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Comments to date: 10. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
NaturalGay 1:03am on Wednesday, September 15th, 2010 
For this great price, not bad So I ordered these on Monday, early morning and after the item was finally shipped.
atd 11:04am on Thursday, September 2nd, 2010 
The only issue that I have found is that the rubber ear buds can compress at times - I simply pull them back out, but it can be anoying at times.
JFGN 9:57pm on Tuesday, August 31st, 2010 
Very good....when they work! Bought my 2nd pair of these in February. Great value, and a decent sound... Headphones Arrived quickly. Earphones work very well but no good if your lug holes are smaller than the average person.
talun 10:17pm on Wednesday, August 25th, 2010 
Creative EP-830 Noise Isolating Earphones Very disappointed with these earphones, i bought them off the back of very good reviews i had read.
tehuan 1:38am on Monday, August 16th, 2010 
I must be a compulsive headphone buyer. I have a lot of headphones at home, most inexpensive and not all are being used.
tuerto 1:25pm on Sunday, August 15th, 2010 
"Well, after using fm mods i decided that it was time to move on and buy something else. i had 2 choices 1. "This is my 3rd tape adapter for my iPod - first was Monster Cable, then Dynex (?) - which was the worst, and now this Sony one. "This sony cassette player with the attached ipod wire works really well. It is also easy to use.
sxnahm 4:50pm on Monday, June 14th, 2010 
Not only do I like bacon, but I love the way it smells when it is cooking Inexpensive, but sound great The wire is a little thin. Not a big deal. i used egg saver and got it in 4 days....not that bad as i thought it would be 1. good bass ; 2. crisp sound ; 3.
butters64 1:22pm on Sunday, May 30th, 2010 
Amazing Creative EP-630 In-Ear Noise-Isolating Headphones (Black) I got a pair of these when I ordered my XPS computer system back in 2008. Small price for big sound For $16.00, what can you say! I was quite pleased with the sound for such a small price.
Rajeev 5:41am on Saturday, May 22nd, 2010 
Placement of the headset in the ear of the Creative EP630 with coverage from rubber provide a fantastic experience audio in MP3 format.
natvlegl 2:16am on Thursday, April 8th, 2010 
Sound quality??? After reading other review I am extremely surprised at what I am listening to.

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

doc0

Product Review Column from QST Magazine
July 1999 ICOM IC-706MKIIG HF/VHF/UHF Transceiver The AOR AR7000B Wide Range Communications Receiver
Copyright 1999 by the American Radio Relay League Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Review

Edited by Joe Bottiglieri, AA1GW Assistant Technical Editor
ICOM IC-706MKIIG HF/VHF/UHF Transceiver
By Rick Lindquist, N1RL Senior News Editor Recently I was scanning the automobile adsa vain exercise in wishful thinking when I spotted a writeup for the latest model of my current vehicle. Some of the features of the 1999 model were exactly the ones Id often wished my car possessed. My vehicle was the first of its line, however. This got me thinking about the time I bought my first 2-meter all-mode transceiver back when I was active on the satellites. It was a fine little transceiver, and I only recently parted company with it. But I never quite got over the fact that not six months after Id bought my latest and greatest radio, the manufacturer came out with a new and improved version that incorporated all the features Id come to wish that my rig had. By now it should come as no surprise that I own an original IC-706 transceiver. We original owners have become greener with envy with each incarnation of the IC-706 line. Some have happily traded up. Since the original debuted in 1995 to the oohs and aahs of the Amateur Radio community, ICOM has continued to up the ante (but not the price) almost each succeeding year, almost like model years in the auto industry. But while the Amateur Radio industry is not like the auto industry, ICOM has distinguished itself in recent years by trumping its own aces and by correcting in subsequent models shortcomings that we have revealed during the course of our product reviews. Getting yet another look at this hugely popular model gave us the opportunity to dig a bit more deeply into the basic unit, and to see how the various enhancements over the subsequent two models have made the IC-706 a better radio. So, it is trade-in time again? Lets see what the IC-706MKIIG brings to the table.

Whats New, Pussycat?

The primary new features of the MKIIG are the addition of the 70-cm band, the inclusion of DSP, and more power50 Won 2 meters (history buffs will recall the original 706 put out 10 W on 2, the MKII 20 W). Yes, there are some other features that some users will consider significant or important, but for most folks, these are the big three. Well get to the others in due course. They are largely incremental improvements, however. DSP was an approximately $150 option in the initial MKII. Now, its standard. If for nothing other than competitive reasons, this was a wise move on ICOMs part. We
recently praised the Yaesu FT-100 for having superb DSP featuresincluding the ability to digitally tailor your transmit audio on SSBsomething you wont find on the MKIIG. The DSP features on the IC-706MKIIG are not quite as rich, but they are competent as far as they go. The DSP menu offers two primary features: noise reduction and an autonotch filter to zap heterodynes while operating SSB. The IC-706MKIIG lets you adjust the level of noise reduction you prefer. While overall noise reduction was measured in the vicinity of 10 dB, as with the FT-100 we found a bit of rolloff at the high end plus a substantial amount of frequency ripple. With the NR cranked up full tilt boogie on SSB, the digital processing noise becomes much more apparenteven annoying at times. But, it might very well be far less

Bottom Line

With the addition of yet another band (70 cm), more power on 2 meters and the incremental improvements made with each new version of this popular transceiver, perhaps the 706 has reached its zenith. Theres not much left to improve.
annoying than the noise youre trying to reduce, so its one of those trade-offs. One characteristic where the DSP in the 706 excels is the autonotch. Lab measurements revealed a notch depth for a single tone at greater than 50 dB. This is considerably better than the 20 dB notch depth on the FT-100. Something new for FM-lovers: The MKIIG lets you set the automatic splits for repeater operation for HF, 50, 144 and 430 MHz, a real plus for repeater users. These settings are part of the initial set mode menu. This split is the one youll get when you press the DUP button in FM mode. The IC-706MKIIG knows the split direction too, depending upon the band segment. The MKIIG also includes tone scan capabilitysomething thats optional in the nearest competitor, the FT-100. The Instruction Manual is a little unclear about this, but you have to be in repeater mode and have TON enabled. The SWR Graph mode is a new and potentially useful feature that generates a little graphic representation of your SWR over a selectable range of HF or 6-meter frequencies. The menu lets you set the number of sample points to graph (3, 5, 7 or 9) and the step size between each point (10, 50, 100 or 500 kHz). The resulting graph is a set of vertical bars. The number of bars correFrom July 199 QST ARRL

Table 1 ICOM IC-706MKIIG, serial number 01674
Manufacturers Claimed Specifications Frequency coverage: Receive, 0.03-200, 400-470 MHz; transmit, 1.8-2, 3.5-4, 7-7.3, 10.1-10.15, 14-14.35, 18.068-18.168, 21-21.45, 24.89-24.99, 28-29.7, 50-54, 144-148, 430-450 MHz. Power requirement: Receive, 2.0 A; transmit, 20 A. Modes of operation: SSB, CW, AM, FM, AFSK, WFM (WFM receive only). Receiver SSB/CW sensitivity, bandwidth not specified, 10 dB S/N: 1.8-30 MHz, <0.15 V; 50-54 MHz, <0.12 V; 144-148, 430-450 MHz, <0.11 V. Measured in the ARRL Lab Receive, as specified; transmit 1.8-2, 3.5-4.1, 6.9-7.5, 9.9-10.5, 13.9-14.5, 17.9-18.5, 20.9-21.5, 24.4-25.1, 28-30, 50-54, 144-148, 430-450 MHz.
Receive, 1.4 A; transmit, 21 A. Tested at 13.8 V. As specified.
AM sensitivity, 10 dB S/N: 0.3-1.8 MHz, <13 V; 1.8-30 MHz, <2 V; 50-54,144-148, 430-450 MHz, <1 V.
FM sensitivity, 12 dB SINAD: 28-30 MHz, <0.5 V; 50-54 MHz, <0.25 V; 144-148, 430-450 MHz, <0.18 V.
Blocking dynamic range: Not specified.
Two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range: Not specified.
Third-order intercept: Not specified.
Second-order intercept: Not specified.
Receiver Dynamic Testing Noise floor (mds), 500-Hz filter: Preamp off Preamp on 1.0 MHz 124 dBm 130 dBm 3.5 MHz 137 dBm 142 dBm 14 MHz 136 dBm 142 dBm 50 MHz 139 dBm 142 dBm 144 MHz 138 dBm 142 dBm 432 MHz 138 dBm 143 dBm 10 dB (S+N)/N, 1-kHz tone, 30% modulation: Preamp off Preamp on 1.0 MHz 3.3 V 1.7 V 3.8 MHz 0.68 V 0.44 V 50 MHz 0.25 V 0.21 V 120 MHz 0.91 V 0.39 V 144 MHz 0.68 V 0.39 V 432 MHz 0.67 V 0.37 V For 12 dB SINAD: Preamp off Preamp on 29 MHz 0.39 V 0.20 V 52 MHz 0.25 V 0.17 V 146 MHz 0.29 V 0.16 V 440 MHz 0.29 V 0.16 V Blocking dynamic range, 500-Hz filter: Preamp off Preamp on 3.5 MHz 125 dB 118 dB 14 MHz 122 dB* 120 dB* 50 MHz 116 dB* 112 dB* 144 MHz 111 dB* 101 dB* 432 MHz 109 dB* 106 dB* Two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range, 500-Hz filter: Preamp off Preamp on 3.5 MHz 89 dB 87 dB 14 MHz 89 dB 86 dB 50 MHz 89 dB 82 dB 144 MHz 88 dB* 83 dB 432 MHz 85 dB 82 dB Preamp off Preamp on 3.5 MHz 3.4 dBm 13 dBm 14 MHz 1.3 dBm 11 dBm 50 MHz 4.9 dBm 15 dBm 144 MHz 3.0 dBm 16 dBm 432 MHz 8.7 dBm 18 dBm Preamp off, +36.4 dBm; preamp on, +38.5 dBm.

