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Icom IC-V80

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Comments to date: 6. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
mwooldridge 12:38am on Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 
Heralded by the headphone enthusiast community as the KSC75 of ear buds. Very good....when they work! Bought my 2nd pair of these in February. Great value, and a decent sound...
cyber4681 2:48am on Wednesday, August 25th, 2010 
Hello Bargain Hunters! lightweight, great sound, wide range, comfy none Placement of the headset in the ear of the Creative EP630 with coverage from rubber provide a fantastic experience audio in MP3 format.
ShoeMaker 5:19am on Tuesday, June 1st, 2010 
It was fast fun and easy. Stuck the cassette in plug in my MP3 player and listen to good quality music with no static. Easy Setup","Good Quality".
smudge 8:20pm on Friday, May 21st, 2010 
Amazing Creative EP-630 In-Ear Noise-Isolating Headphones (Black) I got a pair of these when I ordered my XPS computer system back in 2008. Small price for big sound For $16.00, what can you say! I was quite pleased with the sound for such a small price. For this great price, not bad So I ordered these on Monday, early morning and after the item was finally shipped.
-carley_64 4:44am on Saturday, April 24th, 2010 
The silicone fittings are changeable so you can choose the right size for your ears. Bad thing about that is that they tend to fall off now and then.
aerthling 2:20am on Monday, April 12th, 2010 
Not only do I like bacon, but I love the way it smells when it is cooking Inexpensive, but sound great The wire is a little thin. Not a big deal. i used egg saver and got it in 4 days....not that bad as i thought it would be 1. good bass ; 2. crisp sound ; 3.

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

PRODUCT REVIEW

ICOM IC-V80 Handheld VHF Transceiver
Reviewed by Rick Palm, K1CE ARRL Contributing Editor Handheld radios are a dime a dozen (almost literally there are a lot of choices for around $100), so what sets one model apart from the others? That was the main question on my mind as I tested the IC-V80, along with my mindset and perspective as an ARES emergency communications field operator. If a transceiver can get the job done under the potentially extreme conditions of a disaster area, then surely it would meet the more benign needs of casual operation. standards in my little field test. Test #2 I tried the same set-up, only this time I rode my noisy Harley-Davidson Sportster to see if I could still copy the audio from the radio. Result: I could copy voice transmissions with no problem with my helmet on, engine idling and the motorcycle stopped. However, it was too much to ask of the radio when I was actually riding with the engine louder and the wind blowing in my face. I could not copy the voice, and indeed I could hardly hear it at all. The bottom line as far as audio output goes, is that it is superior to other radios I have used and an asset in field conditions with high ambient noise levels. This is a good selling point for this radio.

Key Measurements Summary

SINAD 0.25
Receiver Sensitivity (12dB SINAD, V)

89@10 MHz 90

Receiver 3rd-Order Dynamic Range (dB)
Taking It for a Test Ride
To answer this question and others, I took the IC-V80 out to try to simulate demanding, if not extreme, conditions: I rode my bicycle up and down coastal route A1A on the upper east coast of Florida with the high ambient noise of the ocean and wind, with the review unit tucked in a Camelbak waist pouch strapped around my back. The flexible antenna stuck up through a notch sewn on top of the little pack (a perfect way to carry a small handheld, by the way: the model is the Camelbak FLASHLO with the water bladder removed). One of ICOMs main claims for this radio is loud audio, which would obviously be a huge asset in a noisy disaster area (think mammoth government response vehicles lumbering around, and banks of gasoline engine driven generators chugging away). ICOM says that the unit puts out 750 mW of loud and intelligible audio from a larger (36 mm) speaker, employing a BTL (bridge-tied load) amplifier that doubles the audio output. Note that the Lab tests were performed with the external speaker jack, which has a lower audio output rating. See Table 1 for details. I was able to easily hear the other operators intelligible voice from a local repeater as I rode along the ocean, albeit with the volume turned up to the maximum limit. But, even with max audio, the audio was easily understandable. In this regard, the claims for this unit meet actual performance

65@20 kHz 70

Ruggedly Built
Also up for consideration were other aspects I was interested in as an emergency field operator, especially ruggedness. In trying field conditions, you know that the radio will be dropped, kicked, sat on, dusted with dirt and grime, and splashed by rain, oil, gasoline and other fluids. While I didnt drop kick it around, the unit

ChRej 50

Adjacent Channel Rejection (dB)

IF Rejection (dB)

115** 110

Img 60

Image Rejection (dB)

Snd 100

Audio Output (mW)

T-R 250

Tx-Rx Turnaround Time (ms)

** Off Scale

Bottom Line
The IC-V80 is a rugged 2 meter handheld with attractive features for emergency communications as well as daily use.

