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Toshiba Tecra 8100

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Toshiba Tecra 8100Toshiba Tecra 8100 - PIII 500 MHz - 14.1″ - 64 MB Ram - 6 GB HDD

Black, Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 6.4 lbs, Lithium ion battery 3.5 hour(s), 12.3″ x 10″ x 1.6″

The Tecra 8000 series' innovative design supports a single motherboard and allows customers a choice of standard models. This Tecra series was designed to provide unparalleled performance while streamlining qualification time by reducing support costs, minimizing personnel training and providing standardized and interchangeable components. Toshiba offers a variety of configuration options, so businesses can match features to their requirements and upgrade as needed over time, extending the l... Read more

 

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Comments to date: 1. Page 1 of 1. Average Rating:
Abdtsc 10:29pm on Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 
Light, sleek and stylish. Great performance and great value for money. Largest screen size is 14.1 Inches. Why did I buy the Tecra 8100? First of all what I wanted was a desktop replacement machine. Why did I buy the Tecra 8100? First of all what I wanted was a desktop replacement machine.

Comments posted on www.ps2netdrivers.net are solely the views and opinions of the people posting them and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of us.

 

Documents

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Notes for users in Australia and New Zealand
For information on using a modem in Australia and New Zealand, see the internal modem users guide that shipped with your unit.
Instructions for IC CS-03 certified equipment
NOTICE: The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective, operational and safety requirements as prescribed in the appropriate Terminal Equipment Technical Requirements document(s). The Department does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the users satisfaction. Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection. The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some situations. Repairs to certified equipment should be coordinated by a representative designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect the equipment. Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas. Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
The user manual of analog equipment must contain the equipments Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) and an explanation notice similar to the following: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) of this device is 0.4B. NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) assigned to each terminal device provides an indication of the maximum number of terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination on an interface may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the sum of the Ringer Equivalence Numbers of all the devices does not exceed 5.
The standard connecting arrangement (telephone jack type) for this equipment is jack type(s): USOC RJ11C.
CD-ROM / DVD-ROM Safety Instruction
The CD-ROM / DVD-ROM drive employs a laser system. To ensure proper use of this product, please read this instruction manual carefully and retain for future reference. Should the unit ever require maintenance, contact an authorized service location. Use of controls, adjustments or the performance of procedures other than those specified may result in hazardous radiation exposure. To prevent direct exposure to the laser beam, do not try to open the enclosure.
Location of the required label
(Sample shown below. Location of the label and manufacturing information may vary.)

Exposing the power button
Press and hold the power button in until the on/off light on the system indicator panel turns on (green)about one second.
Turning on the power The AC power light glows when the computer is connected to an external power source. The battery light does not glow if the AC adapter is not plugged in. If the adapter is plugged in, the battery light glows amber while the battery is being charged, and glows green when it is fully charged. If a battery is installed in the SelectBay, the SelectBay battery light glows amber when the battery is charging and green when the battery is fully charged. Otherwise the light is off. The hard disk drive light flashes to indicate that the hard disk drive is currently in use. If there is a disk device installed in the SelectBay, the SelectBay drive light flashes periodically to indicate that the device is available, and flashes when the device is in use. CAUTION: Never turn off the computer while any of the drives are in use.
Getting Started Operating system
The preinstalled operating system will load automatically. CAUTION: When you turn on the computer for the first time, dont turn off the power again until the operating system has loaded completely.

Operating system

Your computer comes with one of the following operating systems preinstalled:
Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0
The appropriate Microsoft operating system documentation comes with your Toshiba computer.
Using the computer for the first time
When you start your computer for the first time, it prompts you to:
Set up your software Set date/time properties Set up your printer Complete the initial start-up procedure Register your computer
Windows automatically detects and installs the devices it finds on your computer. Follow the instructions on the screen to properly set up and register your computer.
Getting Started Using the computer for the first time
Registering your computer
The last step in setting up your computer is to register your computer. Sending in your product registration card lets Toshiba keep you up to date with information about new products and upgrades. Registering your computer also extends your Toshiba warranty worldwide at no charge to you. See the registration card and warranty information for details about the warranty options available from Toshiba. Windows NT does not support online registration. To register your computer, complete and mail the registration card provided by Toshiba. HINT: After you turn on the computer for the first time, it may give you the option to register online. To register online, double-click the icon provided and follow the instructions.(Online registration is not available in Windows NT).

Connecting Other External Devices
This chapter describes how to connect devices that can increase the capabilities of your Tecra computer.
Using external display devices
Your Tecra computer comes with a built-in LCD display, but you can also connect three different types of external display devices to one of two available video ports:
A television via the composite video port. TECHNICAL NOTE: In Windows 98 Second Edition, you dont need an Internet connection to watch cable or broadcast TV, but you must purchase a compatible TV tuner card.
A video display device, such as a video projection unit via the composite video port. An external SVGA monitor via the monitor port.
Connecting Other External Devices Using external display devices
Before connecting your television, video projector, monitor or other display device, configure your computer for the type of device youre connecting. To do this, refer to your operating system documentation.
Connecting the display device
If youre connecting a television or other video display device to the computers composite video port, refer to the following section for guidelines on choosing a video cable, then refer to Connecting to the composite video port on page 33. HINT: You may choose to have both the LCD display and an external video device display simultaneously. This is available only if youve set the Controller Option to Dual Controller. Set the S3 Savage/MX video controller option by clicking Start, Settings, Control Panel and clicking Display Properties. Choose the Settings tab, click the Advanced Properties button and select S3 Dual View.
If youre connecting an SVGA monitor, skip to Connecting an external monitor on page 33.

Selecting video cables

To connect a device to the composite video port, you need a composite video cable. For the best video quality, always use a properly shielded cable. HINT: Toshiba recommends using a cable no longer than 20 feet (approximately 6 meters).
Using a poor quality cable may result in a dull or fuzzy picture, poor color, ghosting, video noise, or loss of video. Part I: Getting to Know Your Computer

Using a mouse

You may want to use a mouse instead of the computers built-in pointing device, the AccuPoint II. You can use a serial mouse or a PS/2-compatible mouse. Part I: Getting to Know Your Computer
Connecting Other External Devices Using a mouse
A serial mouse disables the AccuPoint II. With a PS/2 mouse, you can choose to have the AccuPoint II active at the same time.
Setting up a PS/2 mouse with the AccuPoint II
When you connect a PS/2-compatible mouse to the PS/2 port, you may use the mouse, the AccuPoint II, or both. CAUTION: When connecting any PS/2 device, Toshiba recommends turning off your computer to prevent any possible hardware damage.
PS/2 mouse with Windows 98 Second Edition
To set the PS/2 mouse to work simultaneously with the AccuPoint II: 3 Click Start, Settings, then point to Control Panel. Double click the Toshiba Hardware Setup icon. Select the Pointing Devices tab and click Simultaneous. TECHNICAL NOTE: You can also set this using the Pointing Devices setting in TSETUP.
PS/2 mouse with Windows NT
To set the PS/2 mouse to work simultaneously with the AccuPoint II: 3 Click Start, select Programs, then select Toshiba Utilities. Click Hardware Setup, click the Hardware Options button, and then select the Pointing Devices tab. Select the Simultaneous radio button and click OK. Part I: Getting to Know Your Computer
Connecting Other External Devices Connecting a local printer
Your computer will prompt you to reboot in order for your changes to take effect.
Connecting a local printer
CAUTION: Never connect the printer cable while the computers power is on. Doing so may damage the printer, the computer, or both.
Before you can connect a printer, you need to know whether it uses a serial or a parallel interface. Check the printers documentation. If the printer can be switched between serial and parallel mode, choose parallel because it is faster. You also need a suitable printer cable, which may come with your printer. Otherwise, you can purchase one from a computer or electronics store. NOTE: If your printer is ECP- or IEEE-compliant, make sure your printer cable is an IEEE 1284 cable.
These instructions assume you have a parallel printer, which is the most common type of interface. To connect the printer: If the computer is on, turn it off. Connect the printer cable to the printer and to the computers parallel port. Use the printer cable illustration as a connection guide.
Connecting Other External Devices Connecting the external diskette drive

To the computer

To the printer
Identifying the ends of a parallel printer cable Plug the printers power cable into a live electrical outlet. See your printer documentation for additional configuration steps.
For more information on getting your printer to print, see Printing your work on page 72.