Reference Level: 0 dB PEP

4 Frequency Offset (kHz)

Figure 1Worst-case HF spectral display of the IC-706MKIIG transmitter during twotone intermodulation distortion (IMD) testing. The worst-case third-order product is approximately 30 dB below PEP output, and the worst-case fifth-order product is down approximately 33 dB. The transceiver was being operated at 100 W PEP output at 21.25 MHz.
Figure 2Worst-case VHF/UHF spectral display of the IC-706MKIIG transmitter during two-tone intermodulation distortion (IMD) testing. The worst-case third-order product is approximately 25 dB below PEP output, and the worst-case fifth-order product is down approximately 40 dB. The transceiver was being operated at 50 W PEP output at 144.2 MHz.
Figure 3CW keying waveform for the IC-706MKIIG showing the first two dits in fullbreak-in (QSK) mode using external keying. Equivalent keying speed is approximately 60 wpm. The upper trace is the actual key closure; the lower trace is the RF envelope. Horizontal divisions are 10 ms. The transceiver was being operated at 100 W output at 14.2 MHz. Note the considerable shortening of both dits.

From July 199 QST ARRL

Manufacturers Claimed Specifications
FM adjacent channel rejection: Not specified. FM two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range: Not specified.

Measured in the ARRL Lab

20 kHz channel spacing, preamp on: 29 MHz, 66 dB; 52 MHz, 64 dB; 146 MHz, 70 dB; 440 MHz, 71 dB. 20 kHz channel spacing, preamp on: 29 MHz, 66 dB*; 52 MHz, 64 dB*; 146 MHz, 70 dB*; 440 MHz, 75 dB; 10 MHz channel spacing, preamp on: 52 MHz, 91 dB; 146 MHz, 78 dB; 440 MHz, 80 dB. S9 signal at 14.2 MHz: preamp off, 34 V; preamp on, 11 V; 52 MHz, preamp off, 14 V; preamp on, 6.6 V; 146 MHz, preamp off, 18 V, preamp on, 4.1 V; 432 MHz, preamp off, 17 V, preamp on, 5.7 V. At threshold, preamp on: SSB, 14 MHz, 1.4 V; FM, 29 MHz, 0.11 V; 52 MHz, 0.06 V; 146 MHz, 0.06 V; 440 MHz, 0.06 V. 2.1 W at 10% THD into 8. Range at -6dB points, (bandwidth): CW-N (500 Hz filter): 200-1000 Hz (800 Hz); CW-W: 182-3077 Hz (2895 Hz); USB-W: 182-3077 Hz (2895 Hz); LSB-W: 182-2667 Hz (2485 Hz); AM: 275-2860 Hz (2585 Hz). First IF rejection, 14 MHz, 120 dB; 50 MHz, 54 dB; 144 MHz, 64 dB; 432 MHz, 108 dB; image rejection,14 MHz, 112 dB; 50 MHz, 121 dB; 144 MHz, 71 dB; 432 MHz, 80 dB.
S-meter sensitivity: Not specified.
Squelch sensitivity: SSB, <5.6 V; FM, <0.3 V. Receiver audio output: 2.0 W at 10% THD into 8. IF/audio response: Not specified.
Spurious and image rejection: 1.8-30 MHz, 70 dB; 50-54 MHz, image rejection, 65 dB, IF rejection unspecified; 144-148, 430-450 MHz, IF and image rejection, 65 dB.
Transmitter Power output: HF & 50 MHz: SSB, CW, FM, 100 W AM, 40 W (high); 144 MHz, 50 W (high); AM, 20 W (high); 430 MHz, 20 W (high); AM, 8 W (high).

Transmitter Dynamic Testing HF & 50 MHz: CW, SSB, FM, typically 103 W high, <1 W low; AM typically 29 W high, <1 W low; 144 MHz: CW, SSB, FM, typically 53 W high, <1 W low; AM, typically 19 W high, <1 W low; 430 MHz: CW, SSB, FM, typically 20 W high, <1 W low; AM, typically 6 W high, <1 W low. Spurious-signal and harmonic suppression: 50 dB HF, 53 dB; 50 MHz, 67 dB; 144 MHz, 61 dB; 430 MHz, 68 dB. on HF; 60 dB on VHF & UHF. Meets FCC requirements for spectral purity. SSB carrier suppression: 40 dB. As specified. >59 dB. Expanded Product Review Report Available Undesired sideband suppression: 50 dB. As specified. >64 dB. The ARRL Laboratory offers a detailed test result report on the ICOM IC-706MKIIG that gives Third-order intermodulation distortion (IMD) products: Not specified. See Figure 1. in-depth, technical data on the transceivers perforCW keyer speed range: Not specified. 6 to 50 WPM. mance. Request the IC-706MKIIG Test Result ReCW keying characteristics: Not specified. See Figure 3. port from the ARRL Technical Department, 860594-0278; e-mail mlevesque@arrl.org. Members Transmit-receive turn-around time (PTT release to 50% S9 signal, 21 ms. can see this on-line on our Members Only Web site. audio output): Not specified. Receive-transmit turn-around time (tx delay): Not specified. SSB, 20 ms; FM, 210 ms. Unit is suitable for use on AMTOR. Composite transmitted noise: Not specified. See Figures 4 and 5. Bit-error rate (BER), 9600-baud: Not specified. 146 MHz: Receiver: BER at 12-dB SINAD, 2.2103; BER at 16 dB SINAD, 4.6105; BER at 50 dBm, <1.0105; transmitter: BER at 12-dB SINAD, 4.6103; BER at 12-dB SINAD + 30 dB, 2.1104. 440 MHz: Receiver: BER at 12-dB SINAD, 2.3103; BER at 16 dB SINAD, 8.4105; BER at 50 dBm, <1.0105; transmitter: BER at 12-dB SINAD, 2.8103; BER at 12-dB SINAD + 30 dB, 1.9104. Size (HWD): 2.36.67.9 inches; weight, 5.4 pounds.
Note: Unless otherwise noted, all dynamic range measurements are taken at the ARRL Lab standard spacing of 20 kHz. *Measurement was noise-limited at the value indicated. Third-order intercept points were determined using S5 reference.

Reference Level: - 60 dBc/Hz Vertical Scale: dBc/Hz
sponds to the number of sample points, the height of each bar indicates the SWR at that point. This is a very neat featureespecially if youre trying to figure out where your antenna system is going wrong.

What Got Better?

