY UNIT WAS PURCHASED. Please follow the shipping instructions shown below on this page if you have to mail your unit to the dealer. For proper testing, repair, and service, send a brief note with the product describing the problem. Be sure to include your name, return shipping address, and a daytime telephone number.

Shipping Information

When sending a product for repair, we recommend you do the following: 1. Always use the original shipping container and filler material the product was packed in when shipping your product. 2 Always insure the parcel against damage or loss during shipment. Lowrance does not assume responsibility for goods lost or damaged in transit. 3. For proper testing, repair, and service, send a brief note with the product describing the problem. Be sure to include your name, return shipping address, and a daytime telephone number.
Accessory Ordering Information
To order accessories such as power cables or transducers, please contact: 1. Your local marine dealer. Most quality dealers that handle marine electronic equipment should be able to assist you with these items. Consult your local telephone directory for listings. 2. Canadian customers only can write: Lowrance/Eagle Canada, 919 Matheson Blvd., E. Mississauga, Ontario L4W2R7 or fax 905-629-3118

(U.S.A. Only)

We back your investment in quality products with quick, expert service and genuine Lowrance replacement parts. If you're in the United States and you have questions, please contact the Factory Customer Service Department using our toll-free number listed below. You must send the unit to the factory for warranty service or repair. Please call the factory before sending the unit. You will be asked for your unit's serial number. Use the following tollfree number:

U.S.A.only. Monday through Friday 8:00 A.M. - 8:00 P.M. Central time, except holidays.
Your unit is covered by a full one-year warranty. (See inside for complete warranty details.) If your unit fails and the failure is not covered by the original warranty, Lowrance has a flat-rate repair policy that covers your unit and accessories packed with the unit at the factory. There is a 180-day warranty on all non-warranty repairs from the factory, which is similar to the original warranty, but is for 180 days rather than one year. For further details, please call us at the above number.
To order accessories such as power cables or transducers, please contact:
1) Your local dealer. Most quality dealers that handle marine electronic equipment should be able to assist you with these items. Consult your local telephone directory for listings. 2) LEI Extras, Inc. P.O. Box 129 Catoosa, OK 74015-0129 or call 800-324-0045 (USA orders only.)
NOTICE! The storage temperature for your unit is from -4 degrees to +167 degrees Fahrenheit (-20 degrees to +75 degrees Celsius). Extended storage in temperatures higher or lower than specified will damage the liquid crystal display in your unit. This type of damage is not covered by the warranty. For more information, contact the factory's Customer Service Department or your local service center. LITHO IN U.S.A. 988-0133-46

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Be a Control Freak

Figure 1: Allen Chantry with a 36" Lake Chelan laker
I guide year round on Lake Chelan in North Central Washington, primarily by trolling for Lake Trout. I mostly fish at depths ranging from 100 to 300 feet. I am fishing for very well fed fish that will not compete for food, and most certainly will not pursue a meal aggressively. These are almost always neutral to negative fish. When people ask me about how to fish this lake effectively, I always, always emphasize two factors. They are depth control and speed control. These factors, in turn determine two of the most important components in the formula for catching fish. These formula components are location and presentation. Depth control allows you to troll at the precise place in the water column where the fish are, voila, you are in the correct location. Speed control allows you to fine tune your location, but also, determines the effectiveness of your presentation. There are a lot of ways to spend your money to allow you a lesser or greater degree of precision in depth and speed control in trolling. As someone whom people depend on day in and day out to produce fish, I have come to rely on six tools and their interaction to be very precise with my depth control and speed control. In order of expense from most to least, they are: a Nautamatic TR-1 kicker autopilot & throttle control; Scotty electric downriggers; a Lowrance X-85 Depthfinder; a Lowrance Global Map 100 Global Positioning System (GPS); a Luhr-Jensen Luhr-Speed Indicator; and the book: Precision Trolling: by Mark Romanack. With these tools, even fishing at great depth in highly variable conditions I can control my location and presentation very precisely.
I use the Nautamatic TR-1 Autopilot to control my direction and the speed of the engine. This device connects your 4-stroke outboard kicker motor to a remote control through a gyro and hydraulic system. I am clueless as to how it all works. All I know is that it works, and so far, trouble free for three years. The beauty of the directional control with this device is that it doesnt just hold the motor at a certain angle, it steers the boat towards a distant object, constantly making minute adjustments. The throttle control allows you to control the rpms of your motor very precisely. Additionally, it interfaces with my GPS allowing me to lock into a waypoint that I have marked with my GPS so I can hit a concentration of fish over and over again with a high degree of precision. I know of no other product that does this as well.
Figure 2: Nautamatic TR-1 kicker autopilot remote control
My Scotty electric downriggers allow me to place the 15-pound cannonballs that I use at specific depths. It has proven to be able to lower and retrieve the heavy weights that I use very precisely. I use electrics rather than manuals because I fish at depths in excess of 100 feet almost 100% of the time. If I fished less than 100 feet deep the majority of my time on the water, I would probably stay with the manual downrigger based on initial expense. I selected Scottys after watching what guides and serious fishermen use here in the West. I make hundreds of adjustments a day as I am constantly working to keep my lure working perfectly at 5 to 10 feet off the bottom. They have proven reliable and virtually maintenance free. Not only do these units lower and retrieve 15-pound cannonballs all day long. But once, I retrieved the tow hoop that had broken off of a ski boat (made of stainless steel) and ski rope (with handle still attached) that weighed an additional 20 pounds along with my cannonball when I snagged that mess from the bottom in 185 feet of water. The downrigger was not damaged at all. One cautionary note is that the digital readout on the downrigger is merely a counter of revolutions of the spool and should serve only as reference point. It does not tell you how deep you are fishing. How much cable is out in feet is a function of how much cable you started with as well as the number of revolutions of the spool. In my case, since I spool up with 500 feet of cable, the diameter of the spool is larger, so each revolution is actually more than one foot. Additionally, how deep you are is a function not only of how much cable you have out, but is also dependent on the speed you are going which determines the amount of blowback, or more clearly, the angle your cable is