Inserting a module into the SelectBay
This section explains how to install the module and its cover into the SelectBay. 1 Snap the module into the cover, if necessary. To install the diskette drive module, you must remove it from its external casing. For details, see Inserting the diskette drive module on page 50. To install the battery, you must make sure its in the battery case. See Placing the battery into the adapter on page 51 and Removing the battery from the adapter on page 52. 2 Slide the module all the way into the SelectBay.
Inserting the diskette drive module
The diskette drive module ships in a case, ready to connect to the external diskette drive port. Before installing the diskette drive module into the SelectBay, you must remove it from the case. 1 Simultaneously pinch the two eject buttons. The diskette drive will partially eject from the case.
Carefully pull the diskette drive by the front edges to completely remove it from the case.

Eject buttons

Releasing the drive module Once the drive module is out of its case, you can attach it to the SelectBay drive cover.
Using the secondary battery in the SelectBay
The optional secondary battery is shipped with an adapter that fits into the SelectBay.
Placing the battery into the adapter
You must assemble the secondary battery and the adapter before placing the battery into the cover and installing it into the SelectBay.

Battery

Adapter Battery release lever
Snapping the battery into the adapter To place the battery into the adapter: Align the contacts on the battery with the contacts on the adapter. Push down to snap the battery into the adapter.
Removing the battery from the adapter
Removing the battery from the adapter Holding the front of the battery adapter toward you, slide the battery release latch to your right. Holding the latch to the right, push up on the front of the battery until it pops out of the adapter.
Connecting Other External Devices Inserting and removing PC Cards
Inserting and removing PC Cards
Your Tecra 8100 computer comes with two stacked PC Card slots and supports three types of PC Cards:
Type I cards and Type II cards are used for modems, fax/ modems, data storage, network cards, and more. You can install up to two of these cards, one in each slot. Type III cards are used for removable hard disks and other functions that require a larger card. You can install just one of these cards.

Inserting a PC Card

Before you insert your PC Card, read through the documentation that comes with the card to see if you need to do anything before you insert it. CAUTION: Your Tecra 8100 computer came with all the Card and Socket Services programs you need. Even if your PC Card comes with its own version of Card and Socket Services, you should use the files provided on your computer.

Scan all new files for viruses. This precaution is especially important for files you receive via diskette, email, or download from the Internet. Occasionally, even new programs you buy from a supplier may contain a computer virus. Your computer is equipped with a virus-scan program.

Computing tips

Save your work frequently. Your work stays in the computers temporary memory until you save it to the disk. You will lose all the work since your last save if, for example, the network you are using goes down and you must restart your computer to reconnect, or your battery runs out of charge while you are working. HINT: Some programs have an automatic-save feature which you can turn on. This feature saves your file to the hard disk at preset intervals. See your software documentation for details.
Back up your files to disks (or other removable media) on a regular basis. Label the backup copies clearly and store them in a safe place. Its easy to put off backing up because it takes time. However, if your hard disk suddenly fails, you will lose all the data on it unless you have a separate backup copy.
Use ScanDisk, Disk Defragmenter, and the Maintenance Wizard regularly to conserve disk space and help your computer perform at its optimal level. Consult your Windows 98 Second Edition documentation for more information on these and other utilities.
Learning the Basics Windows basics
Take frequent breaks to avoid repetitive-motion injuries and eyestrain. Before turning off the computer, always use the Shut Down or Standby command in Windows 98 Second Edition, or use the Shut Down or Suspend command in Windows NT. CAUTION: Windows records information, such as your desktop setup, during its shutdown procedure. If you do not let Windows shut down normally, details such as new icon positions may be lost.

Windows basics

Windows 98 Second Edition or Windows NT Workstation 4.0 is the computers operating system. If youve used a Macintosh or Windows 98 or 95, youll find Windows 98 Second Edition or Windows NT Workstation is similar in many ways. For answers to common questions, click Start, click Help to open the online help, then double-click If youve used Windows before.

Logging on to Windows NT

A major difference between Windows NT and other versions of Windows is that you have to log on, even when your computer is not connected to a network. To turn on your computer and log on to Windows NT: If the external diskette drive is connected to the computer, check that it is empty. If a printer or other external device is connected to the computer, turn on the device.

Click Start, then Hibernate. You can also use Hibernation mode. While Standby or Suspend/Resume (memory) mode saves your current work to memory in Long Life mode, Hibernation mode saves it to the hard disk. TECHNICAL NOTE: If you use Standby and your battery dies, you will lose the information held in memory. With Hibernation mode, you will not lose that information.

Using Standby command

Standby command maintains the operating state of your computer in memory while the computer is off. With Standby enabled, whenever you turn the computer on youll be able to continue working where you left off. NOTE: Standby command is not available on Windows NT.
To shut down the computer using Standby:
In Windows 98 Second Edition, click Start, Shut down, select Stand by, and click OK.
Shut Down Windows dialog box (Windows 98 Second Edition)
In Windows NT, click Start, then Suspend, -orclick Start, Shut down, select Stand by, and click OK.
Shut Down Windows dialog box (Windows NT) The computer saves the state of all open programs, turns off the display, and goes into a low-power suspended state. The on/off light pulsates amber indicating the machine is in Standby. To turn on the computer, press and hold the power button until the on/off light changes to green. The computer returns to the previous settings. You can also configure the computer to shut down in Standby when you press the power button. For more information, see Shutdown mode on page 257.
Using Suspend/Resume (memory) mode
Suspend/Resume (memory) mode is a Toshiba utility that maintains the operating state of your computer in memory while the computer is off. With Suspend/Resume (memory) mode
enabled, whenever you turn the computer on youll be able to continue working where you left off. NOTE: Suspend/Resume (memory) mode is not available on Windows 98 Second Edition.
You can enable Suspend/Resume (memory) mode in either of the following ways:
Click the Start menu button, then click Suspend. Press and hold the Fn key, then press and release the F3 key. When the pop-up window appears, press and release F3 until the Suspend/Resume (memory) mode icon is highlighted, then release the Fn key. Open the Power Saver utility in Control panel, click select Battery Power, click Details, then click the System tab. Select the Resume mode option and click OK.

Description AudioChanges the audio track currently being played to another audio track located on the DVD disc. This feature is most commonly used with multilanguage content to change the spoken/heard language. This feature is enabled only when the content allows dynamic changes of the audio track.
NOTE: Some audio changes must be made through the Title or Root menu.
SubtitleDisplays or changes subtitles to be viewed on-screen. This feature is enabled only for DVD content that includes subtitles and offers the ability to make dynamic changes of subtitle information. Some subtitle changes must be made through the Main Menu. Root Menu/ResumeDisplays the DVD root menu for selection of DVD content for playback. The functionality of the Resume feature depends on the content being played. Some content resumes playback when you click the Root Menu/Resume button again. This action starts the playback of the content from the location where you left the content for the Root Menu. Other content requires an action within the menu (for example, click Play Movie) to resume playback.
Description Title Menu/ResumeDisplays the Title Menu for selection of content for playback. The functionality of the Resume feature depends on the content being played. Some content resumes playback when you click the Title Menu/Resume button again. This action starts the playback of the content from the location where you left the content for the Title Menu. Other content requires an action within the menu (for example, click Play Movie) to resume playback.
Using the DVDExpress shortcut keys
The shortcut keys available in DVDExpress are listed in the controls and indicators table starting on page 124. HINT: To display the DVDExpress control panel when the video is in full screen mode, move your mouse pointer out of the screen area (for example, to the bottom of the screen).
Accessing the shortcut menu
The shortcut menu appears when you click the secondary AccuPoint II button on the DVDExpress control panel. It offers alternative access to a number of features.