One of the nice little touches on this transceiver is how the IF bandwidth icon pops up in the menu keys area as soon as you touch the IF SHIFT knob. The bandwidth narrows appropriately if you switch in a narrow filter too. Another nice touch is the backlighted buttons. Even the P.AMP/ATT, RIT/SUB and TUNER/CALL buttons are visible in darkness. When not activated, they emit a dull, orange glow. An annoying and potentially damaging problem that wed spotted in the earlier models in the IC-706 line appears to have been eliminated for the most part in the MKIIG. In From July 199 QST ARRL
Frequency Sweep: 2 to 22 kHz from Carrier
Figure 4Worst-case HF spectral display of the IC-706MKIIG transmitter output during composite-noise testing. Power output is 100 W at 14.02 MHz. The carrier, off the left edge of the plot, is not shown. This plot shows composite transmitted noise 2 to 22 kHz from the carrier.
Figure 5Worst-case VHF/UHF spectral display of the IC-706MKIIG transmitter output during composite-noise testing. Power output is 20 W at 432.02 MHz. The carrier, off the left edge of the plot, is not shown. This plot shows composite transmitted noise 2 to 22 kHz from the carrier.
the earlier incarnations, if you cut back the powersay to match the required input for an amplifierthe transmitter still would put out a very brief spike of up to full output power when the transmitter was first keyed that lasted until the ALC took hold and reined in the output to the desired level. Some users reported that amplifiers sometimes would kick off as a result. ICOM apparently was listening. The leading-edge spike on the MKIIG is much less prominent and should not cause the same sorts of problems.
The IC-706MKIIG continues the worthy tradition of being an easy-to-use and (almost as important) easy-to-mount subcompact radio. As with all the previous 706s, this versions control buttons and knobs are logically positioned and adequately spaced and sized for convenient operation. The tuning speed automatically increases with faster knob rotation and a well-designed knob spinner and a drag adjustment lever is provided. The built-in speaker in the last two iterations actually sounds pretty decent. The thermostatic control for the cooling fan, also added with the MKII model, was a welcome improvementespecially for fixed-station operation. ICOM offers a nice selection of optional IF filters. Two slots are available (up from one in the original 706), and the plug-in sockets make the filters easy to install or swap out. Unlike the competition, the radios in the 706 series only require a single quick-release separation cable for remote mounting of the control head. The head includes a connection point for the mike, and a switch on the back of the front panel allows you to use the phones jack for either headphones or an external speaker. This is a real convenience if you intend to use the radio in multiple applications. Two notable weak points present in both of the earlier units, unfortunately, have also remained unchanged in the G. From the advent of the IC-706 series, one of the things wed complained about was fact that turning on the noise blanker can impart a lot of crackling artifacts, especially on a busy band or in the presence of nearby strong signals. Yes, it does work to eliminate pulse noiseI checked it out on the engine noise of passing vessels while operating marine mobile one weekend, and it worked just fine. Only when the band started to fill up a bit later did I start hearing the characteristic crackling noiseand realize Id left the NB on. The AGC is another thing thats the same across the entire model line. It can be fast or slow (no display indication means its in the slow mode), but not off. For my tastes, the fast AGC is too fast for comfortable SSB listening, and I wasnt crazy about it for CW either. My tendency was to leave the AGC in the slow mode at all times. The AGC is accessible via the main menu.

Multiple Menus

First-time users of the IC-706MKIIG (or From July 199 QST ARRL
of any of the 706 lineage, for that matter) will encounter a bit of a learning curve getting used to all the menus. The IC-706MKIIG has not one, not two, but four menus; unfortunately, the Instruction Manual does not cover all of them in the same place. Lets take a look at the layers of menus. First, theres the M menua primary menu set that includes four sets of three choices apiece. These have not changed from the previous model. Successive quick presses of the DISP button get you to the S menu and the G menu. The S menu includes the Memo Pad, the Scan Func, the B.S.R. (bandstacking registers), and the D.S.P. functions. The G menu includes the Band Scope, an SWR Graph mode, a TX Freq readout mode, and a Memory Name mode. But wait, theres more: press and hold the DISP button and you get to the Q or Quick Set menu, which sets a variety of mode-related functions in addition to power output. There are some changes in this menu set, owing to the fact that ICOM has shifted some settings that were manual adjustments on the MKII are now menu adjustments on the MKIIG. The VOX GAIN and ANTI VOX used to be little trimpot adjustments on the side of the transceiver. Putting them into the Quick Set menu is a giant step toward greater convenience. The only trimpots on the side of the radio now are COMPression GAIN and the BEEP/SIDE Tone adjustments. To top it all off, the 706 series provides whats called an Initial Set menu. The Initial Set menu in the MKIIG contains 37 choices as opposed to 28 in the MKII, so there are some changes in the Initial Set menu from the previous model. One possibly convenient settingits the first one in this set of adjustmentsis called Mode Select. It lets you inhibit the selection of unneeded modes. This eliminates the admittedly minor annoyance of having to step through, say, RTTY, when switching modes when you have no intention of operating RTTY. Since the buttons now are backlighted on the MKIIG, the Initial Set menu provides a way to set the backlighting at either the HI or LO brightness level. The MKIIG is 9600 bps capable; you set the packet speed1200 bps or 9600 bps via the Initial Set menu. In the 9600 bps setting, the signal from the TNC passes through an internal limiter to maintain bandwidth. This brings up another new item from the previous model. The MKIIG has a new 6-pin mini-DIN DATA jack on the rear apron for packet connections to a TNC for either 1200 bps or 9600 bps operation. Something thats really handy for FM repeater ops is that the Initial Set menu on the MKIIG also lets you select a DUP offset9.999 MHzto set the standard repeater split on HF, 50, 144 and 430 MHz. You still can set a standard split that you then can retrieve at the push of a menu function button. Once enabled via the Initial Set menu, the DUP offset makes available the onetouch repeater function. As it suggests, it

allows you to set repeater operation with the push of one switch. Something new on the MKIIG, the auto repeater function, also is enabled via the Initial Set menu. This automatically activates the repeater settings (duplex direction and tone encoder on or off) when the operating frequency is within a repeater subband. This means, for example, that the duplex direction automatically will be + if youre in the 147 MHz range of 2 meters and within the repeater subband. The upside of the individual menus is that not all items are in one big menu and, as a result, are more accessible. The downside is that all menu items are not in one big menu. It can be difficult to remember which menu function is where, and the groupings are not always intuitive. In addition to other information, the convenient Operating Guide that accompanies the manual includes a Menu Switch Flow Chart that certainly is a step in the right direction to simplifying matters.

Lets do the Numbers

In performance terms, did anything important change between the MKII and the MKIIG? SSB and CW sensitivity numbers are about the same across the boardHF and VHF. The 70-cm band falls into the same ballpark as well. Blocking dynamic range was slightly betteras much as 12 dB better and not noise-limited on 3.5 MHz this time. Two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range measurements were ever so slightly better than the previous modeland only noise-limited on 144 MHz this time, not on all bands. There was one difference. On the MKII we looked at early last year, thirdorder intercept had been in the positive numbers (preamp off) on 3.5 and 14 MHz. All third-order intercept numbers were negative on our MKIIG. AM sensitivity appeared to be significantly improved on the MKIIG we tested. On 3.5 MHz, it went from 1.0 V to 0.68 V. In the aircraft band, it went from 2.0 V to 0.91 V. FM sensitivity numbers between the MKII and the MKIIG were comparable on 50 and 144 MHz and slightly better on 10 meters.

CW Keying

In the two earlier IC-706 models, wed noted some limitations on the CW keying, especially when transmitting at speeds in excess of around 30 WPM using full-break-in, with or without the internal CW keyer. Our Lab measurements (see Figure 3) backed up the on-air reports wed received of clipped characters. Dits were all shortened with highspeed keying. In the semi-break-in mode, only the first dit was shortened. The on-air reports I received from my CW connoisseurs on 40 meters were not especially flattering of the IC-706MKIIG while using full-break-in and the internal keyer at or above 30 WPM or so. By the way, the IC-706MKIIG menu reads out CW
sending speed using the actual number (or a rough approximation) of words per minute. On the FT-100, you have to guess, since the number is only a relative indicator of sending speed.

Compared to the Competition
The IC-706MKIIG seemed to appear in response to the Yaesu FT-100, the first radio of the subcompact genre to offer the 70cm band and announced at Dayton Hamvention 1998. Their features and street prices are similar, but there are some differences that go beyond the merely cosmetic. Whether these will matter to you depends a lot on how you plan to use the radio. Wed strongly suggest you take a close look at the product review for the Yaesu FT-100 (see
Product Review, QST, Jun 1999) as well as our earlier reviews of the IC-706 (see Product Review, QST, Mar 1996) and the IC-706MKII (see Product Review, QST, Jan 1998). Pay especially close attention to the numbers in the respective technical data tables from our ARRL Lab testing. Some of the things we like on the IC-706MKII side: a single remoting cable that snaps to the faceplate and to the radio body; dual microphone connections; bulkhead-type SO-239 antenna jacks; and a relatively quiet cooling fan.

The Final Chapter?

Overall, this latest IC-706 incarnation is a competent transceiver for mobile or portable operation. The incremental improve-
ments in this version give rise to speculation that, with the MKIIG, ICOM has written the final chapter in this line of little transceivers. Theres not much left to improve. Manufacturer: ICOM America, 2380 116th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98004, tel 425454-8155; fax: 425-454-1509; http://www. icomamerica.com. Manufacturers suggested retail price: IC-706MKIIG, $1680. Typical current street price, $1390. MB-62 mobile mounting bracket, $25; OPC-581 separation kit, $60; MB-63 front panel mounting bracket, $18; FL-100 500-Hz CW filter, $133; FL-101 270-Hz CW filter, $133; FL-103 2.8-kHz SSB filter, $123; FL-223 1.9-kHz narrow SSB filter, $105; FL-232 350-Hz RTTY/CW filter, $113; CR-502 high-stability crystal unit, $95; UT-102 voice synthesizer, $74.
The AOR AR7000B Wide Range Communications Receiver
Reviewed by Joe Bottiglieri, AA1GW Assistant Technical Editor Of all the advances that weve seen in communications equipment over the last few decades, perhaps the most noticeable changes are in control and display technology. The AOR AR7000B wide range scanning receiver uses a 3.1-inch diagonally measured rectangular color LCD display similar to those used in handheld television receiversto provide a new level of flexibility in alphanumeric text and graphics display. All front panel controls, with the exception of the main tuning dial, are push buttons. An infrared remote control is included, and allows duplicate control of nearly all of the front panel operations. While the bright, busy, colorful display is certainly the first aspect of this unit that catches the eye, this receiver also sports an extensive list of capabilities and features that should attract the attention of those whose radio listening interests might range nearly anywhere between dc and daylight. (OK, so Im exaggerating a bit100 kHz to 2000 MHz, cellular blocked, of course.) Modes include WFM, FM, AM, CW, USB and LSB.