Mark J. Wilson, K1RO

Product Review Editor

k1ro@arrl.org

March 2011 53
does seem to be tough. The unit comes with a robust belt clip, not a flimsy little clip as with some radios I have owned, and I have had a lot of them over the years. The manufacturer claims that the unit is water-resistant (which does not equate to waterproof, in my understanding) and has protection against dust and dirt under an industrial code of IP54. (IP is an Ingress Protection rating used to specify the environmental protection electrical enclosure of electrical equipment. The first number refers to protection against solid objects 5 in this case means that the unit is protected against dust limited ingress. The second number refers to protection against liquids 4 in this case means that the unit is protected against water sprayed from all directions limited ingress permitted. Search the Internet for more info on this rating system.) ICOM also claims the unit has been tested to and passed 11 categories of MIL-STD-810 environmental tests. I personally like, and have always liked, the classic, bombproof BNC connector and flexible antenna system that is employed on this radio. There is plenty of transmitter power, also potentially important in remote or mountainous search and rescue (SAR) or disaster areas: the HIGH power setting will yield 5.5 W (see Table 1 for tests conducted by the ARRL Lab). A more conservative (and battery saving) 2.5 W is the MID level, and the LOW level provides 0.5 W output. ICOM claims that the operator can get up to 13 hours of operating time with the supplied 7.2 V 1400 mAh NiMH battery pack (BP-264), or up to 19 hours with the optional Li-ion battery pack (BP-265). The size of the unit seems perfect to me not too big, like the old units of the 70s, and not too small, like some of the current miniature radios. The keypad, while not illuminated, is easy to read and the buttons are large enough for ease of pushing. (I found that I didnt miss the illuminated keypad.) The ON/OFF button, however, is curiously small, compared to the other buttons. A big VOLUME (and SET function selector) knob on top of the rig is easy to use, even with HAZMAT gloves on.
Table 1 ICOM IC-V80, serial number 25001171-9
Manufacturers Specifications

Frequency coverage: Receive, 136-174 MHz; transmit, 144-148 MHz. Modes: FM, NFM.

Measured in ARRL Lab

Receive and transmit, as specified. As specified.
Power requirements: 7.2 V dc (battery only) Receive, battery power, 266 mA (max receive, 310 mA (max audio, internal speaker), volume, no signal, lights on); 174 mA 180 mA (max audio, external speaker), (max vol, no signal, lights on, external 65 mA standby, 20 mA power save; speaker); 68 mA (standby, lights off), transmit, 1.4 A (high), 0.9 A (middle), 20 mA (power save on). 0.6 A (low). Transmit, 1.4 A (high), 0.95 A (middle), 0.5 A, (low) at 8.2 V dc (full charge). Receiver FM sensitivity: 12 dB SINAD, 0.14 V. FM two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range: Not specified. Receiver Dynamic Testing For 12 dB SINAD, 146 MHz, 0.16 V; 162.4 MHz, 0.14 V. 20 kHz offset: 65 dB; 10 MHz offset: 89 dB
FM two-tone, second-order IMD dynamic range: 146 MHz, 87 dB. Not specified. Adjacent-channel rejection: Not specified. Spurious response: Not specified. Squelch sensitivity: 0.1 V. Audio output: 0.75 W at 10% THD into 16 W (internal speaker), 0.45 W at 10% THD into 8 W (external speaker). Transmitter Power output: 5.5 W (high), 2.5 W (middle), 0.5 W (low). Spurious signal and harmonic suppression: >60 dB. Transmit-receive turnaround time (PTT release to 50% of full audio output): Not specified. Receive-transmit turnaround time (tx delay): Not specified. 20 kHz offset: 74 dB. IF rejection, 115 dB; image rejection, 78 dB. At threshold, 0.1 V; 0.27 V (max). 346 mW at 3.2% THD into 8 W (external speaker).* Transmitter Dynamic Testing 5.7 W (high), 2.5 W (middle), 0.5 W (low). at 8.2 V dc (full charge). >70 dB, meets FCC requirements. Squelch on, S9 signal, 300 ms. 134 ms.
Size (height, width, depth): 4.4 2.2 1.2 inches; weight, 12.4 ounces. Price: IC-V80, $120. OPC-478UC USB cable, $60; CS-V80 software, $50; HS-95 headset, $160 and OPC-2004 cable, $25.