Shortcut menu

Using DVDExpress options
To access DVDExpress DVD options: 1 2
Launch DVDExpress, if it is not already running. On the DVDExpress control panel, click the Options button.

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Fn-esse. Hardware Setup. TSETUP. Using Power Management. Power Saver. Expansion device properties.

Toshiba Utilities

Your computer includes several utilities designed to help you to reconfigure your system to best meet your individual needs. Additionally, Toshiba has added a tab to the Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition Power Management utility. Together, these allow you to ascertain certain system details, set additional options or change default options. The Toshiba utilities are:
Fn-esse Hardware Setup TSETUP Power Management Power Saver
Each of these utilities is described in this chapter.

Fn-esse

Toshibas Fn-esse program and Windows shortcuts provide quick ways to open programs, documents, and folders from within any Windows program without using the Start menu. This section
Toshiba Utilities Fn-esse
describes how to use the Fn-esse program to quickly access your programs and files. With Fn-esse, you can assign an Fn key combination to:
Open a Windows program. Open a file in its associated Windows program. Display a customized folder of Windows programs and/or files from which to choose.
Fn-esse also has several keys that perform preassigned operations, known as hot keys. For more information, see Hot Keys on page 255. You can assign any key that is not associated with a hot key or a keyboard overlay.

Starting Fn-esse

To start Fn-esse, click Start, then point to Programs, Toshiba Utilities, and then click Fn-esse. The Fn-esse keyboard appears.
The Fn-esse window The keys are color-coded as follows:
Available keys are black. Assigned keys are blue. Unavailable keys are dark gray.
Keys associated with a pop-up list have a small dot on the upper-left corner of the key.
Assigning a key to a program or document
There are three ways to assign a key to open a program or document:
Drag-and-drop The Fn-esse Browser dialog box The Application Explorer pop-up list
The method most often used is drag-and-drop.

Using drag-and-drop

To assign a key to a program or document: Open both Fn-esse and Windows Explorer. Resize the Explorer window so you can see both the Fn-esse keyboard and Explorer at the same time. In the Explorer window, highlight the program or document file you wish to assign to a key. Click and hold the primary button as you drag the highlighted item from Explorer to the key on the Fn-esse keyboard to which you wish to assign it. Release the primary button. Fn-esse displays the Add/Edit Command dialog box completely filled in to reflect the selected program or document. 6 Click OK to close the Add/Edit Command dialog box with your key assignment in place.

There are two methods for accessing TSETUP:
Hold down the Esc key, then turn on the computer. When you receive the following message: Check system. Then press [F1] key, press F1. Turn on the computer, and hold down F8 until the startup menu appears. Use the down arrow key to move the cursor to item 6 (Safe Mode Command Prompt Only) on the list and press Enter. This will take you to an MS-DOS screen. At the MS-DOS prompt, type cd \windows and press Enter. Then, type TSETUP and press Enter.
Toshiba Utilities Using Power Management
The first page of TSETUP appears.
SYSTEMSETUP(1/2) MEMORY Total=65536KB PASSWORD NotRegistered BATTERY BatterySaveMode=FullPower PERIPHERAL OperatingSystem=Non-ACPI PointingDevices=Auto-Selected ExtKeyboard"Fn"=Disabled USBLegacyEmulation=Disabled ParallelPortMode=ECP HardDiskMode=EnhancedIDE(Normal) BOOTPRIORITY BootPriority=FDD HDDPriority= Built-inHDD DISPLAY PowerOnDisplay=Auto-Selected LCDDisplayStretch=Disabled MultiDisplayAdapt.=SingleAdapt. TVConfig. OTHERS Power-upMode=Boot CPUCache=Enabled Level2Cache=Enabled AutoPowerOn=Disabled AlarmVolume=High SystemBeep=Enabled

HDD CD-ROM

BIOSversion=x.xx

SecondHDD

:SelectItems Esc:Exitwithoutsaving
Space,BkSp:Changevalues Home:Setdefaultvalues
PgDn,PgUp:Changepages End:SavechangesandExit
A sample TSETUP screen There are two screens, each of which is a table displaying default settings. To change (or view) the options available for any particular setting, use the arrow keys to move to the setting and press the spacebar to scroll through the options. Once you exit MS-DOS, any changes made to TSETUP become the default settings when you restart your system.

Using Power Management

Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition includes a power management utility that allows you to change many of your default power settings. NOTE: Toshiba recommends that you use the Microsoft Power Manager to set the Hibernation option only. For other power-saving options, use the Toshiba Power Saver utility.
To access the Power Management program: Open the Start menu, point to Settings, then click Control Panel. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Power Management icon. A dialog box appears advising you to use Power Saver to adjust the computers power management settings.

Managing Your Tecra 8100 Computer System management
The Tecra 8100 offers two features that help the IT administrator handle inventory management. First, it provides automatic recognition and recording of the serial numbers of the computer and key components, including hard disk drives, batteries, and the NetDock. This is reported via DMI and available to all applications. Second, the Tecras BIOS asset tagging feature allows the client or IT administrator to store their own asset tag with a unique custom-generated identification number that is written to FLASH memory after purchase. This can be accomplished remotely through a DMI-compliant application. The Tecra 8100 sleep function enhances inventory and fault management after hours by allowing the IT administrator to access the computer remotely via the LAN connection. While sleep is much like Wake on LAN, it offers the additional feature of preventing non-secure keystrokes to the keyboard while the system is powered up.

Configuration management

Asset management is more than inventory control. It includes managing the upgrade and configuration of system software. An administrators console enables network personnel to unobtrusively view each PC workstations status. With security set to full access, technicians can transfer files and remotely reboot the client workstation, as necessary. Toshiba expands configuration options through its proprietary Configuration Builder technology. The Configuration Builder CD that ships with the Tecra 8100 gives users the ability to completely recover their systems, reinstall individual software, or create a completely new configuration. Custom configuration is possible through a database that contains automated installations for each bundled software component, along with a set of integration rules that specify loading order, dependencies, and mutual exclusions.

Fault management

There are three distinct categories of fault management:
Prevention: that which is done to ensure that a fault does not occur. Prediction: if a fault is anticipated, the ability to forewarn the user in advance of an occurrence. Notification and Analysis: if a fault does occur, the ability to fix the problem quickly and cleanly and to collect detailed analysis as to the cause of the fault.

1024x768pels 8x16

SVGA Grph SVGA Grph
1280x1024 pels 1600x1200 pels

8x16 8x16

256/256K 8x16 (virtual) 256/256K 8x16 (virtual) 32K/32K 8x16
256/256K 35.5kHz 87Hz* 35.5kHz 60Hz 256/256K 35.5kHz 87Hz* 32K/32K 31.5kHz 60Hz 37.6kHz 75Hz 43.2kHz 85Hz 64K/64K 31.5kHz 60Hz 37.6kHz 75Hz 43.2kHz 85Hz

640x480 pels 8x16

64K/64K 8x16
Internal LCD Mode (hex) 42 Type SVGA Grph SVGA Grph SVGA Grph Resolution Grid (pelxpel) Colors
External Monitor Grid (pelxpel) Colors

Scan Freq. hor.