Getting Started

The programming scheme used in this radio is really quite uniquefor a communications receiver that is If your VCR has been flashing 12:00 PM since the day you plugged it in, perhaps this is not the radio for you. Several different menus and submenus are used to configure general operating parameters; to set the clocks and timers; to program the individual memories; to assign frequency limits for searches; to set upper and lower memory positions for programmed scans and to input alphanumeric tags. These appear on the screen in much the same format as the programming menus on most current VCRs and television sets. Each menu screen contains a list of related settings move a cursor to the setting you wish to change and press the ENT er key. This gives
you access to a submenu, or puts you in position to input digits with the keypad. Some settingsmode and bandwidth for examplerequire stepping through a group of choices with the main tuning knob or the + and buttons on the remote. Once you get a feel for it, its really quite simple. The receiver includes two separate VFOs and a memory mode. 100 channels in 15 banks provide plenty of storage for your favorite frequencies. Alphanumeric tagging, up to 7 characters (practically a necessity with 1,500 memories), lets you easily keep track of your stored information. Each memory/bank location retains the frequency, the memory name, the AGC setting, the mode and the IF bandwidth settingsand displays them all simultaneously (see Figure 6). After tuning around a bit and catching some action in the VFO mode, it wont be long before youll want to try programming
a few frequencies into the memories. Press and hold the EDIT/. key on the front panel to bring up the Memory Function menu (see Figure 7). Here youll find menu items that let you edit or delete memoriesor copy, move or swap memory information. The memory menu is only accessible using the front panel mounted EDIT/. key. This key is not included on the remote.

Search and Scan

In addition to the typical scan and search operations, the 7000B also includes eight search and eight scan memories. Press and hold the SEARCH/8 button and the Program Search menus appear. You use the main tuning dial or the + and TUNE buttons on the remote to move between the search memories. You can program into each a search name (40 Mtrs for example), stop and start frequencies, scan direction, tuning step size, mode, bandwidth and scan pause duration. Hit the RUN/BRK key and a band scope display appears (see Figure 8). The receiver then searches the range, graphically displaying the relative signal strength and pausing on active frequencies. Theres even a setting that can automatically store up to 100 active frequencies into your choice of memory banks. From July 199 QST ARRL

A combination of cutting-edge display technology and impressive spectrum agility make the AR7000B an attractive and versatile tool for the widerange communications enthusiast.
Table 2 AOR AR7000B, serial number 050011 Manufacturers Claimed Specifications Frequency coverage: Receive, 0.1-2000 MHz (cell blocked). Power requirement: Receive, 1.5 A;
Receiver SSB/CW sensitivity, bandwidth not specified, 10 dB S/N: 0.1-0.7 MHz, <1.6 V; 0.7-20 MHz, <1.5 V;20-1200 MHz,. <0.5 V; 1200-2000 MHz, <2.0 V
Measured in the ARRL Lab As specified.
Receive, 1.2 A. Tested at 13.8 V.
Modes of operation: SSB, CW, AM, FM, WFM. As specified.
AM sensitivity, 10 dB S/N: 0.1-0.7 MHz, <4.2 V; 0.7-20 MHz, <3.5 V; 20-1200 MHz, <1.3 V; 1200-2000 MHz, <4.0 V.
FM sensitivity, 12 dB SINAD: 0.1-0.7 MHz, <4.0 V; 0.7-20 MHz, <2.0 V; 20-1200 MHz, <0.56 V; 1200-2000 MHz, <1.6 V.
Second-order intercept: Not specified. FM adjacent channel rejection: Not specified. FM two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range: Not specified.
S-meter sensitivity: Not specified. Squelch sensitivity: Not specified. Receiver audio output: 1.0 W at 10% THD into 8. IF/audio response: Not specified.
Receiver Dynamic Testing Noise floor (mds), 500 Hz filter: 1.0 MHz 127 dBm 3.5 MHz 129 dBm 14 MHz 131 dBm 50 MHz 137 dBm 144 MHz 135 dBm 432 MHz 140 dBm 10 dB (S+N)/N, 1-kHz tone, 30% modulation: 1.0 MHz 3.67 V 3.8 MHz 3.16 V 50 MHz 1.23 V 120 MHz 1.33 V 144 MHz 1.88 V 432 MHz 0.676 V For 12 dB SINAD (15 kHz bandwidth): 29 MHz 0.305 V 52 MHz 0.489 V 100 MHz 0.489 V 146 MHz 0.402 V 223 MHz 0.320 V 440 MHz 0.214 V 902 MHz 0.335 V 1270 MHz 0.421 V Blocking dynamic range, 500-Hz filter: 3.5 MHz 95 dB 14 MHz 98 dB 50 MHz 69 dB 144 MHz 67 dB 432 MHz 69 dB Two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range, 500-Hz filter: 3.5 MHz 78 dB 14 MHz 78 dB 50 MHz 80 dB* 144 MHz 102 dB* 432 MHz 98 dB 3.5 MHz 12 dBm 14 dBm 14 MHz 50 MHz 17 dBm 144 MHz +18 dBm 432 MHz +7.0 dBm +51.4 dBm. 20 kHz channel spacing: 29 MHz, 44 dB; 52 MHz, 43 dB; 146 MHz, 46 dB; 440 MHz, 36 dB. 20 kHz channel spacing: 29 MHz, 44 dB*; 52 MHz, 43 dB*; 146 MHz, 46 dB*; 440 MHz, 36 dB*; 10 MHz channel spacing: 52 MHz, 73 dB; 146 MHz, 91 dB; 440 MHz, 63 dB. S9 signal 1 at 14.2 MHz: 242 V; 146 MHz, 237 V. At threshold: SSB, 14 MHz, 2.5 V; FM, 29 MHz, 0.45 V; 52 MHz, 1.0 V; 146 MHz, 0.71 V; 440 MHz, 0.35 V. 0.8 W at 10% THD into 8.

Note: Unless otherwise noted, all dynamic range measurements are taken at the ARRL Lab standard spacing of 20 kHz. *Measurement was noise-limited at the value indicated. Third-order intercept points were determined using noise-floor reference. 1S-meter is color based, so S9 figures were taken at the maximum limit of the green region. 2The image rejection for these frequencies is outside of the ARRL Labs measurement capabilities.
Figure 6The display screen of the AR7000B showing the contents of memory channel 2 of bank 1. Graphic representations of the signal strength and volume level appear at the top of the screen. The selected squelch level is indicated in S units.
Figure 7Most programming operations are carried out using a system of menus does this arrangement look familiar?
Figure 8The AR7000B band scope in the search mode. The band limits, search name (40 Mtrs in this example), mode, step size, bandwidth, sweep direction and pause duration can all be varied in a setup menu.
on the remote or the front panel cycles you through the selections. Five receiver on/off timers are also available. These are programmable for both the time and date. Use these in conjunction with the squelch activated relay control and the fixed level audio output (accessible from the 8-pin auxiliary jack), and you can set up a tape recorder to capture scheduled communications. You could also use these timers and the audio/video outputs to tape with your VCRjust program identical stop/start times into both units.