BP-264

7.2 V, 1400 mAh NiMH battery and wall charger supplied. Available options: BP-265 7.4 V, 1900 mAh Li-ion battery, $70; BC-191 drop-in rapid charger for BP-264, $70; BC-193 drop-in rapid charger for BP-265, $70; BP-263 battery case for 6 AA cells, $30; OPC-515L dc power cable, $20. *Volume set to level 18. Maximum output is attainable, but exceeds 10% THD. The volume control changes in steps rather than continuously. Measurements with an 8 W load at the speaker jack: level 18, 346 mW at 3.2% THD; level 19, 435 mW at 14.5% THD; level 24, 480 mW at 22% THD. THD at 1.195 V RMS, 2%.
Plenty of Useful Features
There are 207 memory channels available, including 200 regular channels, six scan edges and one call channel. They are easy to program. The channel name is programmable with five characters for easy recognition likely handy in a disaster area with unfamiliar repeater frequencies. You could program a channel as ICP, for example, for Incident Command Post, or HBASE for Helibase under the Incident Command System nomenclature.

54 March 2011

Built-in CTCSS/DCS tone codes provide quiet standby and allow you to use tone access repeaters. The tone scan function detects the subaudible tone that is used for repeater access, also very useful in unfamiliar territory. The IC-V80 has an internal VOX (voice operated transmit) function for what ICOM calls convenient hands free operation with a compatible optional headset and plug adapter cable, but I did not test this option. The VOX gain and VOX delay time are adjustable. A large keypad button cycles among four settings: VFO/MR (memory recall)/CALL and, although not labeled, weather channel (10
channels), also handy for field deployments. There is also a weather alert function. The usual scan, program, memory, skip and priority functions are available, along with a power save function, time-out timer setting, repeater lockout and busy channel lockout. Its PC programmable with optional CS-V80 software, and transceiver-totransceiver cloning is also optional. Frequency selection is by direct keypad entry or the large UP and DOWN ARROW buttons. Other functions are provided including DTMF memory channels, auto power off, LCD backlight and wide/narrow channel spacing. I like the large display characters that are easy to read, even though my eyesight isnt
what it used to be. I like the fact that the unit is easy to use, simple with just the most basic functions, without superfluous functions that only a total techno-geek would use. It feels rock solid. The IC-V80 comes with a BC-192 dropin slow battery charger, which I liked, and a drop-in rapid charger is available. This charger can also run from 12 V dc, so you can charge the battery while operating in a vehicle.
A simple AA battery case is also available and would be extremely important in a disaster situations in which there is no power with which to charge batteries. All you would need to operate for days is a decent stock of AA alkaline batteries. The IC-V80 Sport model comes standard with the AA cell holder instead of a rechargeable battery and is available at a lower price. The audio quality reports I received from both repeater users and simplex op-
erators were all fine. Microphone gain can be changed in the SET MODE, along with a whole host of other adjustments that are standard on most other radios today. The ultimate litmus test for any review unit is whether or not the reviewer would buy one for him or herself. Not only would I consider buying one, I did. Manufacturer: ICOM America, 2380 116th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98004; tel 800-872-4266; www.icomamerica.com.