32K/32K 8x16
32K/32K 37.9kHz 60Hz 46.9kHz 75Hz 53.7kHz 85Hz 64K/64K 37.9kHz 60Hz 46.9kHz 75Hz 53.7kHz 85Hz 32K/32K 35.5kHz 48.5kHz 60.0kHz 68.8kHz 64K/64K 35.5kHz 48.5kHz 60.0kHz 68.8kHz 87Hz* 60Hz 75Hz 85Hz 87Hz* 60Hz 75Hz 85Hz

1024x768 pels

SVGA Grph
SVGA Grph SVGA Grph 50 SVGA Grph SVGA Grph SVGA Grph
1280x1024 pels 1280x1024 pels
32K/32K 8x16 64K/64K 8x16 16M/16M 8x16
32K/32K 35.5kHz 87Hz* 35.5kHz 60Hz 64K/64K 35.5kHz 87Hz* 35.5kHz 60Hz 16M/16M 31.5kHz 60Hz 37.6kHz 75Hz 43.2kHz 85Hz 16M/16M 37.9kHz 60Hz 46.9kHz 75Hz 53.7kHz 85Hz 16M/16M 35.5kHz 48.5kHz 60.0kHz 68.8kHz 87Hz* 60Hz 75Hz 85Hz

16M/16M 8x16

*These modes are interlaced. All others are non-interlaced.

Glossary

TECHNICAL NOTE: Some features defined in this glossary may not be available on your computer.

Acronyms

AC: ANSI: APM: ASCII: AVI: BBS: BIOS: BPS: CAD: Alternating Current American National Standards Institute Advanced Power Management American Standard Code for Information Interchange Audio Video Interleaved Bulletin Board Service Basic Input/Output System Bits Per Second Computer Aided Design
CD-ROM: Compact Disc Read-Only Memory
CMOS: COM1: COM2: CPU: CRT: DC: DMA: DIMM: DOS: DPI: DSTN: DSVD: DVD: ECC: ECP: EDO: EGA: EMS: ESD: FCC: FIR: FPS: GB: GND:
Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Communications Port 1 (serial port) Communications Port 2 (serial port) Central Processing Unit Cathode Ray Tube Direct Current Direct Memory Access Dual Inline Memory Module Disk Operating System Dots Per Inch Dual SuperTwist Nematic Digital Simultaneous Voice and Data Digital Versatile Disc Error-Correcting Code Enhanced Capabilities Port Extended Data Output Enhanced Graphics Adapter Expanded Memory Specification Electrostatic Discharge Federal Communications Commission Fast Infrared Frames per Second Gigabyte Ground

disk cache: A technique that speeds up processing. Each time your application receives data from a disk, a special program stores the data in a reserved area of memory (RAM). When the application next requests data, it looks for it first in the disk cache. Since reading from and writing to memory is quicker than using a disk drive, this can considerably improve system performance. disk drive: The device that reads and writes information and programs on a diskette or hard disk. It rotates the disk at high speed past one or more read/write heads. diskette: A thin, flexible disk in a protective jacket that stores magnetically encoded data. Diskettes can be removed from the computer and come in two sizes: 5.25-inch and 3.5-inch. Your computer uses 3.5-inch diskettes. display: A computer screen. The term refers to both the built-in liquid crystal display (LCD) and to an external monitor, which typically has a cathode ray tube (CRT). docking station: A unit which replicates the computers ports and also provides additional expansion slots. See also port replicator. document: 1) A file containing a report, letter, user guide, etc. 2) In Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT, any file that contains the information you are working on. See also file. documentation: The set of manuals and/or other instructions written for the users of a computer system or program. Computer system documentation typically includes procedural and tutorial information as well as descriptions of system functions. double-click: To press the AccuPoint II control button or mouse button rapidly twice without moving the AccuPoint II or mouse. In Windows, this refers to the primary AccuPoint II control button or left mouse button, unless otherwise stated. double-density diskette: A 3.5-inch diskette that can hold up to 720 KB of information (half the capacity of a high-density diskette). download: 1) To receive a file from another computer through a modem. 2) To transmit font data from the computer to a printer. See also upload.
dpi: Dots per inch. The number of ink dots printed per linear inch. For example, a printer specification of 300 x 300 dpi means that the printer can make 300 dots per inch both vertically and horizontally. drag: To hold down the AccuPoint II control button or mouse button while moving the cursor. In Windows, this refers to the primary AccuPoint II control button or left mouse button, unless otherwise stated. driver: See device driver. Dual SuperTwist Nematic: A type of LCD display. duplex: The method used to transmit data in both directions between two devices. Synonymous with full duplex. See also half duplex, full duplex. DVD-ROM: A very high-capacity storage medium that uses laser optics for reading data. The computer can read data from these discs, but cannot write data to the discs. Each disc can hold as much data as several CD-ROMs. Digital Simultaneous Voice and Data (DSVD): An all-digital technology for concurrent voice and data (SVD) transmission over a single analog telephone line.

doc1

Energy Star Compliance

As an Energy Star partner, Toshiba has determined that this product is Energy Star Compliant.

Contents

Part I: Getting to Know Your Computer
Chapter 1: Finding Your Way Around.. 1
Making sure you have everything.. 1 Finding where everythings located.. 1 Front with the display panel closed.. 2 Left side... 3 Back... 4 Right side.... 6 Underside.... 7 Keyboard and display features.. 8 Front with the display panel open.. 8 Indicator panel lights... 9 External diskette drive... 11
Chapter 2: Getting Started... 13
Selecting a place to work.. 13 Creating a computer-friendly environment. 13 Keeping yourself comfortable.. 14 Other precautions... 17
Setting up your computer.. Connecting the AC adapter... Charging the battery.. Connecting other external components.. Turning on the computer.. Opening the display panel.. Turning on the power.. Operating system... Using the computer for the first time.. Registering your computer... When and how to turn off the computer.. Using external display devices.. Connecting the display device... Directing the display output when you turn on the computer... Adjusting the quality of the external display. Video limitations... Using an external keyboard.. Making your external keyboard emulate the Fn key. Using a mouse... Setting up a PS/2 mouse with the AccuPoint II. Connecting a local printer... Connecting the external diskette drive.. Connecting external speakers or headphones. Connecting an external microphone.. Using an expansion device... Adding memory... Memory module sizes.. Installing a memory module.. Removing a memory module... Swapping SelectBay modules.. Removing a module from the SelectBay. 48
Chapter 3: Connecting Other External Devices.. 31
Inserting a module into the SelectBay.. 50 Using the secondary battery in the SelectBay. 51 Inserting and removing PC Cards.. 53 Inserting a PC Card... 53 Removing a PC Card... 55 Setting up your PC Card for your computer. 55 Connecting a modem... 55 Connecting to a phone line... 56
Chapter 4: Learning the Basics.. 59
Precautions... 59 Computing tips... 60 Windows basics... 61 Logging on to Windows NT.. 61 Using the keyboard... 63 Character keys... 63 Making your keyboard emulate a full-size keyboard.. 64 Ctrl, Fn, and Alt keys.. 64 Function keys... 65 Windows special keys.. 65 Overlay keys... 65 Using the AccuPoint II... 68 Starting a program... 69 Starting a program from the Start menu. 69 Starting a program from Explorer.. 69 Starting a program from Run menu on the taskbar. 70 Saving your work... 71 Printing your work... 72 Using diskettes... 73 Inserting and removing diskettes. 74 Diskette care... 74 Backing up your files... 75 Copying to a diskette... 75 Using the optional DVD-ROM drive.. 75

Additional icons highlight other helpful or educational information: TECHNICAL NOTE: This icon highlights technical information about the unit.
HINT: This icon denotes helpful hints and tips.
DEFINITION: This icon indicates the definition of a term used in the text.