Back to the Shack

The AR7000B is a triple conversion superhet with digital signal processing applied at the 10.7 MHz IF. This allows a wide range of DSP-based selectable filter bandwidths and an IF shift featureboth very handy for fighting off nearby interference. Fast and slow AGC settings are available, and theres a 10 dB attenuator included as well. Tuning around in this wide a chunk of frequency spectrum is a blast. You can use the front panel tuning knob, the tune buttons on the remote, or enter frequencies into the VFOs directly on the front panel or the remote keypad. The main tuning knob rotation action is detented. I did run into some instances where the rebound of the switching action bounced the frequency back a step as I cranked. While this was a bit unusual, it was not a major annoyanceI did most of
my tuning with the remote control. I started out on the lower end of the range tuning through the AM broadcast band. Although the AM sensitivity in this frequency range is greater than 3 V (see Table 2), there were still plenty of distant stations to explore between the big locals. I tuned past a weather report from Toronto, a talk show in Buffalo and finally settled on listening to a ballgame rebroadcast from an Ohio station. AM audio quality, even when using the built in top-firing speaker, is quite goodon both broadcast and shortwave AM. Tuning up into the HF ham bands and listening in the SSB and CW modes revealed decent overall performance. While not quite up to the standards weve come to expect in radios designed specifically for the Amateur Radio market, this unit compares favorably with some of the other communications receivers weve looked at recently. The ability to tune in 10-Hz steps, the wide variety of available DSP-based filters and the IF shift feature worked very well for casual HF listening. In the SSB modes, you can select digital filter bandwidths of3, 2.5 or 2 kHz. For CW, you can choose from 5 bandwidths ranging from 800 Hz all the way down to 50 Hz. AM choices are 8, 6 and 3 kHz. Lab tests revealed two-tone, third-order IMD dynamic range in the HF bands in the high seventiesperformance does suffer a bit under busy band conditions. Moving up into the VHF region and beyond, the tremendous memory capacity, the

band scope and the automatic frequency storage system make it easy to find and collect interesting subjects for your listening library. Sorting through the accumulated frequencies, choosing which ones to keep or delete, assigning alphanumeric tags and deciding which bank to archive them in will keep you occupied for hours. If your main listening interests center around local FM activity in this upper end of the frequency spectrum, you may be a bit disappointed the lack of CTCSS squelch.

Overall Impressions

The AR7000B lures you in with its pretty face and its user-friendly programming scheme. What true electronics buff could possibly resist the opportunity to connect yet another audio/video device to the home entertainment system and add one more remote to the ever-growing pile on the coffee table? The AR7000B falls slightly short of the performance benchmarks set by some of the other tabletop receivers currently available in the AOR line. That saidits likely that some may be willing to compromise a bit of performance for the unique display and control arrangement and the interesting interconnectivity options offered by this receiver. Manufacturer: AOR USA, Inc, 20655 S Western Ave, Suite 112, Torrance, CA 90501; 310 787-8615; fax 310-787-8619; http:\\www.aorusa.com. Manufacturers suggested list price, $1460. Typical current street price, $1150.

From July 1999 QST ARRL

doc1

Can also be used to advance quick set mode items, initial set mode items, etc.
r FUNCTION DISPLAY Shows the operating frequency, dot matrix indications, selected memory channel, etc. See p. 7 for details. t TUNING STEP SWITCH [TS] (pgs. 17, 18) Push momentarily to cycle between 1 Hz/10 Hz, programmable and 1 MHz tuning steps.
1 and 10 Hz steps are only available in SSB, CW and RTTY modes; 1 MHz steps are only available in FM, WFM and AM modes.
Push and hold to scroll through the bands continuously. !0 MAIN DIAL TENSION LATCH Selects the main dial tension.
2 positions are available.
Push for 2 sec. to toggle between 1 and 10 Hz steps, or; when the programmable tuning steps is indicated, push for 2 sec. to enter programmable tuning step mode.
!1 MICROPHONE CONNECTOR (p. 8) Modular-type microphone connectorconnects the supplied microphone (HM-103).
The optional OPC-589 can be used to connect an 8-pin microphone such as the SM-8 or SM-20, if desired. A microphone connector is also available on the rear
panel. DO NOT connect 2 microphones simultaneously.
!2 LOCK SWITCH [LOCK] Push momentarily to turn the dial lock function ON and OFF.
The dial lock function electronically locks the main dial.
!8 M-CH CONTROL [M-CH] (inner control) When the RIT or SUBDIAL functions are OFF, rotate to select a memory channel number (p. 35). Shifts the receive frequency while the RIT function is ON in SSB, CW and RTTY modes (see below and p. 20).
RIT variable range is 9.99 kHz
When the optional UT-102 VOICE SYNTHESIZER UNIT is installed (p. 52), push for 2 sec. to have the frequency, etc. announced.
UT-102 operation can be adjusted in initial set mode (pgs. 53, 54).
Changes the operating frequency in the selected tuning steps while the SUB DIAL function is ON (p. 18). !9 HEADPHONE JACK [PHONES] (p. 12) Accepts headphones with 416 impedance.
When headphones are connected, no receive audio comes from the speaker. When the PHONES/SPEAKER switch on the back of the front panel is set to the [SPEAKER] position, an external speaker can be connected. This is convenient for mobile or outdoor operation.
Lights while the lock function is activated.
!3 DISPLAY SWITCH [DISP] (p. 68) Push momentarily to select one of the three menu sets: M1 to M4, S1 to S4 and G1 to G4. Push for 2 sec. to select quick set mode. !4 FUNCTION SWITCHES [F1]/[F2]/[F3] (pgs. 3, 4, 68) Push to select the function indicated in the dot matrix display above these switches.

Functions vary depending on the menu set selected.
@0 TUNER/CALL SWITCH [TUNER/CALL] (pgs. 26, 27) During HF/50 MHz operation, push this switch momentarily to toggle the automatic antenna tuner function ON/OFF.
An optional antenna tuner must be connected.
!5 MENU SWITCH [MENU] (p. 68) Push this switch one or more times to select menus within a menu set (M, S or G), or push to advance through the quick set mode and initial set mode displays. Push and hold to jump between two different function menu sets.
During HF/50 MHz operation, push this switch for 2 sec. to manually tune the antenna.
During 144/430 MHz operation, push this switch momentarily to select the call channel (or the previous channel/frequency when the call channel is already selected). (p. 39)
C1 is the 144 MHz call channel and C2 is the 430 MHz call channel.
!6 RIT/SUB DIAL SWITCH [RIT/SUB] (p. 20)
Push to toggle the RIT or SUB DIAL function ON and OFFinitial set mode is used to select the desired action*.
Lights green when the SUB DIAL function is ON; lights red when the RIT function is ON. Use the [M-CH] control to vary the RIT frequency or SUB DIAL frequency (see above).
Lights while the automatic tuning function is activated.
When the RIT function is ON, push for 2 sec. to add or subtract the shifted frequency to the operating frequency.

RIT SUB

@1 FRONT PANEL LATCH (p. 10) Pull away from the transceiver (towards yourself when looking at the front of the transceiver) to detach the front panel from the main body of the transceiver. @2 PREAMP/ATTENUATOR SWITCH [P.AMP/ATT] (p. 21) Push momentarily to turn the preamp ON or OFF. Push and hold to turn the 20 dB attenuator ON; push momentarily to turn the attenuator OFF.
Lights green when the preamp is ON; lights red when the 20 dB attenuator is ON.

P.AMP/ATT

Lights red while the RIT function is activated; green while the SUB DIAL function is activated.
*Even if RIT is selected in initial set mode, RIT cannot be selected when operating AM, FM or WFM modes.
!7 SHIFT CONTROL [SHIFT] (outer control; p. 20) Shifts the center frequency of the receivers IF passband.
Rotate the control clockwise to shift the center frequency higher, or rotate the control counterclockwise to shift the center frequency lower. When the graphic menu display (G2) is selected, the IF passband is graphically displayed and changes in accordance with the [SHIFT] control (see p. 20).
Lights green while the preamp is activated; lights red while the attenuator is activated.

I Rear and side panels

y u i !2 !3
KEY COMP GAIN DC 1 3.8 V BEEP /SIDE T

TUNER EXT SP

GND ANT 2
q GROUND TERMINAL [GND] (p. 9) Connect this terminal to a ground to prevent electrical shocks, TVI, BCI and other problems. w ANTENNA CONNECTORS [ANT 1], [ANT 2] (p. 11) Accept a 50 antenna with an PL-259 type plug.
[ANT 1] is for connection to an HF/50 MHz antenna. [ANT 2] is for connection to 144 MHz antenna. These connectors are switched above or below 60 MHz.
When connecting a straight key

When connecting a paddle

(dot) (com) (dash)
e DATA JACK [DATA] (p. 12) 6-pin min DIN jack to connect a TNC, etc. for packet operation. r ACCESSORY SOCKET [ACC] (p. 6) Enables connection to external equipment such as a TNC for data communications, a linear amplier or an automatic antenna selector/tuner, etc.
See page at right for socket information.
o DC POWER SOCKET [DC13.8V] (p. 13) Accepts 13.8 V DC through the supplied DC power cable.