dragged back from the vertical plane due to water resistance on the lure, fishing line, downrigger ball and downrigger cable.
Figure 3: Scotty electric downrigger
My Lowrance X-85 Depthfinder with its 3,000 watts of power allow me to track the bottom in deep water and mark fish in deep water. I point my transducer approximately 5 degrees forward of vertical so I can anticipate depth changes since I am fishing very close to the bottom almost all the time. When I upgraded to this higher powered sonar unit, my confidence improved dramatically, I began marking fish much more consistently at over 150 feet of water or even over 250 feet depths. I am ogling Lowrances more powerful color unit the XM-16, but so far, the X-85 has performed very well for me.
Figure 4: Lowrance X-85 depthfinder
My Lowrance Global Map 100 along with its accompanying mapping software, is a GPS used to locate, exactly where I currently am, to mark waypoints that I can return to and to track my route so I can see graphically where I have been on the lake using satellite and computer technology. This unit interfaces with my autopilot and allows me to lock onto a specific point, which is usually where I have marked concentrations of fish with my Depthfinder.
Figure 5: Lowrance Global Map 100 GPS
Probably the most overlooked and low-tech tool in the arsenal of the trollers toolbox is a mechanical speed indicator. My Luhr-Speed trolling speed indicator is the tool I check the most. I call it my Fred Flintstone speedometer. Basically, it is a ball in the water dragged backwards by water pressure attached by a string to a needle that is in turn pulled across a graduated faceplate. I determine the speed that a lure needs to be trolled at by watching it in the water next to the boat. I then note the speed on my indicator. Then, it doesnt matter what the wind does, what the drag is from the downrigger balls and cable, I can precisely duplicate that speed. This is so important! It is particularly important with speed sensitive lures that are designed to be pulled at less than 2 knots. Sometimes missing your target speed by one tenth of a knot can reduce your bite rate by half! It is the difference between consistently hooking fish and taking a long slow boat ride with an accidental fish every so often. The speed indicators on my Depthfinder and my GPS simply are not accurate enough at speeds under two knots. There are other speed indicators on the market that I have not used and just cant say whether they are better or not. This one costs about $45 retail and is very simple to install. Once you get used to it, you will feel hamstrung when you fish on a boat without it. The one circumstance where this tool is not as useful would be where the speed of the boat over the water is different than the speed of your downrigger balls at depth due to different currents at different depths. Then, a device like the Sub-Troll 900 would be better.

Figure 6: Luhr Jensen - Luhr Speed Indicator
Finally, the book: Precision Trolling by Mark Romanack is a tool that I consult regularly. It tells me, the distance my lure is below my downrigger ball based on my speed, the diameter of the line I am using, how far the lure is from the downrigger ball and what make and model of lure I am using. This book provides the troller with a wealth of information. Using these tools I routinely connect with neutral to negative lake trout that are anywhere from 120 to 280 deep with a high degree of certainty that the lure I am trolling is right where I want it to be doing just what I want it to do. Do you need these tools? I can tell you that my bite rate has increased with the addition of each of these tools.
Figure 7: Sandra Jones and Granddaughter Mikayla Wilson with an 18# Lake Chelan Lake Trout

 

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