Other documentation

In addition to this guide, your computer may come with the following documentation:
An electronic users guide you can install by using your Configuration Builder CD supplied with your system. The Toshiba Companion Diskette Guide explains when to use the Toshiba Companion Diskette and how to use the programs on the diskette that are not discussed in this guide. The Toshiba Configuration Builder CD Instructions explain how to completely recover, selectively reinstall, or custom configure your system. The Windows documentation explains the features of the Microsoft Windows operating system. Guides for other software that may come preinstalled on your computer and additional software on your Configuration Builder CD.
Operating system differences
Under Windows 98 Second Edition, the following features are not supported:
Suspend/Resume (memory) mode
Under Windows NT, the following features are not supported:
CardAid Universal Serial Bus (USB) port Device Manager Microsoft online registration Hibernation mode
Standby command RingCentral PC Card hot swapping Plug and Play device installation Safe mode TECHNICAL NOTE: Though Windows NT does not support USB (Universal Serial Port) specifications, you can still use a USB-compliant mouse or keyboard by setting the USB Legacy item in TSETUP to Enabled.

Service options

Toshiba offers a full line of service options built around its SelectServ warranty programs. See the warranty and service material included with your computer for registration information. If you have a problem or need to contact Toshiba, see If you need further assistance on page 243.

PART I

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR COMPUTER

Whats in Part I

This part explains the computer components of your Tecra 8100 and how to use them. Dont hesitate to skip around. Guides, such as this one, are not meant to be read from cover to cover.

Chapter

Making sure you have everything. 1 Finding where everythings located. 1 Keyboard and display features. 8 External diskette drive. 11

Finding Your Way Around

This chapter presents a grand tour of your Tecra 8100 computer with illustrations to guide you along your way. It serves as a reference when you need to locate specific parts of the computer.
Making sure you have everything
Before you do anything else, consult the Quick Start card shipped with your unit to make sure you received everything. If any items are missing or damaged, notify your network administrator.
Finding where everythings located
The next few pages take you on a guided tour of the computer and its components.
Finding Your Way Around Finding where everythings located
Front with the display panel closed
System indicator panel Display latch
Battery Reset button Volume control dial
The system indicator panel is made up of several status lights that provide information about various system functions. See System indicator lights on page 9 for a description of each of the panel lights. Sliding the display latch opens the computer display panel. For more information, see Keyboard and display features on page 8. The battery powers the computer when it is not connected to an AC outlet. The volume control dial lets you adjust the loudness of the system speakers. Pressing the reset button restarts the computer. This button overrides the Suspend/Standby command in Windows, which enable you to continue working from where you left off. Use this button when other methods of restarting the computer have failed. CAUTION: Never use a pencil to press the reset button. Pencil lead can break off inside the computer and damage it. Instead, use a slim object such as a straightened paper clip.

Left side

PC Card ejection tabs PC Card slots Speaker Headphone jack Microphone jack
Cooling vent PC Card lock External diskette drive port cover
Power button Power button cover
The PC Card ejection tabs allow easy removal of PC Cards. The PC Card slots allow you to use Type I, Type II, or Type III PC Cards. The left side speaker lets you hear stereo sound from a CD or DVD in addition to system alarms and audible warnings associated with your software. The 3.5 mm headphone jack lets you connect stereo headphones or other audio output devices. Connecting headphones or other devices to this jack automatically disables the internal speakers. The 3.5 mm microphone jack lets you connect an external monaural microphone or other audio input device. Connecting a microphone or other device to this jack automatically disables the internal microphone. The cooling vent provides ventilation to keep the computers Pentium processor from overheating. This lets the processor continue performing at its maximum speed. CAUTION: To prevent possible overheating of the Pentium processor, make sure you dont block the cooling vent.

For more information on battery use, see Running the computer on battery power on page 88.
Connecting other external components
You should attach any other external components and devices to your Tecra computer before you turn it on. For more information about other external components, see Connecting Other External Devices on page 31.
Getting Started Turning on the computer

Turning on the computer

The computer is now ready for you to turn it on and begin using it.
Opening the display panel
Release the display latch. Lift the display panel. CAUTION: To avoid damaging the display panel, do not force it beyond the point where it moves easily, and never lift the computer by the display panel.

Turning on the power

To turn on the computer: 3 Make sure any external devices (such as the AC adapter) are properly connected and ready. If the diskette drive is connected, check that it is empty. Slide the power button cover on the left side of the computer toward the rear, revealing the power button.
Exposing the power button
Press and hold the power button in until the on/off light on the system indicator panel turns on (green)about one second.
Turning on the power The AC power light glows when the computer is connected to an external power source. The battery light does not glow if the AC adapter is not plugged in. If the adapter is plugged in, the battery light glows amber while the battery is being charged, and glows green when it is fully charged. If a battery is installed in the SelectBay, the SelectBay battery light glows amber when the battery is charging and green when the battery is fully charged. Otherwise the light is off. The hard disk drive light flashes to indicate that the hard disk drive is currently in use. If there is a disk device installed in the SelectBay, the SelectBay drive light flashes periodically to indicate that the device is available, and flashes when the device is in use. CAUTION: Never turn off the computer while any of the drives are in use.
Getting Started Operating system
The preinstalled operating system will load automatically. CAUTION: When you turn on the computer for the first time, dont turn off the power again until the operating system has loaded completely.

Operating system

Your computer comes with one of the following operating systems preinstalled:
Microsoft Windows 98 Second Edition Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0
The appropriate Microsoft operating system documentation comes with your Toshiba computer.
Using the computer for the first time
When you start your computer for the first time, it prompts you to:
Set up your software Set date/time properties Set up your printer Complete the initial start-up procedure Register your computer

For lowercase letters, hold down Fn while you type the letters. For uppercase letters, hold down both Fn and Shift while you type the letters.
To use the cursor control keys when the numeric overlay is on.
Press and hold down Shift while you use the cursor control overlay keys. To return to the numeric overlay, release Shift.
To disable the numeric keypad overlay, hold down the Fn key and press F11 again. The numeric mode light on the keyboard indicator panel goes out.
Using the overlay for cursor control
The keys with the white arrows and white symbols on the left front are the cursor control overlay. To turn the cursor control overlay on, press Fn and F10 simultaneously. The cursor control light on the keyboard indicator panel glows when the cursor control overlay is on. To type alphabetic characters while the overlay is on:
To use the numeric overlay keys while the cursor control overlay is on:
Hold down Shift while you use the numeric overlay keys. To return to the cursor control overlay, release Shift.
To disable the cursor control overlay, hold down the Fn key and press F10 again. The cursor control mode light on the keyboard indicator panel goes out.
Learning the Basics Using the AccuPoint II

Using the AccuPoint II

AccuPoint II pointing device
Page up Page down Primary button Secondary button
The AccuPoint II keys The round button in the middle of the keyboard is the AccuPoint II pointing device. It enables you to move the cursor and to select items on the screen. (If you would prefer to use a mouse or trackball, you can connect one to the computers serial port or PS/2 port. See Using a mouse on page 36. To move the cursor, gently push the pointing device in the direction you want the cursor to move. Pushing harder on the pointing device moves the cursor faster. The primary button acts as the left button on a mouse. The secondary button acts as the right mouse button. The small left button performs the same function as the Page Up key. The small right button performs the same function as the Page Down key. When a step instructs you to click or choose an item, move the cursor to the item, then press and release the primary button. To double-click, press the primary button twice in rapid succession.
Learning the Basics Starting a program

Starting a program

In Windows there are three ways to start a programfrom the Start menu, from Windows Explorer, or from the Run menu on the task bar.
Starting a program from the Start menu
To start a program that has an icon in the Programs menu, follow these steps, which use the Windows Wordpad program as an example: 1 Click Start, then point to Programs. Windows displays the Programs menu, which lists programs and program groups. If your program is listed, go to step 3, otherwise, continue with step 2. 2 Point to the program group, in this example, Accessories. Windows displays the Accessories menu. 3 Click the program, in this example, Wordpad. Windows opens Wordpada scaled-down word processor. Thats all there is to it. To close the program, click the Close button at the upper-right corner of the window.