Rear panel view

t RTTY JACK [RTTY] (p. 35) Connects an external terminal unit for RTTY (FSK) operation.
The keying polarity and mark/shift frequencies can be selected in quick set mode (p. 48).
!0 EXTERNAL SPEAKER JACK [EXT SP] (p. 12) Accepts a 416 speaker. !1 TUNER CONTROL SOCKET [TUNER] (p. 12) Accepts the control cable from an optional AH-3 AUTOMATIC ANTENNA TUNER.
y CI-V REMOTE CONTROL JACK [REMOTE] (p. 45) Designed for use with a personal computer for remote operation of transceiver functions. u MICROPHONE CONNECTOR [MIC] (p. 11) Accepts the supplied microphone (connected in parallel with the front panels [MIC] connector).
See pgs. 1 and 2 for microphone notes. See p. 8 for microphone connector information.
!2 SPEECH COMPRESSION LEVEL CONTROL [COMP GAIN] (p. 26) Adjusts the compression level.
This control is available only when the speech compressor is ON. Recommended level Counterclockwise decreases

COMP GAIN BEEP /SIDE T

i ELECTRONIC KEYER JACK [KEY] (p. 33) Accepts a paddle to activate the internal electronic keyer.
5 Selection between the internal electronic keyer and straight key operation can be made in quick set mode. (p. 49)

Clockwise increases

!3 BEEP/SIDETONE CONTROL [BEEP/SIDETONE] Adjusts the beep tone and CW side tone audio levels.

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

ACC SOCKET

ACC PIN # NAME

8V GND

DESCRIPTION

Regulated 8 V output. Connects to ground.

SPECIFICATIONS

Output voltage Output current : 8 V 0.3 V : Less than 10 mA

brown red

Input/output pin (HF/50 MHz). Ground level : 0.5 V to 0.8 V Goes to ground when transmitting. HSEND Input current : Less than 20 mA When grounded, transmits (connected to 8V (HF/50 MHz bands) line thru 2.2 k resistance/144 MHz operation). BDT BAND ALC Data line for the optional AT-180. Band voltage output. (Varies with amateur band) ALC voltage input. Output voltage Control voltage Input impedance : 0 to 8.0 V : 4 to 0 V : More than 10 k

FL-100

W: M: FL-272 N: FL-100 W: M: FL-272 N: FL-100 W: FL-272 M: FL-100 N: FL-101 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-100 W:FL-272 M: FL-223 N: FL-100 W: FL-272 M: FL-100 N: FL-232
W: M: FL-272 N: FL-101 W: FL-272 M: FL-100 N: FL-101 W: M: FL-272 N: FL-101 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-101 W:FL-272 M: FL-223 N: FL-101 W: FL-272 M: FL-232 N: FL-101
W:FL-103 M: FL-272 N: W:FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-100 W:FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-101 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: W:FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-223 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-232
W: M: FL-272 N: FL-223 W:FL-272 M: FL-223 N: FL-100 W: FL-272 M: FL-223 N: FL-101 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-223 W: M: FL-272 N: FL-223 W: FL-272 M: FL-223 N: FL-232
W: M: FL-272 N: FL-232 W:FL-272 M: FL-100 N: FL-232 W:FL-272 M: FL-232 N: FL-101 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: FL-223 W:FL-272 M: FL-223 N: FL-232 W: M: FL-272 N: FL-232
FL-100 M: FL-272 M: FL-272 FL-101 FL-103 FL-223 FL-232
FL-100 M: FL-272 FL-101 FL-103 FL-223 FL-232
N: FL-100 W: M: FL-272 N: FL-101 W: FL-103 M: FL-272 N: W: M: FL-272 N: FL-223 W: M: FL-272 N: FL-232
Table key: Wwide position Mmedium (normal) position NNarrow position
Normal Narrow Normal Narrow
FL-94 FL-272 FL-23 + SFPC455E FL-94
I DSP Functions (may require an optional unit depending on versionsee p. 61)
D ANF (Automatic Notch Filter) function
This function automatically attenuates beat tones, tuning signals, etc., even if they are moving. The automatic notch lter functions in SSB, FM and AM modes.

Select S4 (DSP menu).

Push [DISPLAY] 1 or 2 times when M or G is displayed. Push [MENU] one or more times to select S4. Push [(F-1)ANF] to toggle the automatic notch lter

BLANK S1 PO 40 60dB

ON and OFF.
DSP and ANF appear when the function is ON.

S4 ANF NR

D NR (Noise Reduction) function
This function reduces noise components and picks out desired signals which are buried in noise. The received AF signals are converted to digital signals and then the desired signals are separated from the noise. The noise reduction function is available for all operating modes.

Push [DISPLAY] 1 or 2 times when S or G appears. Push [MENU] one or more times to select M3. Push [(F-3)MET] one or more times to select the

desired meter function.

The display indication changes as in the table at right.
Note: The SWR meter cannot be used for the 144/430 MHz bands since the meter activates for the [ANT 1] connector only.

D Speech compressor

The IC-706MKIIG has a built-in, low distortion speech compressor circuit. This circuit increases your average talk power in SSB mode and is especially useful for DXing when the receiving station is having difculty copying your signal.
Select USB or LSB mode. Select the ALC meter.
Push [DISPLAY] 1 or 2 times to select M, if necessary. Push [MENU] one or more times to select M3, then push [(F-3)MET] one or more times to select ALC. Push [DISPLAY] for 2 sec. Push [MENU] one or more times to select Q2 MIC GAIN. [MENU] [(F-2)COM]
Select the mic gain display in quick set mode.

Adjust the mic gain.

While transmitting at your normal voice level, the ALC meter should read at about the middle of the ALC zone. Be sure the mic gain is in the range of 2 to 5.

[COMP GAIN]

Select M4.

COMP GAIN

BEEP /SIDE T
Push [DISPLAY] 1 or 2 times to select M, if necessary. Push [MENU] one or more times to select M4. Push [(F-2)COM], then adjust [COMP GAIN] so that
the ALC meter reads within the ALC zone whether you speak softly or loudly. Note: When the ALC meter peaks above the ALC zone, your transmitted voice may be distorted.
Adjust [COMP GAIN] so that the ALC meter reads within the ALC zone.

D VOX operation

The VOX (Voice-operated Transmission) function toggles between transmit and receive with your voice. This function provides an opportunity to input log entries into your computer, etc., while operating.
Select M4, then turn the VOX function ON.
Push [DISPLAY] 1 or 2 times when S or G appears. Push [MENU] one or more times to select M4. Push [(F-1)VOX] to turn the function ON. Push [DISPLAY] for 2 sec. then push [MENU] one or more times to select Q4. [MENU] [(F-1)VOX] main dial [DISPLAY]
Select VOX GAIN in quick set mode.
While speaking into the microphone, adjust [VOX Select VOX DELAY in quick set mode.
DELAY] as desired. GAIN] until the transceiver is transmitting.
Push [MENU] one or more times to select Q3.
While speaking into the microphone, adjust [VOX Select ANTI VOX in quick set mode. If the receive audio from the speaker toggles the
transceiver to transmit during receive, adjust the [ANTI-VOX] to the point where it has no effect. Push [DISPLAY] to exit quick set mode.
Push [MENU] one or more times to select Q5.
D Optional AT-180 AUTOMATIC ANTENNA TUNER operation
The AT-180 automatic antenna tuner matches the IC706MKIIG to the connected antenna automatically. Once the tuner matches an antenna, the variable capacitor angles are memorized as a preset point for each frequency range (100 kHz steps). Therefore, when you change the frequency range, the variable capacitors are automatically preset to the memorized point. MANUAL TUNING During SSB operation on HF bands at low voice levels, the AT-180 may not be tuned correctly. In such cases, manual tuning is helpful. Push and hold [TUNER] for 1 sec. to start manual tuning.

tone burst in quick set mode. Push [DISPLAY] for 2 sec., then push [MENU] one or more times to select Q4 RPTR TONE.
If FM mode has not been selected, this item does not appear.
mode, then set the receive frequency.

12 QUICK SPLIT

Set the tone frequency (quick set mode). See p. 49 for setting details and available frequencies.
Rotate the main dial to set a subaudible tone frequency or the 1750 Hz tone burst function. Push [DISPLAY] to exit quick set mode. Push [(F-1)SPL] for 2 sec. (in the M1 display) to activate the split frequency function (duplex function) with the pre-selected offset.

Q6 RPTR TONE

Push and hold [PTT] to transmit; release [PTT] to

receive.

When a 1750 Hz tone burst is selected, push and hold [(F-3)TON] in the M4 display while pushing [PTT] to send the 1750 Hz tone burst.
When a subaudible tone frequency (excepting 1750 Hz) is selected in , FM-T is selected simultaneously.

M4 VOX DUP TON

To check the repeater input frequency (direct signal from the other station), push and hold [(F-3)XFC] in the M1 display. To return to simplex operation, push [(F-1)SPL].
Each memory channel can store a tone frequency (subaudible tones or a tone burst) and an offset frequency, as well as the operating frequency. Store repeater information into memory channels for quick and easy access to repeaters.
PROGRAMMING DUPLEX SHIFT FREQUENCY Push [POWER] to turn power OFF. While pushing [LOCK], push [POWER] to turn Select DUP
power ON and enter initial set mode. 144M using [MENU] or the [UP]/[DN] keys, then rotate the main dial to select the desired duplex offset.
The duplex offset can be selected from 4000 kHz to +4000 kHz.