March 2011 55

doc1

ICOM IC-T70A Handheld Dual Band Transceiver
Reviewed by Rick Palm, K1CE ARRL Contributing Editor The IC-T70A is the dual band (2 meter and 70 cm) sister of the IC-V80. Physically it appears to be almost identical to the V80, but there are a few differences. The display window is taller, allowing for a better signal strength meter than the tiny meter on the V80. (I question the utility of having a signal strength meter at all on a handheld radio; Id rather have the space used for larger display characters). The dual band flexible antenna connector is the SMA screw-in type. A BNC adapter is available. For emcomm use, I recommend getting the optional AA battery holder case and a good supply of AA batteries, which will last a long time in the absence of commercial mains to charge the NiMH battery pack as discussed in the IC-V80 review. VOX (voice operated transmit) function as does the V80, but I did not test these functions. An optional headset and plug adapter cable are necessary. VOX level and VOX delay time are adjustable. The unit seems very rugged and falls under the same codes (IP54 and MIL-STD 810) as discussed in the IC-V80 review. Other features include a NOAA weather alert, power save function, a time out timer to save the transmitter, PC programmable with the optional cable and software, transceiver-to-transceiver cloning (also optional), 16 DTMF autodial memories, auto power off and an LCD backlight. If there is 70 cm activity in your area, the IC-T70A would be a good choice, although it is a bit more expensive with prices about $100 higher than the V80. The manuals for both radios are very good and easy to understand. After a 5 minute quick read, you are on the air. Manufacturer: ICOM America, 2380 116th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98004; tel 800-8724266; www.icomamerica.com.

Features and Functions

Functionality is also different from the V80: There is a concentric knob on top of the radio that allows selecting the operating frequency in both VFO and memory recall (MR) modes, SET mode selections, scanning direction, squelch level (while pushing the MONI squelch defeat button), and programmed memory bank. The outer knob is the VOLUME control and during SET mode operation, it is rotated to select the options. The keypad seems simpler to operate because there is no FUNCTION key to press prior to setting power levels and operating modes (VFO/MR/Call/WX). Instead, the operator merely holds the corresponding button down for one second to enter SET mode or change the band, start a scan or tone scan, or turn the subaudible tone on. The result is a cleaner look to the keypad and only one button to push versus the two steps required to change a mode on the IC-V80. I like it better than the V80s keypad. As with the V80, there is plenty of audio for outdoor use or operation in noisy locations. I ran the unit through the same tests described in the IC-V80 review with roughly the same results. The IC-T70A has 300 memory channels, and two call channels. Memory channels include scan edge channels, and 26 memory banks in each band for storing groups of frequencies. Up to six characters can be entered to give a memory, bank or scan, an alphanumeric name, as described in the discussion of the IC-V80. That is one more character available than with the V80. Nominal power output is 5 W on the HIGH power setting; 2.5 W on the MIDDLE level setting; and 0.5 W on the LOW power setting. All audio reports received from both repeater and simplex operators were fine. Mic gain is adjustable in the SET mode. The IC-T70A has an internal

Power Options

There is a dc input jack on the T70A, which is absent on the V80. Thus, a desktop drop-in charger is employed to charge the V80, while a regular (wall cube) charger is connected to the dc input jack of the T70A. It takes about 8 hours to charge the standard NiMH battery pack. An optional quickcharge desktop drop-in charger is available the BC-191. An optional Li-ion battery pack (BP-265) is available and requires the BC-193 desktop charger. A nice feature of the dc input jack is that the radio can be used with an external dc power supply with an optional adapter (OPC-254L). A cigarette lighter socket can also be used with another optional adapter. The standard battery pack (BP-264) is 7.2 V with a capacity of 1400 mAh. The Li-ion pack is 7.4 V with about 2000 mAh of capacity. ICOM claims about 10-12 hours of radio operation with the BP-264, depending on transmitter power output, of course. This is based on a ratio of 5% transmit time, 5% receive time, and 90% of standby time if the auto power save function is employed. The BP-265 offers a couple of hours more. A nice feature of the unit is that while the battery is being charged, CHARGE is seen in the display screen, and it disappears after the battery is fully charged. This eliminates the guessing game as to when the unit is charged. There is no such function for the IC-V80, although the charger has an LED to indicate charge status.

March 2011 55

Key Measurements Summary
0.10 0.12 0.1 86@10 MHz 78@10 MHz
Table 2 ICOM IC-T70A, serial number 05001097
Manufacturers Specifications
Frequency coverage: Receive, 136-174, 400- 479 MHz; transmit, 144-148, 420-450 MHz. Modes: FM, NFM.