Inserting compact discs

To insert a disc into the DVD-ROM or CD-ROM drive: Make sure the in-use indicator light is off. With the computers power on, locate and press the DVDs eject button. The disc tray slides partially out of the drive (about 1 inch). HINT: The drive wont open if the computers power is off.
Grasp the tray and pull it fully open.
The drive tray fully extended
Hold the disc by its edges and check that it is free of dust. If the disc is dusty, clean it as described in Problems with the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive on page 226.
Place the disc carefully in the tray, label side up.
Positioning the disc in the drive 6 Gently press the disc onto the center spindle until you feel it click into place. CAUTION: Handle DVDs and CDs carefully, making contact only with the center hole and edge. Dont touch the surface of the disc. Dont stack discs. If you incorrectly handle the discs, you could lose data.
Make sure the disc is completely on the spindle and is lying flat. CAUTION: If you insert the disc incorrectly, it may jam in the drive. If this happens, contact your network administrator for assistance.
Push the tray in by pressing gently on the center of the tray until it clicks into place. You are ready to use the disc.

Playing a CD or DVD

For information on playing a disc, see Using Microsoft CD Player on page 121, or Using the DVDExpress DVD Player on page 122.

Removing compact discs

To remove a compact disc with the computer turned on: 1 Press the eject button on the drive. CAUTION: Do not press the eject button while the computer is accessing the DVD-ROM drive. Wait for the system indicator panels DVD-ROM drive light to go out before you open the drawer. Also, if the disc is still spinning when you open the DVD-ROM tray, wait for it to stop before you remove it.
Pull the tray until it is fully open, remove the disc, and place it in its protective cover. Push the tray in to close the drive.
To remove a compact disc with the computer turned off: 3 Insert a slender object, such as a straightened paper clip, into the manual eject hole. Pull the tray until it is fully open, remove the disc and place it in its protective cover. Push the tray in to close the drive.
Learning the Basics Using PC Cards

Caring for CDs and DVDs

Store your discs in their original containers to protect them from scratches and keep them clean. Dont bend a disc or place heavy objects on top of it. Dont apply a label to, or otherwise mar the surface of a disc. Hold a disc by its outside edge. Fingerprints on the surface can prevent the DVD-ROM drive from reading the data properly. Dont expose discs to direct sunlight or extreme heat or cold. To clean a disc that is dirty, wipe it with a clean, dry cloth. The most efficient method to clean it is to start from the center of the disc and wipe toward the outward edge (not in a circle). If necessary, moisten the cloth with water or a neutral cleaner (not benzine or rubbing alcohol). Let the disc dry completely before inserting it in the drive.

Changing batteries

CAUTION: When handling battery packs, dont drop or knock them. Also be careful not to damage the casing or shortcircuit the terminals.
To change the battery: 5 Save your work. Shut down and turn off the computer. Remove all cables connected to the computer. Turn the computer over. Slide the computer latch to release the battery.
Unlocking the battery (bottom view) 6 Pull the discharged battery module out of the computer.
Removing the discharged battery WARNING: If the battery is leaking or its case is cracked, put on protective gloves to handle it, and discard it immediately following the advice in Disposing of used batteries safely on page 105.
Wipe the terminals of the charged battery with a clean cloth to ensure a good connection. Insert the charged battery into the slot until the latch clicks.
Power Management Taking care of your battery
The battery pack has been designed so that you cannot install it with reverse polarity. CAUTION: If the battery does not slide into the slot easily, move the battery lock to the unlocked position and try again. Dont force the battery into position.
Turn the computer right side up.
10 Reconnect any cables. 11 Restart the computer. For information on changing a battery in a SelectBay module, see Swapping SelectBay modules on page 47.
Taking care of your battery
The following sections offer tips on how to take care of your battery and prolong its life.

Safety precautions

Never try to disassemble a battery pack. Dont overcharge or reverse charge a battery. Overcharging will shorten its life and reverse charging could destroy it, causing the release of toxic fumes. Dont touch the metal terminals of the battery with another metal object. Short circuiting the battery will cause it to overheat and may do permanent damage. Never incinerate a spent battery as this will cause it to explode releasing toxic materials. If a battery is leaking or damaged, replace it immediately. Use protective gloves when handling a damaged battery.
When you need to replace the main battery, use an identical battery from the same manufacturer.

Maximizing battery life

If youre not going to use the computer for a long period, remove the battery pack. Alternate between battery packs if you have a spare. Make sure your computer is turned off when youre replacing the battery pack. Store spare battery packs in a cool dry place out of direct sunlight.

Printers panel 2 Double-click Add Printer. The Add Printer Wizard starts.

Add Printers Wizard

Click Next. The Add Printer Wizard asks you to select your printer. TECHNICAL NOTE: If your printer is Plug and Play, Windows 98 Second Edition recognizes it automatically. You can ignore the remainder of this section.
If the printer you are setting up:
Is not connected to a network, select Local printer. Is connected to a network, select Network printer.
Click Next. Add Printer Wizard prompts you to select your printer.
From the list of manufacturers and printers, select your printer, then click Next. Add Printer Wizard prompts for the printer port.
Select the port settings according to the instructions in your printers documentation and the port to which your printer is connected, then click Next. Add Printer Wizard prompts you to enter a friendly printer name.
Enter a name for your printer, then click Next. HINT: If you are using more than one printer, make sure the name is descriptive enough to help you tell the difference.
If you want this printer to be:
The default printer for Windows 98 Second Edition, click Yes. Part II: Technical Reference
Available when specifically requested, click No.
10 Click Next. Windows 98 Second Edition prompts you to print a test page. 11 If your printer is connected and turned on, click Finish to print a test page. To complete the setup procedure without printing a test page, click No, then click Finish. You are now ready to print. 12 Click OK to print. Depending on your program, you may see various messages indicating the status of your print job.
Setting up Windows NT to work with your printer
To set up a printer with the Windows NT Add Printer Wizard: 1 Open the Printers window.
Printers Window 2 Double-click Add Printer. The Add Printer Wizard starts and prompts you to specify how the printer is to be managed.
Add Printer Wizard dialog box 3 Select one of the following printer management options:
My Computer All settings are managed and configured on this computer. Network printer server Connects to a printer on another machine. All settings for this printer are managed by a print server that has been set by the network administrator.

Your password is saved on the diskette as a text file. If you forget your password, you can open the text file on another computer and find out what the password is. 3 Click Exit to return to the Toshiba Hard Disk Password Utilities dialog box. Click OK. You are prompted to reboot the computer. The hard disk drive password will be registered the next time you restart the computer. Each time you start the computer from the hard disk, the system will prompt you to enter your password. When prompted, type your hard disk drive password and press Enter. If you have also selected a password from Toshiba Utilities, a prompt for that will appear as well. You get three attempts to enter your password correctly. After three incorrect attempts, the computer shuts down and you must restart it to try again.
Deleting the hard disk drive password
Click Start and point to Programs. Click Windows NT Explorer. Windows NT Explorer opens. 3 Choose the C:\ drive and click the Toshiba folder to open it. The Toshiba folder opens. 4 Select and double-click the hddpwdnt.exe file. The text box shows that you have a registered password. 5 Click Delete, then click OK to continue deleting a registered password.
The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box appears. The hard disk drives with a registered password display Registered under the User columns. HINT: Clicking Cancel allows you to exit the utility.
Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box
Click User. The Master Password dialog box appears.
Master Password dialog box 7 Click Delete. The dialog box lists all the hard disk drives with registered passwords. Select one or more of the hard disk drives listed by clicking the box next to the drive. Click OK. The Delete Password dialog box displays the name of the drive for which the password is being deleted after the message, Enter the password for:.
Delete Password dialog box
10 Type the password for the drive shown in the dialog box, then click OK. A warning box appears offering you one chance to cancel the deletion process. HINT: Clicking Cancel cancels the deletion process for the current drive and starts the deletion process for the next selected drive. 11 Click Yes. After all the selected drives have been processed, the Delete Master Password dialog box appears. HINT: Clicking No cancels the deletion process.
12 Click OK. The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box displays the drives with deleted passwords as Deleted (Pending) in the status column. 13 Click Exit. A dialog box appears prompting you to shut down the computer.