17 DUP 144M

I Tone squelch operation
Tone squelch operation is a method of communications using selective calling. Only received signals having a matching tone will open the squelch. Before communicating using tone squelch, all members of your party must agree on the tone squelch frequency to use.

Writing frequencies and operating modes into memo pads Select the S1 display. Push [(F-2)MPW] to program the frequency into a
memo pad. When you write a 6th frequency and operating mode, the oldest written frequency and operating mode are automatically erased to make room for the new settings. Note: Each memo pad must have its own unique combination of frequency and operating mode; memo pads having identical settings cannot be written.
Push [DISPLAY] 1 or 2 times to select S. Push [MENU] one or more times to select S1.
Displayed frequency and mode

Push MPW F-2

MP5 MP4 MP3 MP2

Newest

MP1 Oldest
The oldest written frequency and mode are erased.
Calling up a frequency from a memo pad
You can simply call up the desired frequency and operating mode of a memo pad by pushing [(F-3)MPR] in the S1 display.
Make sure S1 is selected in advance. Both VFO and memory modes can be use. The frequency and operating mode are called up, starting from the most recently written.

USB USB USB

MEMO PADS MP5 MP4
When you call up a frequency and an operating mode from memo pads with [(F-3)MPR], the previously displayed frequency and operating mode are automatically stored in a temporary pad. The frequency and operating mode in the temporary pad can be recalled by pushing [(F-3)MPR] one or more times. Note: If you change the frequency or operating mode called up from a memo pad, the frequency and operating mode in the temporary pad are erased.

VFO or MEMORY mode

MP2 MP1

I Scan types

PROGRAMMED SCAN
Repeatedly scans between two scan edge frequencies (scan edge memory channels 1A and 1B).

PRIORITY WATCH

Checks for signals on a memory or call channel while operating on a VFO frequency.
Memory channel watch Call channel watch
Scan Scan edge 1A or 1B Jump Scan edge 1B or 1A VFO frequency Memory channel VFO frequency Call channel
This scan operates in VFO mode.

MEMORY SCAN

Repeatedly scans all programmed memory channels.

S (select) BLANK

IC-706MKIIG TO CONTROLLER FE FE ECn Sc Data area FD
NG MESSAGE TO CONTROLLER FE FE 58 E0 FA FD
COMMAND TABLE Cn Sc xx 00*1 01*1 02*1 03*1 04*1 05*1 06*01 A0 B0 mc*2 Description Send frequency data Send mode data Read band edge frequencies Read display frequency Read display mode Set frequency data Set LSB Set USB Set AM Set CW Set RTTY Set FM Set WFM Set to VFO Set to VFO A Set to VFO B VFO A=B Switch VFO A and B Set to memory mode Mch Memory write Memory to VFO Memory clear Read duplex offset frequency Set duplex offset frequency Cn 0E Sc 09 xx 00 Description Scan stop Scan start Split OFF Split ON Simplex mode Duplex mode Duplex + mode 10 Hz TS 100 Hz TS 1 kHz TS 5 kHz TS 9 kHz TS 10 kHz TS 12.5 kHz TS 20 kHz TS 25 kHz TS 100 kHz TS ATT ON/OFF; 00=OFF; 20=ON Read squelch condition Read S-meter level Preamp setting AGC setting NB setting TONE setting TSQL setting COMP setting VOX setting BK-IN setting Read transceiver ID code

0A 0B 0C 0D

*1When wide or normal operation is available, add 00 for wide operation or 01 for normal operation; when normal or narrow operation is available, add 00 for normal operation or 01 for narrow operation; when wide, normal and narrow operation is available, add 00 for wide operation, 01 for normal operation and 02 for narrow operation. 2Memory channel number 1A=0100/1b=0101, 2A=0102/2b=0103, * 3A=0104/3b=0105, C1=0106, C2=0107.

SET MODE

I General
Set mode is used for programming infrequently changed values or conditions of functions. The IC706MKIIG has 2 separate set modes: quick set mode and initial set mode.
D Quick set mode operation
While power is ON, push [DISPLAY] for 2 sec.
Quick set mode is selected and one of its items appears. Quick set mode items vary depending on the operating mode (SSB, FM, etc.) selected.

[POWER]

Main dial [Y]
Push [MENU] one or more times to select the

desired item.

[M-CH] [MENU] [DISPLAY]
Rotate the main dial to set the values or conditions
for the selected item. Repeat steps and to set other items. To exit quick set mode, push [DISPLAY] momentarily.
[M-CH] or [Y]/[Z] can also be used.
[DISPLAY EXAMPLE: QUICK SET MODE]

Value or condition Item

Item number
D Initial set mode operation
Push [POWER] for 2 sec. to turn power OFF. While pushing [LOCK] push [POWER] to turn power Push [MENU] one or more times to select the
Initial set mode is selected and one of its items appears.

[M-CH] [MENU] [LOCK]

Rotate the main dial to set the values or conditions Repeat steps and to set other items. To exit initial set mode, push [POWER] for 2 sec. to Push [POWER] to turn power ON again.
The conditions selected in initial set mode are now effective.

Default is 0.100 MHz.

15 DUP HF

(duplex offset)

This item sets the offset for the duplex function when operating on the HF bands.

16 DUP 50M

This item sets the offset for the duplex function when operating on the 50 MHz band.

Default is 0.500 MHz.

This item sets the offset for the duplex function when operating on the 144 MHz band.

Default is 0.600 MHz.

18 DUP 430M
This item sets the offset for the duplex function when operating on the 430 MHz band.

Default is 5.000 MHz.

19 1TOUCH RPTR

(one touch repeater)

This item sets the offset direction when using the one-touch repeater function. +duplex or duplex can be selected.
Duplex direction is set to duplex.
Duplex direction is set to +duplex. 52

20 AUTO RPTR

(auto repeater)
When this item is set to on 1, the tone encoder is not set when the auto repeater is activated; when set to on 2 the auto repeater function also sets the tone encoder on.
Auto repeater function OFF (default).
Auto repeater function ON, tone encoder OFF.

21 SCAN RESUME

(scan resume)
This item sets the scan resume function ON or OFF. ON: scan resumes 10 sec. after stopping on a signal (or 2 sec. after a signal disappears); OFF: scan does not resume after stopping on a signal. For the priority watch, setting to OFF pauses the watch until signal disappears and scan resumes.
Scan resume function is turned ON (default).
Scan resume function is turned OFF.

22 SCAN SPEED

(scan speed)
This item sets the rate at which channels or frequencies are scanned during scan operations. High or low can be selected.
Scan speed is set to high (default).
Scan speed is set to low.

23 U/D SPEED

(up/down speed)
Up/down speed is set to high (default). Up/down speed is set to low.
This item sets the rate at which frequencies are scanned through when the [UP]/[DN] switches are pushed and held. High or low can be selected.

24 AM NB

(Noise blanker in AM mode)
When this item is set to ON, the noise blanker function is available in AM mode. This is useful when communicating in AM mode (the noise blanker function should not be used when listening to regular AM broadcasts as it may degrade the received audio).
Noise blanker available (default)
Noise blanker not available

25 PAD CH

(available memo pads)
5 memo pads are available (default). 10 memo pads are available.

FILTER unit

D Bottom view
144/430 MHz Final amplifier (SRFJ7044) HF Final amplifier (SRFJ7044 x 2) PA unit
Optional crystal (CR-282) Reference freq. check point (60.000 MHz) Reference freq. adj. (L601) (when optional crystal is installed)

OPTIONS

IC-PW1 HF + 50 MHz 1 kW LINEAR AMPLIFIER
AT-180 HF/50 MHz AUTOMATIC

ANTENNA TUNER

Full-duty 1 kW linear amplier including an automatic antenna tuner. Has automatic tuning and band selection capability. Full break-in (QSK) operation is possible. The amplier/power supply unit and the remote control unit are separated. The OPC-599 is necessary to connect the IC706MKIIG to the IC-PW1.
Fully automatic antenna tuner with preset memories for each 100 kHz. Unique automatic tuner on function is available. See p. 62 for AT-180 specications.
AH-4 HF AUTOMATIC ANTENNA

AH-2b ANTENNA ELEMENT

HM-118T HAND MICROPHONE
Specially designed to tune a long wire antenna for portable or mobile HF/50 MHz operation. The PTT tune function provides simple operation. Input power rating: 150 W
A 2.5 m long antenna element for mobile operation with the AH-3. Frequency coverage 3.528 MHz band with the AH-3
Includes DTMF keypad, hand microphone.

PS-85 DC POWER SUPPLY

SM-8 DESKTOP MICROPHONE

SM-20 DESKTOP MICROPHONE

Light weight switching regulator system power supply. Output voltage: 13.8 V DC Max. current drain: 20 A
Including 2 connection cables for simultaneous connection of 2 transceivers. Has [UP]/[DOWN] switches. The OPC-589 is necessary to use this microphone.
Includes [UP]/[DOWN] switches and a low cut function. The OPC-589 is necessary to use this microphone.