Measured in ARRL Lab

Receive and transmit, as specified. As specified.

SINAD 0.25

Receiver Sensitivity (12dB SINAD, V)
Receiver 3rd-Order Dynamic Range (dB)
70@20 kHz* 69@20 kHz* 70 70
Power requirements: 7.2 V dc (battery) or Receive, battery power, 432 mA (max 10-16 V dc external supply; receive, 450 mA volume, no signal, lights on); 280 mA (max audio, internal speaker), 300 mA (max (max vol, no signal, lights on, external audio, external speaker), 90 mA (standby), speaker); 86 mA (standby, lights off), 40 mA (power save); transmit, VHF, 1.4 A (high), 42 mA (power save on). 1.2 A (middle), 0.6 A (low); UHF, 2.1 A (high), Transmit, battery power, VHF, 1.7 A 1.5 A (middle), 0.8 A (low). (high) 1.2 A (middle), 0.8 A, (low); UHF, 2.4/1.7/0.8 A at 8.2 V dc (full charge). External 13.8 V dc supply, VHF, 1.6/1.2/0.6 A; UHF, 2.2/1.7/0.8 A. Receiver FM sensitivity: 12 dB SINAD, 0.18 V. FM two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range: Not specified. Receiver Dynamic Testing For 12 dB SINAD, 146 MHz, 0.10 V; 162.4 MHz, 0.14 V, 440 MHz, 0.12 V. 20 kHz offset: 146 MHz, 70 dB*; 440 MHz, 69 dB*; 10 MHz offset; 146 MHz, 86 dB, 440 MHz, 78 dB. 146 MHz, 86 dB, 440 MHz, 118 dB. 20 kHz offset: 146 MHz, 70 dB, 440 MHz, 69 dB. IF rejection, 146 MHz, 92 dB; 440 MHz, 118 dB. Image rejection, 146 MHz, 88 dB; 440 MHz, >136 dB. At threshold, 146 & 440 MHz, 0.38 V, 0.11 V (auto), 1.22 V (max). 395 mW at 10% THD into 8 W (external speaker); THD at 1 V RMS, 1.5%. Transmitter Dynamic Testing Battery (8.2 V) or ext 13.8 V dc power: VHF, 5.2/2.5/0.5 W; UHF, 4.6/2.3/0.4 W >70 dB, meets FCC requirements. Squelch on, S9 signal, 146 MHz, 214 ms, 440 MHz, 210 ms. 146 MHz, 196 ms; 440 MHz, 194 ms.

ChRej 50

Adjacent Channel Rejection (dB)

118** 110

FM two-tone, second-order IMD dynamic range: Not specified. Adjacent-channel rejection: Not specified. Spurious response: Not specified. Squelch sensitivity: 0.18 V.

IF Rejection (dB)

88 136** 110

Img 60

Image Rejection (dB)
Audio output: >700 mW at 10% THD into 16 W (internal speaker), >400 mW at 10% THD into 8 W (external speaker). Transmitter Power output: 5.0 W (high), 2.5 W (middle), 0.5 W (low). Spurious signal and harmonic suppression: >60 dB.

Snd 100

Audio Output (mW)

214 210

Tx-Rx Turnaround Time (ms)

T-R 250

50 2M 70 cm
Transmit-receive turnaround time (PTT release to 50% of full audio output): Not specified. Receive-transmit turnaround time (tx delay): Not specified.
Size (height, width, depth): 4.4 2.3 1.2 inches; weight, 13.4 ounces. Price: IC-T70A, $225. OPC-478UC USB cable, $60; CS-T70 software, $50; HS-95 headset, $160 and OPC-2006 cable, $25. *Measurement was noise limited at the value indicated. BP-264 7.2 V, 1400 mAh NiMH battery and wall charger supplied. Available options: BP-265 7.4 V, 1900 mAh Li-ion battery, $70; BC-191 drop-in rapid charger for BP-264, $70; BC-193 drop-in rapid charger for BP-265, $70; BP-263 battery case for 6 AA cells, $30; OPC-515L dc power cable, $20.
**Off Scale * Measurement noise limited

at value shown.

Bottom Line
The IC-T70A is a solid dual band handheld transceiver that includes a wide range of features yet is easy to operate.

56 March 2011

 

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