Problems that are easy to fix
The more you work with your computer, the more likely you are to encounter one or more of the following problems. Usually, you can solve them relatively easily. If your computer or one of the devices connected to it isnt working properly, try this procedure first:
Troubleshooting Guide Problems when you turn on the computer
Turn off the computer and any peripheral devices connected to it. This includes a local printer and any other external devices. Check that the electrical outlet is working by plugging in another appliance such as a lamp. Check that the power cables are firmly plugged in. Check that all cables connecting peripheral devices to the computer are correctly and firmly attached. Loose cables can cause signal errors. Turn on the peripheral devices. Turn on the computer. If you are running the computer on battery power, check that the battery charge isnt low.
If the equipment still isnt working properly, refer to the devicespecific sections of this chapter.
Problems when you turn on the computer
These problems may occur when you turn on the power.

The computer wont start.

If you did not follow the steps in the previous section, make sure you attached the power cable properly or installed a charged battery. Press and hold the power button for a few seconds.
The computer starts, but then shuts down and the on/off light glows amber and blinks.
The computer has become too hot, so it has automatically entered Resume Mode and shut down. Leave the computer turned off until its interior has reached room temperature (88 degrees Fahrenheit/ 30 degrees Celsius or less). Part II: Technical Reference
If the computer will not start after it has been turned off for a while, remove the battery and reinsert it. For instructions on removing the battery, see Changing batteries on page 102.
The computer starts but, when you press a key on the keyboard or touch the AccuPoint II, nothing happens.
You are probably in Resume Mode and have a software or resource conflict. When this happens, turning the power on returns you to the problem instead of restarting the system. To clear the condition, press Ctrl, Alt, and Del simultaneously or press the reset button. Clearing the condition may get you running by disabling Resume Mode, but it won't solve a resource conflict. Read the documentation that came with the conflicting device and Resolving a hardware conflict on page 213.
The message WARNING: RESUME FAILURE. PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE appears.
This message shows that Resume Mode is disabled. The screen you were last working on cannot be restored. Press any key to continue the startup process. The Resume failure message may be caused by one or more of these conditions:
The battery pack is completely discharged and the system is not receiving power through the AC adapter. You turned off the power while the system was accessing a disk drive. You removed the battery pack while operating the computer without the AC adapter connected. You turned off the power while the system was sending or receiving data through a serial port or parallel port.

The battery appears not to power the computer for as long as it usually does.
If you frequently recharge a partially charged battery, it may not charge fully. Let the battery discharge completely, then try charging it again. Check the power-saving features in TSETUP (Windows 98 Second Edition) or Power Saver (Windows NT). Have you added a device, such as a PC Card or memory module, that takes its power from the battery? Is your software using the hard disk more? Is the display power set to turn off automatically? Is the battery fully charged to begin with? All these conditions affect how long the charge lasts.
For more information on maximizing battery power, refer to Taking care of your battery on page 104 and Conserving power on page 106.

Keyboard problems

If, when you type, strange things happen or nothing happens, the problem may be related to the keyboard itself.
The keyboard produces unexpected characters.
A keypad overlay may be on. If the numlock light or cursor control mode light is on, press Fn and F10 simultaneously to turn off the cursor control mode light or Fn and F11 simultaneously to turn off the numlock light. If the problem occurs when both the keypad overlays are off, make sure the software you are using is not remapping the keyboard. Refer to the software documentation and check that the program does not assign different meanings to any of the keys.
Youve connected an external keyboard and Windows displays one or more keyboard error messages.
The keyboard you connected may be defective or incompatible with the computer. Try using a different make of keyboard.
Nothing happens when you press the keys on the external keyboard.
You may have plugged the external PS/2 keyboard in while the computer was turned on. Click Start, Shut Down, and Restart the computer using the AccuPoint II on the internal keyboard. The computer will restart and recognize the device.
The keyboard locks and the computer will not restart.
Make sure the power is on and press the reset button.

AccuPoint II problems

Some of the keyboard conditions listed in the previous section may also affect the AccuPoint II.
Your finger easily slides off the AccuPoint II.
The AccuPoint II cap may be greasy. Remove the cap and clean it with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol. To remove the cap: 1 Firmly grasp the cap and pull it straight up.
Removing the AccuPoint II cap 2 After cleaning the cap, position it on the peg and press it into place. NOTE: The peg is square, so be careful to align the caps hole with the peg.

legacy device: A peripheral device or expansionistic that does not have the ISA Plug and Play capability built into it. light-emitting diode (LED): A semiconductor device that emits light when it receives an electric current. Used for indicators like the disk activity light. liquid crystal display (LCD): A type of display that uses a liquid substance between two transparent electrode panels. When an electric current passes through the electrodes, the molecules in the liquid form a crystalline pattern that polarizes the light passing through it. A filter over the electrodes permits only non-polarized light to pass to the surface of the display, creating light and dark pixels. load: To move information from a storage device (such as a CD-ROM) into memory for processing. local bus: A type of bus that connects devices directly to the microprocessor. Because there are no wires between the CPU and the device, information is passed at a much greater speed than through a traditional bus. See also bus. logical drive: A section of a disk that is recognized by the operating system as a separate disk drive. A systems logical drives may differ from its physical drives. For example, a single hard disk drive may be partitioned into two or more logical drives. low-density diskette: see double-density diskette.
macro: A named sequence of instructions within a programming language or application. A macro may be predefined in the language or application, or you may define your own macros for procedures you use frequently. The macro name enables you to call up the sequence of instructions when you need them. main board: See motherboard.
math coprocessor: A special processor that performs arithmetic calculations on exponential numbers. Since a computers main processor calculates with integers, a math coprocessor can greatly improve system speed if you work with large spreadsheets or some graphics programs. Some processor chips include a built-in math coprocessor. megabyte (MB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 KB. Although mega means million, one megabyte is actually 1,048,576 bytes (1024 x 1024 bytes). memory:1) The integrated circuits (chips) inside the computer that store information. The computer uses memory to run programs and temporarily store data. There are various types of memory. 2) A synonym for Random Access Memory (RAM). See Random Access Memory and Read-Only Memory. menu: A list of options on the screen, from which you can make a selection. microphone: An input device that converts sound into electronic signals for transmission and/or recording. microprocessor: A single integrated circuit (chip) that executes instructions and monitors and controls functions. One such chip forms the Central Processing Unit (CPU) of your computer. MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface): A standard for connecting musical instruments, synthesizers and computers. It provides a way of translating music into a form that the computer can use, and vice versa. mode: An operational state or method of operation, for example, Resume Mode or Boot Mode. modem: A device for transmitting computer information over telephone lines. A modem converts (modulates) digital information for transmission and also converts (demodulates) information it receives back to digital format. Many modems also interpret and execute commands received from the computer. monitor: An external device that uses rows and columns of pixels to display alphanumeric characters or graphical images. A cathode ray tube (CRT) is a common type of monitor.