MB-62 MOBILE MOUNTING

BRACKET

MB-63 MOUNTING BRACKET

MB-65 MOUNTING BASE
Mounts the transceiver main body, with or without the front panel, inside a vehicle.
Metal plate for attaching the front panel to a wall or other such at surface.
Allows you to conveniently vehicle-mount the front panel of the IC-706MKIIG. An MB-63 must be used in combination with the MB-65.

SP-7 EXTERNAL SPEAKER

SP-10 EXTERNAL SPEAKER SP-12 EXTERNAL SPEAKER

SP-20 EXTERNAL SPEAKER

SP-12 Compact speaker for base station operation. Height can be adjusted for your convenience. Input impedance: 8 Max. input power: 5 W
SP-10 Equipped with 4 types of audio lters, a headphone jack and can be connected to 2 transceivers. Input impedance: 8 Max. input power: 5 W
External speakers suitable for mobile operation. SP-12: Slim-type; 8 /3 W SP-10: Compact-type; 4 /5 W

SP-21 EXTERNAL SPEAKER

CT-16 SATELLITE INTERFACE
CT-17 CI-V LEVEL CONVERTER
External speaker designed for base station operation. Input impedance: 8 Max. input power: 5 W

Mode availability Confirmation beeps Band edge beeps Display backlighting Key backlighting Auto power OFF function RF gain/squelch control Sub dial RIT function Optional filter 1 Optional filter 2 Meter peak function Quick split function Split lock function Quick split offset Quick split offset (HF) Quick split offset (50 MHz) Quick split offset (144 MHz) Quick split offset (430 MHz) One touch repeater
Power OFF then ON to exit initial set mode. No. Indication 36 AUTO RPTR SCAN RESUME SCAN SPEED U/D SPEED AM NB PAD CH PWR ON CHK A-TUNE STRT PTT TUNE 9600 MODE VSEND SEL SPEECH LANG SPEECH SPD S-LVL SPC CI-V ADDRES CI-V BAUD CI-V TRN Description
Auto repeater function Scan resume condition Scanning speed [UP]/[DN] speed AM noise blanker No. of memory pads Power ON check function Auto tune start function PTT tune function Packet data speed ACC output selection Speech synthesizer lang. Speech synthesizer speed Speech synthesizer S-meter CI-V address assignment Data transfer rate CI-V transceive CI-V 731

Initial set mode

No. 17 18
S1 M1 SPL A/B A=B XFC (when split is ON) S2

DISPLAY MENU

MW SCN

PRI V/M SEL (in memory

MV V/M MCL (in memory mode) NB COM BRK MET

144 NRL

FIL VOX 1/4 1/4 VOX
AGC (SSB/AM) AGC (CW) AGC (RTTY)

M4 M4 M4

G1 G2 G3 G4
BAND scope IF SHIFT TX freq. Memory name

TON (FM)

For 2 sec. RTTY mode RF POWER RTTY TONE RTTY SHIFT RTTY KEYING

Quick set mode

No. Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5
SSB/AM/FM mode RF POWER MIC GAIN VOX DELAY VOX GAIN ANTI VOX CARRIER Freq*1 RPTR TONE*2 TONE SQL*2 RPTR-T*3 T-SQL*4
CW mode RF POWER CW PITCH BK-IN DELAY CW PADDLE KEY SPEED RATIO

Q6 Q7 Q8

* SSB mode only; * FM mode only; * FM mode only/tone encoder ON; *4FM mode only/tone squelch ON.

Count on us!

A-5564H-1EX-r Printed in Japan Copyright 2001 by Icom Inc.
1-1-32 Kamiminami, Hirano-ku, Osaka 547-0003, Japan

ABOUT CE

DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY

We Icom Inc. Japan

1-1-32 Kamiminami, Hirano-ku, Osaka 547-0003 Japan Declare on our sole responsibility that this equipment complies with the essential requirements of the Radio and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive, 1999/5/CE, and that any applicable Essential Test Suite measurements have been performed. Kind of equipment: Type-designation: HF/VHF/UHF ALL MODE TRANSCEIVER

Dsseldorf 13th Mar. 2001 Place and date of issue

i706MKIIG

Icom (Europe) GmbH
Himmelgeister strae 100 D-40225 Dsseldorf Authorized representative name
Version (where applicable): This compliance is based on conformity according to Annex III of the RTTE Directive 1999/5/EC using the following harmonised standards: i) Article 3.1a EN 60950 + A11 ii) Article 3.1b EN 301489-1 and EN 301489-15 iii) Article 3.2 EN 301 783-2 iv) v)

T. Aoki General Manager

Signature
Version and frequency coverage
Europe (#02, #12) Tx 1.800000 1.850000 3.500000 3.800000 7.000000 7.100000 10.100000 10.150000 14.000000 14.350000 18.068000 18.168000 21.000000 21.450000 24.890000 24.990000 28.000000 29.700000 50.000000 52.000000 144.000000 146.000000 430.000000 440.000000 Rx 0.030000 50.000000 144.000000 430.000000 29.999999 52.000000 146.000000 440.000000 Spain (#04,#14) Tx 1.830000 3.500000 7.000000 10.100000 14.000000 18.068000 21.000000 24.890000 28.000000 50.000000 144.000000 430.000000 1.850000 3.800000 7.100000 10.150000 14.350000 18.168000 21.450000 24.990000 29.700000 50.200000 146.000000 440.000000 Rx 1.830000 3.500000 7.000000 10.100000 14.000000 18.068000 21.000000 24.890000 28.000000 50.000000 144.000000 430.000000 1.850000 3.800000 7.100000 10.150000 14.350000 18.168000 21.450000 24.990000 29.700000 50.200000 146.000000 440.000000
France (#03,#13) Tx 1.810000 1.850000 3.500000 3.800000 7.000000 7.100000 10.100000 10.150000 14.000000 14.350000 18.068000 18.168000 21.000000 21.450000 24.890000 24.990000 28.000000 29.700000 50.200000 51.200000 144.000000 146.000000 430.000000 440.000000
1.810000 3.500000 7.000000 10.100000 14.000000 18.068000 21.000000 24.890000 28.000000 50.200000 144.000000 430.000000
1.850000 3.800000 7.100000 10.150000 14.350000 18.168000 21.450000 24.990000 29.700000 51.200000 146.000000 440.000000
Italy (#10,#20) Tx 1.830000 3.500000 7.000000 10.100000 14.000000 18.068000 21.000000 24.890000 28.000000 50.000000 144.000000 430.000000 435.000000
1.850000 3.800000 7.100000 10.150000 14.350000 18.168000 21.450000 24.990000 29.700000 51.000000 146.000000 434.000000 438.000000
1.830000 3.500000 7.000000 10.100000 14.000000 18.068000 21.000000 24.890000 28.000000 50.000000 144.000000 430.000000 435.000000
1.850000 3.800000 7.100000 10.150000 14.350000 18.168000 21.450000 24.990000 29.700000 51.000000 146.000000 434.000000 438.000000 (UNIT: MHz)

About DC power supply.

The use of IC-706MKIIG (#02, #12, #03, #13, #04, #14, #10, #20) in combination with The DC power supply complies with European Harmonised Standard regulations under the conditions listed below. Conditions In combination with PS-125 When connected to a power supply via OPC-639

IC-706MKIIG #02, #12 (Europe) < Intended Country of Use >
IC-706MKIIG #04 ,#14 (Spain) < Intended Country of Use >

GER AUT GBR IRL FRA

NED BEL LUX ESP POR

ITA GRE SWE DEN FIN

EIRP Clearance heights by frequency band
Watts m 2.1 m 2.8 m 3.4 m 5m 12 m 70 cm 2m 2.7 m 3.3 m 4.7 m 11.5 m 23 cm 13cm and above 2m 2m 2.5 m 2.3 m 2.7 m 2.5 m 3.6 m 3.2 m 7.3 m 6.3 m
IC-706MKIIG #03, #13 (France) < Intended Country of Use > IC-706MKIIG #10, #20 (Italy) < Intended Country of Use >
1-1-32 Kamiminami, Hirano-ku, Osaka 547-0003 Japan A-6045H-1EU Printed in Japan 2001 Icom Inc.
ABOUT SP-7 EXTERNAL SPEAKER
If the SP-7 external speaker is used with the IC-706MKIIG, please install the ferrite supplied bead on the speaker cable, as shown below. A ferrite bead and a cable fastener are supplied with IC-706MKIIG.
INSTALLATION NOTE: Install the ferrite bead as near as possible the connecting plug. Attach the ferrite bead making a loop with the cable as shown in the diagram at below left. Fasten the ferrite bead and speaker cable with the supplied cable fastener.

Cable fastener pull

1-1-32 Kamiminami, Hirano-ku, Osaka 547-0003 Japan A-6045H-2EU Printed in Japan 2001 Icom Inc.

 

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