document 143 changing or removing key assignments 146 keyboard 142 program 141 starting 142 viewing key assignments 145 function keys 65 assignments 145
hard disk drive in-use light 23 light 10 Master password 175 password 162, 175 passwords 175 troubleshooting 222 User password 175 Hardware Configuration online help 149 Options window 149 view or change device configuration 149 hardware conflicts DMA assignments 214 Interrupt ReQuest (IRQ) channel 214 Hardware Setup 146 headphones 40, 118 jack 3 problems 227 Hibernation mode 94 hot key alarm volume 257 display modes 258 display output settings 34 instant password 170, 255 keyboard 258 keyboard overlays 258
Energy Star 87 expansion optional devices 269 port 5 expansion capability 269 external diskette drive 11 diskette drive cover 4 diskette drive port 4 display devices 5, 31 keyboard 36 microphone 3 monitor 5, 33 mouse 36 video device 6
file names 72 file systems File Allocation Table (FAT) 72 Windows NT File System (NTFS) 72 file, backing up 60 Fn-esse assigning a key to a program or
power usage mode 101, 107, 108, 256 Shutdown mode 257 sound 257 hot keys 255 hot swapping peripherals 4
indicator panel 9, 10 overlays 65 troubleshooting 219 Windows special keys 65
LCD display 9 lighting 16 lights AC power 9 hard disk drive 10 main battery 10 numlock 11 on/off 10, 23 SelectBay battery 10, 23 SelectBay drive 10, 23 line-in jack 118
I/O port addresses 278 IBM 101-key enhanced keyboard 64 icon power-saving 157 icons xx infrared port 5 transferring files 132 using 133 input/output device addresses 278 installing memory modules 41 mouse 36 PC Cards 53 instant password 170 hot key 170 Interrupt ReQuest (IRQ) channel 214 default assignments 275
main battery 10 status 10 Master password 175 memory adding 41 expansion slots 44 memory module 7 inserting (illustration) 46 optional 269 removing 47 removing screws 45 microphone built-in 9 external 40 jack 3, 118 problems 227 modem connecting to telephone line 56 determining COM port 135 resetting port to default settings 135
jack headphone 3 microphone 3
keyboard 85-key 9 caps lock key 63 character keys 63 external 36 full size 9 function keys 65 hot keys 258
troubleshooting 225 upgrading 135 monitor connecting 31, 32, 33 port 5 mouse installing 36 serial 5, 36 MS-DOS using in Windows MS-DOS programs 139
numeric overlay 11 numlock light 11
on/off light 10 opening the computer display panel 2 optional accessories 270 carrying case 270 locking cable 270 security screws 270 optional devices 268 docking station 269 memory modules 269 PC Card slots 269 port expander 269 overlay cursor control 10 numeric 11

 

Technical specifications

Full description

The Tecra 8000 series' innovative design supports a single motherboard and allows customers a choice of standard models. This Tecra series was designed to provide unparalleled performance while streamlining qualification time by reducing support costs, minimizing personnel training and providing standardized and interchangeable components. Toshiba offers a variety of configuration options, so businesses can match features to their requirements and upgrade as needed over time, extending the life of the product and protecting the customer's investment. Ideal for business users with a range of needs, the Tecra 8000 series can serve as a mainstream portable or desktop replacement capable of handling the most demanding applications. The Tecra 8000's single platform design reduces the total cost of ownership through reduced support costs due to standardized and interchangeable components. Previous slim SelectBay devices, such as CD-ROM drives and second batteries, can be used in the new Tecra 8000 series protecting customers' investment in these options. The new hardware design uses a single motherboard, eliminating the IT managers' need to requalify systems when new CPUs are introduced. Toshiba provides standards-based manageability solutions for seamless integration into existing enterprise environments with the Tecra 8000 series. Toshiba added notebook-specific features to LANDesk Client Manager for enhanced manageability features such as fault management, system diagnostics, remote and local system monitoring-configuring-updating, and advanced power management features.

General
Recommended UseSmall business, corporate business
System TypeNotebook
Built-in DevicesMicrophone, stereo speakers, keyboard, display, TrackPoint
Width12.3 in
Depth10 in
Height1.6 in
Weight6.4 lbs
ColorBlack
Processor
ProcessorIntel Pentium III 500 MHz
Data Bus Speed100 MHz
Chipset TypeIntel 440BX
Cache Memory
TypeL2 cache - Pipeline Burst
Installed Size256 KB
RAM
Installed Size64 MB / 256 MB (max)
TechnologySDRAM
Form FactorSO DIMM 144-pin
Storage Controller
TypeIDE
Storage
Floppy Drive3.5" 1.44 MB floppy - internal / external
Hard Drive6 GB
Optical Storage
Type1 x CD-ROM - removable plug-in module
Read Speed24x
Compliant StandardsKodak PhotoCD, CD-DA, CD-XA, CDi
Display
Display Type14.1" TFT integrated
Max Resolution1024 x 768 ( XGA )
Widescreen DisplayNo
Color Support24-bit (16.7 million colors)
Video
Graphics Processor / VendorPCI - NeoMagic MagicMedia 256AV (NM2200)
Video Memory2.5 MB SGRAM
Supported Display GraphicsVGA (640x480), XGA (1024x768), SVGA (800x600), SXGA (1280x1024)
Video Output SupportedNTSC, PAL
Audio
Audio OutputSound card
Compliant StandardsSound Blaster, Sound Blaster 16/Pro, Microsoft WSS 1.0/2.0, DirectSound3D
Audio InputMicrophone - integrated
Input Device(s)
TypeKeyboard, TrackPoint
Telecom
ModemFax / modem
Max Transfer Rate56 Kbps
Protocols & SpecificationsBell 103, ITU V.21, Bell 212A, ITU V.22, ITU V.22bis, ITU V.29, ITU V.32, ITU V.32bis, ITU V.34, ITU V.90, ITU V.17, ITU V.23, ITU V.27ter, k56Flex
Expansion / Connectivity
Expansion Bays1 x front accessible
Expansion Slots Total (Free)2 ( 1 ) x memory - SO DIMM 144-pin 1 ( 1 ) x PC Card - type III (2 x type I / II)
Interfaces1 x parallel - IEEE 1284 (EPP/ECP) - 25 pin D-Sub (DB-25) 1 x storage - floppy interface 1 x display / video - composite video output - RCA 1 x display / video - VGA - 15 pin HD D-Sub (HD-15) 1 x USB - 4 pin USB Type A 1 x modem - phone line - RJ-11 1 x headphones - output - mini-phone stereo 3.5 mm 1 x keyboard / mouse - generic - 6 pin mini-DIN (PS/2 style) 1 x serial - RS-232C - 9 pin D-Sub (DB-9) 1 x docking / port replicator - 240 pin docking 1 x microphone - input - mini-phone mono 3.5 mm 1 x audio - line-in - mini-phone stereo 3.5 mm 1 x infrared - IrDA
Miscellaneous
FeaturesKensington MicroSaver security system, PC Card security, administrator password, system password, power-on password, hard drive I/O control
Compliant StandardsPlug and Play
Power
Power DeviceExternal
Voltage RequiredAC 110/220 V ± 10% ( 50/60 Hz )
Power Provided45 Watt
Compliant StandardsEPA Energy Star
Battery
TechnologyLithium ion
Installed Qty1 / 2 (max)
Capacity3750 mAh
Run Time (Up To)3.5 hour(s)
Recharge Time2.2 hour(s)
Operating System / Software
OS ProvidedMicrosoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0
SoftwareDrivers & Utilities, Microsoft Internet Explorer, Intel LANDesk Client Manager, Norton AntiVirus
Manufacturer Warranty
Service & Support3 years warranty
Service & Support DetailsLimited warranty - parts and labor - 3 years - carry-in
Environmental Parameters
Min Operating Temperature41 °F
Max Operating Temperature95 °F
Humidity Range Operating20 - 80%
Shock Tolerance10 g @ 11ms half-sine pulse (operating) / 60 g @ 11ms half-sine pulse (non-operating)
Max Altitude Operating9840 ft
Universal Product Identifiers
BrandToshiba
Part NumberPT810U-11953
GTIN00032017049352

 

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